Child Labor and Forced Labor Reports

Mexico

Onions
Onions
Child Labor Icon
Cucumbers
Cucumbers
Child Labor Icon
Tobacco
Tobacco
Child Labor Icon
Beans (Green Beans)
Beans (Green Beans)
Child Labor Icon
Poppies
Poppies
Child Labor Icon
Melons
Melons
Child Labor Icon
Chile Peppers
Chile Peppers
Child Labor Icon
Forced Labor Icon
Sugarcane
Sugarcane
Child Labor Icon
Eggplants
Eggplants
Child Labor Icon
Pornography
Pornography
Child Labor Icon
Tomatoes
Tomatoes
Child Labor Icon
Forced Labor Icon
Coffee
Coffee
Child Labor Icon
Cattle
Cattle
Child Labor Icon
Garments
Garments
Child Labor Icon
Leather Goods/Accessories
Leather Goods/Accessories
Child Labor Icon
Mexico
2020 Findings on the Worst Forms of Child Labor:

Significant Advancement

In 2020, Mexico made significant advancement in efforts to eliminate the worst forms of child labor. During the reporting period, the government published the 2019 National Child Labor Survey, the results of which will be used to develop policies and programs to combat child labor. In addition, it ratified International Labor Organization Convention 189 on Domestic Workers, and revised the Migration Law and Refugee Assistance and Asylum Law to prioritize the rights of migrant and refugee children, including prohibiting the detention of children in migrant centers and ensuring migrant and refugee children have educational access. Moreover, state governments investigated and prosecuted at least 199 child trafficking cases. The government also approved the creation of a national network of Local Committees to Prevent and Eradicate Child Labor and Protect Adolescent Workers of the Permitted Age to improve coordination efforts to address the worst forms of child labor at the municipal and local levels. Further, it published the National Program on Human Rights 2020–2024 and the Secretariat of Labor and Social Welfare's National Program for 2020–2024. However, children in Mexico are subjected to the worst forms of child labor, including in commercial sexual exploitation, sometimes as a result of human trafficking, and in illicit activities, such as the production and trafficking of drugs. Children also perform dangerous tasks in agriculture, including in the production of chile peppers, coffee, sugarcane, and tomatoes. The COVID-19 pandemic severely impacted the Mexican economy, resulting in a significant increase in the number of children engaging in child labor. Although nearly 60 percent of all employment in Mexico occurs in the informal sector, federal and some state-level labor inspectors carry out inspections in the informal sector only after receiving formal complaints. In addition, labor and criminal law enforcement agencies lacked human and financial resources which may hinder the adequate enforcement of labor and criminal laws, and the government did not publish complete information on its labor and criminal law enforcement efforts. Social programs to combat child labor do not address all relevant sectors in which child labor is found in Mexico.

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