Child Labor and Forced Labor Reports

Thailand

Fish
Fish
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Garments
Garments
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Forced Child Labor Icon
Forced Labor Icon
Pornography
Pornography
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Shrimp
Shrimp
Child Labor Icon
Forced Child Labor Icon
Forced Labor Icon
Sugarcane
Sugarcane
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Thailand
2018 Findings on the Worst Forms of Child Labor:

Moderate Advancement

In 2018, Thailand made a moderate advancement in efforts to eliminate the worst forms of child labor. The government increased its Labor Inspectorate budget by 47 percent and allocated more resources to inspect high-risk workplaces. The rate of access to education and enrollment for migrant children has improved. The government also supported a training for 7,255 labor volunteers on the worst forms of child labor. The government hired 394 additional labor inspectors, including Department of Labor Protection and Welfare civil servants and other government employees, and 22 additional interpreters at Department of Labor Protection and Welfare offices and fishing port inspection centers. The government continued the information-sharing agreement with the U.S. National Center for Missing and Exploited Children to combat online child commercial sexual exploitation. Finally, the government continued to work directly with NGOs to open two additional Child Advocacy Centers, bringing the total to five in Thailand. Children in Thailand engage in the worst forms of child labor, including in commercial sexual exploitation, sometimes as a result of human trafficking. Children also engage in Muay Thai fighting competitions without protective equipment. Although the government made meaningful efforts in all relevant areas during the reporting period, it does not meet the international standard for the minimum age of work. Enforcement of child labor laws remains a challenge due to an insufficient number of inspectors.

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