Child Labor and Forced Labor Reports

Mali

Cotton
Cotton
Child Labor Icon
Gold
Gold
Child Labor Icon
Rice
Rice
Child Labor Icon
Forced Child Labor Icon
Forced Labor Icon
Mali
2019 Findings on the Worst Forms of Child Labor:

Moderate Advancement

In 2019, Mali made a moderate advancement in efforts to eliminate the worst forms of child labor. The government allocated $350,000 to anti-trafficking efforts, including training judges, prosecutors, police, and civil society members on Mali's anti-trafficking law. The government also published data on enforcement efforts, including the number of labor inspections conducted and violations identified, in addition to drafting two new laws that increase penalties for trafficking crimes and exploitation of migrant children. In addition, the government published a new mining code that prohibits the use of child labor in artisanal mining. However, children in Mali engage in the worst forms of child labor, including in hereditary slavery and in armed conflict. Children also perform dangerous tasks in agriculture, particularly in the production of cotton and rice. Although the government made meaningful efforts in all relevant areas, the Malian Armed Forces also recruited and used 24 children ages 9 to 16 in support roles for at least 2 years, in violation of its national law. Although the children were released in November 2019 following high-level engagement, there is no evidence that government officials were sanctioned for the recruitment and use of the children. Further, Mali's law only prohibits hereditary slavery as a result of human trafficking, does not explicitly prohibit using, procuring, or offering children for illicit activities, and allows children under age 18 to be penalized as a direct result of forced recruitment by armed groups. In addition, resource constraints severely limited the government’s ability to fully implement the National Plan to Combat Child Labor, and social and rehabilitation services for victims of the worst forms of child labor are inadequate.

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