Child Labor and Forced Labor Reports

Mexico

Onions
Onions
Child Labor Icon
Cucumbers
Cucumbers
Child Labor Icon
Tobacco
Tobacco
Child Labor Icon
Beans (Green Beans)
Beans (Green Beans)
Child Labor Icon
Poppies
Poppies
Child Labor Icon
Melons
Melons
Child Labor Icon
Chile Peppers
Chile Peppers
Child Labor Icon
Forced Labor Icon
Sugarcane
Sugarcane
Child Labor Icon
Eggplants
Eggplants
Child Labor Icon
Pornography
Pornography
Child Labor Icon
Tomatoes
Tomatoes
Child Labor Icon
Forced Labor Icon
Coffee
Coffee
Child Labor Icon
Cattle
Cattle
Child Labor Icon
Garments
Garments
Child Labor Icon
Leather Goods/Accessories
Leather Goods/Accessories
Child Labor Icon
Mexico
2021 Findings on the Worst Forms of Child Labor:

Moderate Advancement

In 2021, Mexico made moderate advancement in efforts to eliminate the worst forms of child labor. The government carried out 5,000 more labor inspections compared to the previous year and established a new voluntary labor reporting system for businesses to confirm compliance with the Labor Code. The Commission on the Rights of Refugee and Migrant Children and Adolescents also published a report on its activities during the year aiming to ensure the best interests of migrant and refugee children, including unaccompanied minors. Additionally, the government published and implemented the National Program for Children and Adolescents 2021–2024, and the Benito Juárez Wellbeing National Scholarship Program reached 9.8 million students. However, children in Mexico are subjected to the worst forms of child labor, including in commercial sexual exploitation, sometimes as a result of human trafficking, and in illicit activities, such as the production and trafficking of drugs. Children also perform dangerous tasks in agriculture, including in the production of chile peppers, coffee, sugarcane, and tomatoes. In 2021, the government eliminated many social programs that increased educational access and reduced risk for child labor in marginalized communities. Although nearly 60 percent of all employment in Mexico occurs in the informal sector, federal and some state-level labor inspectors carry out inspections in the informal sector only after receiving formal complaints. In addition, labor and criminal law enforcement agencies lacked human and financial resources and the government published limited information on its labor and criminal law enforcement efforts. Social programs to eliminate child labor also do not address all relevant sectors in which child labor is found in Mexico.

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