Child Labor and Forced Labor Reports

Philippines

Bananas
Bananas
Child Labor Icon
Coconuts
Coconuts
Child Labor Icon
Corn
Corn
Child Labor Icon
Fashion Accessories
Fashion Accessories
Child Labor Icon
Fish
Fish
Child Labor Icon
Gold
Gold
Child Labor Icon
Hogs
Hogs
Child Labor Icon
Pornography
Pornography
Child Labor Icon
Pyrotechnics
Pyrotechnics
Child Labor Icon
Rice
Rice
Child Labor Icon
Rubber
Rubber
Child Labor Icon
Sugarcane
Sugarcane
Child Labor Icon
Tobacco
Tobacco
Child Labor Icon
Philippines
2020 Findings on the Worst Forms of Child Labor:

Moderate Advancement

In 2020, the Philippines made moderate advancement in efforts to eliminate the worst forms of child labor. The government convicted and sentenced to life imprisonment a U.S. citizen for "large-scale qualified trafficking in persons," making it the first online sexual exploitation of children conviction of a foreigner in the country and enabling the largest seizure of digital evidence to date. The government also established the Philippine National Multi-Sectoral Strategic Plan on Children in Street Situations to address the needs of street children. In addition, the House of Representatives passed House Bill No. 7836, which will raise the age of sexual consent from age 12 up to age 16, while eliminating a provision in the Penal Code that protected rapists from penalty if they proposed marriage to their victims. However, children in the Philippines are subjected to the worst forms of child labor, including in commercial sexual exploitation, sometimes as a result of human trafficking, and in armed conflict. Children also perform dangerous tasks in agriculture and gold mining. Although the government made meaningful efforts in all relevant areas during the reporting period, it did not adequately protect children allegedly engaged in drug trafficking from inappropriate incarceration or physical harm during detention. The government also did not ensure that children released from custody were placed in accredited rehabilitation centers. In addition, the government failed to take law enforcement action against officials who facilitated the production of fraudulent identity documents or were otherwise complicit in human trafficking. Moreover, the enforcement of child labor laws remained challenging throughout the country, especially due to the low number of inspectors, lack of resources for inspections, and inspectors’ inability to assess penalties.

Want this report plus over a thousand pages of research in the palm of
your hand? Download ILAB's Sweat & Toil App today!