News Release

U.S. Department of Labor Issues Final Rule to Simplify Retail or Service Establishment Exemption

WASHINGTON, DC – The U.S. Department of Labor today announced a final rule to provide greater simplicity and flexibility to retail industry employers.

Provisions in the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) allow employers in retail and service industries to exempt certain employees paid primarily on a commission basis from overtime.

Today’s rule withdraws two provisions from the Department’s Wage and Hour Division regulations. The first listed industries that the Department previously viewed as having “no retail concept,” which made them ineligible to claim the exemption. The second listed industries that, in the Department’s view, “may be recognized as retail,” and were potentially eligible for the exemption. As the rule explains, some courts have questioned whether these lists lack any rational basis.

By withdrawing these two lists, establishments in industries that had been on the non-retail list may now assert that they have a retail concept and—if they meet the existing definition of retail and other criteria—may now qualify for the exemption. Insofar as these establishments were deterred from availing themselves of the exemption and its flexibilities, they may now do so if they qualify—including by having more flexibility to work with workers on commission-based pay arrangements. For these employers and workers, they could consider whether, for instance, more commission-based pay is sensible.

Establishments in industries that were on the “may be” retail list may continue to assert they have a retail concept.

Moving forward, the Department will apply the same analysis to all establishments to determine whether they have a retail concept and qualify as retail or service establishments, promoting greater simplicity and flexibility for employers and workers alike.

“This final rule unshackles job creators in the retail space who had previously been categorically excluded from the exemption without notice and comment,” said Wage and Hour Division Administrator Cheryl Stanton. “Permitting all retail employers to potentially qualify for this exemption can increase flexibility for businesses and workers. Eliminating confusion empowers job creators to grow their businesses, comply with the law and provide even more good jobs for American workers.”

The Department is issuing this rule without notice and comment, and it will take immediate effect. Neither notice and comment nor a delayed effective date are needed because both lists being withdrawn were interpretive regulations originally issued in 1961 without notice and comment or a delay.

Read the final rule here.

The mission of the Department of Labor is to foster, promote and develop the welfare of the wage earners, job seekers and retirees of the United States; improve working conditions; advance opportunities for profitable employment; and assure work-related benefits and rights.

Agency
Wage and Hour Division
Date
May 18, 2020
Release Number
20-1008-NAT
Contact: Department of Labor National Contact Center
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