Child Labor and Forced Labor Reports

Pakistan

Bricks
Bricks
Child Labor Icon
Forced Child Labor Icon
Forced Labor Icon
Carpets
Carpets
Child Labor Icon
Forced Child Labor Icon
Forced Labor Icon
Coal
Coal
Child Labor Icon
Forced Child Labor Icon
Forced Labor Icon
Cotton
Cotton
Forced Labor Icon
Glass Bangles
Glass Bangles
Child Labor Icon
Leather
Leather
Child Labor Icon
Sugarcane
Sugarcane
Forced Labor Icon
Surgical Instruments
Surgical Instruments
Child Labor Icon
Wheat
Wheat
Forced Labor Icon
Pakistan
2020 Findings on the Worst Forms of Child Labor:

Moderate Advancement

In 2020, Pakistan made moderate advancement in efforts to eliminate the worst forms of child labor. In February, the government formally constituted and appointed members to the National Commission on the Rights of the Child, which includes two representatives who are children. Additionally, in response to the fatal beating of an 8-year-old domestic worker by her employer, the Islamabad Capital Territory cabinet banned child domestic labor under age 14 in the capital territory. The Pakistani government also added domestic labor to the list of occupations defined as hazardous work prohibited for children under the Employment of Children Act 1991. Children in Pakistan are subjected to the worst forms of child labor, including in commercial sexual exploitation and forced domestic work, each sometimes as a result of human trafficking. Children also engage in forced labor in brick kilns and agriculture. The federal government and Balochistan Province have not established a minimum age for work or hazardous work in compliance with international standards. In addition, provincial labor inspectorates do not receive sufficient resources to adequately enforce laws prohibiting child labor, and the federal and provincial governments did not publicly release information on their labor and criminal law enforcement efforts. Further, police corruption, particularly the taking of bribes from suspected perpetrators to ignore child labor crimes and lack of willingness to conduct criminal investigations, hindered Pakistan's ability to address the problem throughout the country.

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