Child Labor and Forced Labor Reports

Nigeria

Cocoa
Cocoa
Child Labor Icon
Forced Child Labor Icon
Forced Labor Icon
Gold
Gold
Child Labor Icon
Granite
Granite
Child Labor Icon
Forced Child Labor Icon
Forced Labor Icon
Gravel (Crushed Stones)
Gravel (Crushed Stones)
Child Labor Icon
Forced Child Labor Icon
Forced Labor Icon
Manioc/Cassava
Manioc/Cassava
Child Labor Icon
Sand
Sand
Child Labor Icon
Nigeria
2018 Findings on the Worst Forms of Child Labor:

Moderate Advancement

In 2018, Nigeria made a moderate advancement in efforts to eliminate the worst forms of child labor. The government adopted the Edo State Trafficking in Persons Prohibition Law, which codified the Edo State Taskforce for implementation. Nigeria's National Agency for the Prohibition of Trafficking in Persons received $715,100 for victim care in 2018, a three-fold increase over its 2017 allocation, and government officials appropriated $3.8 million to provide training and education materials to raise awareness among youth of the dangers of human trafficking. Criminal investigators also conducted 314 investigations into the worst forms of child labor, resulting in 5 convictions. Although the government made meaningful efforts in all relevant areas during the reporting period, Nigeria's security forces continued to detain children for prolonged periods of time due to their alleged association with Boko Haram, including girls who were used as concubines. Children engage in the worst forms of child labor, including in quarrying granite and gravel, commercial sexual exploitation, and armed conflict. Other gaps remain, including inconsistencies regarding child labor in the legal framework, and the minimum age for work is below international standards. Furthermore, there are not enough labor inspectors to provide sufficient coverage of the workforce, and social programs are not sufficient to address the scope of the problem.

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