Child Labor and Forced Labor Reports

Congo, Democratic Republic of the (DRC)

Cobalt Ore (Heterogenite)
Cobalt Ore (Heterogenite)
Child Labor Icon
Copper
Copper
Child Labor Icon
Diamonds
Diamonds
Child Labor Icon
Gold
Gold
Child Labor Icon
Forced Child Labor Icon
Forced Labor Icon
Tantalum Ore (Coltan)
Tantalum Ore (Coltan)
Child Labor Icon
Forced Child Labor Icon
Forced Labor Icon
Tin Ore (Cassiterite)
Tin Ore (Cassiterite)
Child Labor Icon
Forced Child Labor Icon
Forced Labor Icon
Tungsten Ore (Wolframite)
Tungsten Ore (Wolframite)
Child Labor Icon
Forced Child Labor Icon
Forced Labor Icon
Congo, Democratic Republic of the (DRC)
2018 Findings on the Worst Forms of Child Labor:

Minimal Advancement – Efforts Made but Continued Practice that Delayed Advancement

In 2018, the Democratic Republic of the Congo made a minimal advancement in efforts to eliminate the worst forms of child labor. The government convicted two former militia leaders of war crimes, including for the recruitment and use of children in armed conflict. The Ministry of Mines also launched a traceability and monitoring system for artisanal mines to detect cases of child labor. However, despite new initiatives to address child labor, the Democratic Republic of the Congo is receiving an assessment of minimal advancement because it continued a practice that delayed advancement in eliminating the worst forms of child labor. Research indicates that labor inspectors failed to conduct any worksite inspections for the third year in a row. Labor inspections are a key tool for identifying child labor violations, and their absence makes children more vulnerable to the worst forms of child labor. In addition, members of the Armed Forces of the Democratic Republic of the Congo detained and sometimes committed extra-judicial killing of boys due to their perceived support or affiliation with non-state armed groups. Children in the Democratic Republic of the Congo engage in the worst forms of child labor, including in the forced mining of gold, tin ore (cassiterite), tantalum ore (coltan), and tungsten ore (wolframite), and are used in armed conflict, sometimes as a result of forcible recruitment or abduction by non-state armed groups. Other gaps remain, including a lack of trained enforcement personnel, limited financial resources, poor coordination of government efforts to combat child labor, and laws mandating free primary education which are not enforced.

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