Child Labor and Forced Labor Reports

Mexico

Onions
Onions
Child Labor Icon
Cucumbers
Cucumbers
Child Labor Icon
Tobacco
Tobacco
Child Labor Icon
Beans (Green Beans)
Beans (Green Beans)
Child Labor Icon
Flowers (Poppies)
Flowers (Poppies)
Child Labor Icon
Melons
Melons
Child Labor Icon
Chile Peppers
Chile Peppers
Child Labor Icon
Forced Labor Icon
Sugarcane
Sugarcane
Child Labor Icon
Eggplants
Eggplants
Child Labor Icon
Pornography
Pornography
Child Labor Icon
Tomatoes
Tomatoes
Child Labor Icon
Forced Labor Icon
Coffee
Coffee
Child Labor Icon
Cattle
Cattle
Child Labor Icon
Garments
Garments
Child Labor Icon
Leather Goods
Leather Goods
Child Labor Icon
Mexico
2019 Findings on the Worst Forms of Child Labor:

No Assessment

For the 2019 reporting period, no assessment has been made regarding Mexico's efforts to advance the elimination of the worst forms of child labor because this is the first year that efforts have been assessed and suggested actions are included for Mexico. During the reporting period, the Government of Mexico made meaningful efforts in all relevant areas to combat the worst forms of child labor, including the ratification of the United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement, and the revision of the General Education Law to strengthen educational access for children from marginalized groups. The government also obtained convictions in 12 cases of child trafficking, established a new commission for the protection of migrant children, and drafted the Plan of Action to Combat Child Labor 2019–2024. Furthermore, the government carried out its 2019 National Child Labor Survey, and continued to fund and support a program that improved educational access for over 73,000 indigenous and Afro-descendant children. However, children in Mexico engage in the worst forms of child labor, including in commercial sexual exploitation, sometimes as a result of human trafficking, and in illicit activities, such as the production and trafficking of drugs. Children also perform dangerous tasks in agriculture, including in the production of chile peppers, coffee, sugarcane, and tomatoes. Although nearly 60 percent of employment occurs in the informal sector, federal and some state-level labor inspectors are only permitted to carry out inspections in the informal sector in response to complaints. In addition, a lack of human and financial resources limited the government's ability to adequately enforce labor and criminal law, and the government did not publish complete information on its labor and criminal law enforcement efforts. Furthermore, social programs to combat child labor do not address all relevant sectors of child labor in Mexico.

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