Child Labor and Forced Labor Reports

Philippines

Bananas
Bananas
Child Labor Icon
Coconuts
Coconuts
Child Labor Icon
Corn
Corn
Child Labor Icon
Fashion Accessories
Fashion Accessories
Child Labor Icon
Fish
Fish
Child Labor Icon
Gold
Gold
Child Labor Icon
Hogs
Hogs
Child Labor Icon
Pornography
Pornography
Child Labor Icon
Pyrotechnics
Pyrotechnics
Child Labor Icon
Rice
Rice
Child Labor Icon
Rubber
Rubber
Child Labor Icon
Sugarcane
Sugarcane
Child Labor Icon
Tobacco
Tobacco
Child Labor Icon
Philippines
2019 Findings on the Worst Forms of Child Labor:

Moderate Advancement

In 2019, the Philippines made a moderate advancement in efforts to eliminate the worst forms of child labor. The President signed Executive Order No. 92 institutionalizing the National Council Against Child Labor to help further implement the Philippines Program Against Child Labor Strategic Framework. The government also permanently closed nine establishments found to be in violation of child labor laws, and launched the 6-year #SaferKidsPH campaign, which aims to strengthen the investigation and prosecution of cases of online commercial sexual exploitation of children. Additionally, through new Republic Act No. 11310, the government institutionalized the Pantawid Pamilyang Pilipino Program, which is a conditional cash transfer program that focuses on reducing child labor. However, children in the Philippines engage in the worst forms of child labor, including in commercial sexual exploitation, sometimes as a result of human trafficking, and in armed conflict. Children also perform dangerous tasks in agriculture and gold mining. Although the government made meaningful efforts in all relevant areas during the reporting period, it did not adequately protect children allegedly engaged in drug trafficking from inappropriate incarceration, penalties for crimes they were forced to commit, or physical harm. Additionally, research was unable to find evidence that the government investigated police officers accused of extrajudicial killings of children during anti-drug operations in 2019. The enforcement of child labor laws remains challenging, especially due to the limited number of inspectors, lack of resources for inspections, and inspectors’ inability to assess penalties.

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