Mobilizing Community Action and Promoting Opportunities for Youth in Ghana's Cocoa-Growing Communities (MOCA)

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Region/Country:
Project Duration:
November 2015
-
November 2019
Funding and Year:
FY
2015
: USD
4,500,000

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The Problem

Cocoa is one of Ghana’s most important commodities, but farming families face persistent poverty, with the average cocoa farmer’s income equaling approximately $1 a day. Poverty is one of the factors contributing to child labor on cocoa farms. In 2014, some 246,000 youth ages 15–17 worked in cocoa production in Ghana. These youth face hazardous working conditions, including through the use of agrochemicals, and lack awareness about, and training in, safe, productive farming practices acceptable for their age. Some youth in cocoa growing areas also face challenges finding safe work in other sectors and lack the skills needed to secure such opportunities in their communities.

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Our Strategy

Address child labor in cocoa-growing areas of Ghana through the following objectives:

Objective 1: Cocoa-growing communities design and implement CAPs to address child labor at community level.

Objective 2: At-risk youth possess skills and education directly related to labor market needs.

Objective 3: Youth of legal working age transition to acceptable work.

Objective 4: Households provided with livelihood services and occupational safety and health (OSH) training.

The project is designed to reach these objectives through the following activities:

Objective 1:

  • Train and support CAP committees to design CAPs.
  • Issue grants to cocoa-growing communities to support implementation of CAP activities developed by community members to address child labor.
  • Provide advocacy training to CAP committees.
  • Conduct training-of-trainers for community members to serve as discussion leaders on issues related to child labor and OSH.
  • Support youth-led CAP activities.

Objective 2:

  • Conduct a market assessment to determine high-demand skill areas.
  • Tailor curriculum for agriculture and non-agriculture training that reflects market assessment findings.
  • Set up model farm schools (MFS) and vocational training programs that incorporate OSH and soft skills (including literacy, numeracy, leadership, and communication skills) training.
  • Provide scholarships to youth for formal education.

Objective 3:

  • Match youth with appropriate internships or apprenticeships, including with agricultural, technical, or vocational employers.
  • Provide follow-up services to help youth secure and retain employment.
  • Provide mentorship opportunities.

Objective 4:

  • Deliver MFS training to adult female household members.
  • Assist adult MFS participants in organizing into producer groups and village savings and loans associations (VSLAs).
  • Provide OSH training and protective equipment to household members.
  • Provide linkages for adult MFS graduates to access markets. 
Targets:

The MOCA Project will empower 40 cocoa-growing communities in the Ashanti and Western Regions to design and implement Community Action Plans (CAPs) to address child labor at the community level. In these communities, the project will use an integrated area-based approach to target 3,200 youth ages 15-17, who are engaged in or at risk of entering child labor in Ghana, with a focus on child labor in the cocoa sector. In addition, the project will provide livelihood services to approximately 1,600 adult female household members as a strategy for reducing household reliance on child labor. 

Grantee: Winrock International
Implementing Partners: Community Development Consult Network (CODESULT)
Contact Information:
(202) 693-4843
/
Office of Child Labor, Forced Labor, and Human Trafficking (OCFT)