Child Labor and Forced Labor Reports

Honduras

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Honduras
2018 Findings on the Worst Forms of Child Labor:

Moderate Advancement

In 2018, Honduras made a moderate advancement in efforts to eliminate the worst forms of child labor. The National Congress approved a new penal code that updates penalties for human trafficking. The Secretariat of Labor and Social Security (STSS) also released a new national strategy for its labor inspectorate, and the Inter-agency Commission against Commercial Sexual Exploitation and Trafficking in Persons obtained administrative and budget autonomy. As part of implementing its Roadmap to Eliminate Child Labor, Honduras installed a National Council for Youth and Adolescents, and the country became only the second in Central America to join the Regional Action Group for the Americas against the Sexual Exploitation of Girls, Boys and Adolescents in Tourism Travel. Although the government made meaningful efforts in all relevant areas during the reporting period, it did not provide information about criminal law enforcement efforts related to the worst forms of child labor, limiting the ability to assess the adequacy of its criminal enforcement. Children in Honduras engage in the worst forms of child labor, including in commercial sexual exploitation as a result of human trafficking and recruitment by gangs into illicit activities. Children also engage in child labor in agriculture. Labor and criminal law enforcement agencies experience financial and human resource challenges that may hinder adequate law enforcement. In addition, the government’s social programs that address child labor in agriculture do not appear sufficient to address the scope of the problem nationwide, and the government lacks social programs to eliminate child labor in other dangerous activities, such as fishing, mining, and domestic work.

Children in Honduras engage in the worst forms of child labor, including in commercial sexual exploitation as a result of human trafficking, and in agriculture. (1-3) Table 1 provides key indicators on children’s work and education in Honduras.

Table 1. Statistics on Children’s Work and Education

Children

Age

Percent

Working (% and population)

5 to 14

8.6 (158,891)

Working children by sector

5 to 14

 

Agriculture

 

57.5

Industry

 

10.3

Services

 

32.2

Attending School (%)

5 to 14

87.7

Combining Work and School (%)

7 to 14

6.1

Primary Completion Rate (%)

 

84.6

Source for primary completion rate: Data from 2017, published by UNESCO Institute for Statistics, 2019. (4)

Source for all other data: International Labor Organization’s analysis of statistics from Encuesta Permanente de Hogares de Propósitos Múltiples (EPHPM), 2014. (5)

Based on a review of available information, Table 2 provides an overview of children’s work by sector and activity.

Table 2. Overview of Children’s Work by Sector and Activity

Sector/Industry

Activity

Agriculture

Production of melon, coffee, sugarcane, and okra (6-10)

Harvesting mollusks† (11,12)

Fishing, including working as divers’ assistants,† and diving for lobster† (2,13)

Industry

Quarrying limestone† and production of lime† (14)

Artisanal mining† (6,15-17)

Production and sale of fireworks† (18-22)

Construction,† activities unknown (1,2,9,23,24)

Services

Street begging and vending, including dangerous street performances for tips† (1,20,23,25,26)

Work in repair shops,† including in mechanical repair† (23,27)

Scavenging in garbage dumps† (6,26,29,30)

Work in hotels and laundromats, activities unknown (23,26)

Domestic work† (6,9,26,28)

Categorical Worst Forms of Child Labor‡

Commercial sexual exploitation as a result of human trafficking (28,31-33)

Forced begging (20,31,34)

Use in illicit activities, including by gangs in committing homicides, extortion, and selling and trafficking drugs (1,20,24,31,35,36)

† Determined by national law or regulation as hazardous and, as such, relevant to Article 3(d) of ILO C. 182.
‡ Child labor understood as the worst forms of child labor per se under Article 3(a)–(c) of ILO C. 182.

Honduras' National Statistics Institute reported that 404,642 children between the ages of 5 and 17 worked in 2018. (1) Reports indicate that 20 percent of the Honduran population is of indigenous or African descent and that children from these groups are particularly vulnerable to child labor, including its worst forms. (1,32,35,37,38) Children who lack economic and educational opportunities are the most vulnerable and are also among the most likely to migrate to other countries. Once en route, they are also vulnerable to human trafficking and commercial sexual exploitation. (32,33,39,40)

In Honduras, access to education is often limited and some reports indicate that approximately 220,000 children between the ages of 5 and 17 lack access to the educational system. More than 75 percent of these children live in rural areas, where lack of funding for schools, and in many cases, lack of any secondary schools, remain a problem. (1,36) However, one NGO reported that some 1.5 million children around the country lacked access to education in 2018. Limited infrastructure and violence originating from gang activity also present barriers to access for both children and educators. (1)

Honduras has ratified all key international conventions concerning child labor (Table 3).

Table 3. Ratification of International Conventions on Child Labor

Convention

Ratification

ILO C. 138, Minimum Age

ILO C. 182, Worst Forms of Child Labor

UN CRC

UN CRC Optional Protocol on Armed Conflict

UN CRC Optional Protocol on the Sale of Children, Child Prostitution and Child Pornography

Palermo Protocol on Trafficking in Persons

The government has established laws and regulations related to child labor (Table 4). However, gaps exist in Honduras' legal framework to adequately protect children from the worst forms of child labor, including the minimum age for work compared to the compulsory education age.

Table 4. Laws and Regulations on Child Labor

Standard

Meets International Standards

Age

Legislation

Minimum Age for Work

Yes

14

Article 120 of the Code on Childhood and Adolescence; Article 15 of the Executive Agreement STSS-211-01; Article 32 of the Labor Code (41-43)

Minimum Age for Hazardous Work

Yes

18

Articles 1 and 122 of the Code on Childhood and Adolescence; Articles 2 and 10 of the Executive Agreement STSS‑211-01;Article 1 of the Executive Agreement STSS-441-2016 (41,42,44)

Identification of Hazardous Occupations or Activities Prohibited for Children

Yes

 

Article 1 of the Executive Agreement STSS-441-2016; Article 8 of the Executive Agreement STSS‑211-01 (41,44)

Prohibition of Forced Labor

Yes

 

Articles 6 and 52 of the Law Against Trafficking in Persons (Decree 59-2012); Articles 2 and 10 of the Executive Agreement STSS‑211-01; Articles 179E, 179F, and 192 of the Penal Code (41,45,46)

Prohibition of Child Trafficking

Yes

 

Articles 6 and 52 of the Law Against Trafficking in Persons (Decree 59-2012); Articles 2 and 10 of the Executive Agreement STSS‑211-01; Article 8 of the Legislative Decree 35-2013 (41,45,47)

Prohibition of Commercial Sexual Exploitation of Children

Yes

 

Article 134 of the Code on Childhood and Adolescence; Articles 6 and 52 of the Law Against Trafficking in Persons (Decree 59-2012); Articles 2 and 10 of the Executive Agreement STSS‑211-01; Articles 148 and 149A-E of the Penal Code (41,42,45,46)

Prohibition of Using Children in Illicit Activities

Yes

 

Article 134 of the Code on Childhood and Adolescence; Article 10 of the Executive Agreement STSS‑211-01; Articles 6 and 52 of the Law Against Trafficking in Persons (Decree 59-2012); Article 8 of the Legislative Decree 35-2013 (41,42,45,47)

Minimum Age for Voluntary State Military Recruitment

Yes

18

Articles 2 and 12 of the Executive Agreement STSS‑211-01 (41)

Prohibition of Compulsory Recruitment of Children by (State) Military

N/A*

   

Prohibition of Military Recruitment by Non-state Armed Groups

Yes

 

Articles 2 and 10 of the Executive Agreement STSS‑211-01 (41)

Compulsory Education Age

Yes

17

Articles 8, 13, and 21–23 of the Fundamental Law of Education; Articles 36 and 39 of the Code on Childhood and Adolescence (42,48)

Free Public Education

Yes

 

Articles 7, 13, and 21–23 of the Fundamental Law of Education; Article 36 of the Code on Childhood and Adolescence; Article 171 of the Constitution (42,48,49)

* No conscription (41)

In January 2018, Honduras' National Congress approved a new penal code that is scheduled to take effect in November 2019. (3,50) Article 9 of the new law enables the application of criminal penalties under Honduran law against any individual who comes under Honduran jurisdiction for committing a range of crimes in any territory, including for human trafficking. (51)

As the minimum age for work is lower than the compulsory education age, children may be encouraged to leave school before the completion of compulsory education.

The government has established institutional mechanisms for the enforcement of laws and regulations on child labor (Table 5). However, gaps exist within the operations of the Secretariat of Labor and Social Security (STSS) that may hinder adequate enforcement of their child labor laws.

Table 5. Agencies Responsible for Child Labor Law Enforcement

Organization/Agency

Role

Secretariat of Labor and Social Security (STSS)

Conducts labor inspections and enforces child labor laws through the General Directorate for Labor Inspections. (52)

Public Ministry’s Office of the Special Prosecutor for Children (OSPC)

Prosecutes crimes against children, including trafficking of children, hazardous labor, forced labor, and commercial sexual exploitation. Coordinates with Honduran National Police to investigate crimes and protect victims. (24,53)

Public Ministry’s Technical Agency for Criminal Investigations (ATIC)

Investigates and technically supports criminal prosecutions conducted by the Public Ministry, including by the OSPC, such as those related to human trafficking, commercial sexual exploitation, and child pornography. (15,20,24)

Prosecutorial Task Force to Combat Criminal Smuggling of Unaccompanied Children and Trafficking in Persons

Investigates and prosecutes criminal organizations that engage in the illegal smuggling of unaccompanied children and human trafficking. Overseen by the Special Prosecutor Against Organized Crime and the Special Prosecutor for Children. (34,54)

Directorate of Childhood, Adolescence, and Family (DINAF)

Formulates, coordinates, and implements national plans concerning children and their families; monitors children’s rights, including by investigating complaints of child labor and ensuring that victims receive government services; and coordinates state efforts with civil society institutions to protect children. Overseen by the Secretariat of Development and Social Inclusion. (20,55-57)

Labor Law Enforcement
In 2018, labor law enforcement agencies in Honduras took actions to combat child labor (Table 6). However, gaps exist within the operations of the STSS that may hinder adequate labor law enforcement, including human resources.

Table 6. Labor Law Enforcement Efforts Related to Child Labor

Overview of Labor Law Enforcement

2017

2018

Labor Inspectorate Funding

Unknown

$3,300,000 (1)

Number of Labor Inspectors

140 (40)

169 (1)

Inspectorate Authorized to Assess Penalties

Yes (58)

Yes (1)

Initial Training for New Labor Inspectors

Unknown

Yes (1)

 

Training on New Laws Related to Child Labor

Yes (59)

Yes (1)

Refresher Courses Provided

Yes (59)

Yes (1)

Number of Labor Inspections Conducted

32,268 (60)

25,546 (1)

 

Number Conducted at Worksite

32,268 (60)

4,300 (1)

Number of Child Labor Violations Found

12 (60)

2 (1)

 

Number of Child Labor Violations for Which Penalties Were Imposed

12 (60)

0 (1)

Number of Child Labor Penalties Imposed that Were Collected

0 (60)

0 (1)

Routine Inspections Conducted

Yes (61)

Yes (1)

 

Routine Inspections Targeted

Yes (61)

No (1)

Unannounced Inspections Permitted

Yes (61)

Yes (1)

 

Unannounced Inspections Conducted

Yes (61)

Yes (1)

Complaint Mechanism Exists

Yes (61)

Yes (1)

Reciprocal Referral Mechanism Exists Between Labor Authorities and Social Services

No (36)

No (1)

In 2018, Honduras released a new national strategy for the General Directorate for Labor Inspections that re-envisions the entire inspection process, primarily by consolidating all inspection duties under the labor inspectorate. (62) In addition, the labor inspectorate was provided additional resources for transportation, fuel, and other necessities during the reporting period. (1) Nonetheless, labor union confederations, employer organizations, and human rights organizations have indicated that the level of funding and resources for the General Directorate for Labor Inspections is insufficient to enforce child labor laws nationwide. (1,36) Furthermore, revisions to the administrative procedures for measuring the performance of the labor inspectorate resulted in a significant drop in the number of worksite inspections conducted in 2018. (63)

The number of labor inspectors is likely insufficient for the size of Honduras’ workforce, which includes over 3.7 million workers. According to the ILO’s technical advice of a ratio approaching 1 inspector for every 15,000 workers in industrializing economies, Honduras would employ about 249 labor inspectors. Furthermore, the ratio of inspectors to number of inspections suggests that each inspector conducted 151 inspections during the year, which is a high number and may impact the quality of inspections. (1,64,65)

While STSS encountered 2 cases of child labor in 2018, the Directorate of Childhood, Adolescence, and Family (DINAF) reported removing 97 children from child labor and providing all of these children with social services. (1) During the reporting period, inspections were carried out across a myriad of sectors but did not include businesses in the informal sector, even though children in Honduras are known to work in this sector. STSS and civil society partners have all indicated that the number of inspections conducted is insufficient to address the scope of labor violations in the country, including child labor violations. (1,36,61) In particular, reports indicate that the STSS conducts most inspections in the urban areas of Tegucigalpa and San Pedro Sula, while rural areas and indigenous communities, in which hazardous activities in agriculture and fishing or diving are concentrated, have had insufficient inspections to address the scope of the problem. (28,37,66)

NGOs report that STSS procedures for responding to child labor complaints are often not followed, largely due to institutional weaknesses and a lack of resources. (20) Furthermore, there does not appear to be an adequate mechanism for the STSS and DINAF to refer cases of child labor to each other, and reports also indicate that DINAF lacks sufficient resources to effectively carry out its mandates. (20,24,36)

In 2018, only 40 inspectors received refresher training on child labor and/or hazardous child labor. The STSS indicated the training provided during the reporting period was insufficient. (1,63)

Criminal Law Enforcement
In 2018, criminal law enforcement agencies in Honduras took actions to combat child labor (Table 7). However, gaps exist within the operations of the criminal enforcement agencies that may hinder adequate criminal law enforcement, including financial resources.

Table 7. Criminal Law Enforcement Efforts Related to Child Labor

Overview of Criminal Law Enforcement

2017

2018

Initial Training for New Criminal Investigators

Unknown

Unknown

 

Training on New Laws Related to the Worst Forms of Child Labor

Unknown

Unknown

Refresher Courses Provided

Unknown

Unknown

Number of Investigations

Unknown

Unknown

Number of Violations Found

Unknown

Unknown

Number of Prosecutions Initiated

Unknown

Unknown

Number of Convictions

Unknown

Unknown

Imposed Penalties for Violations Related to The Worst Forms of Child Labor

Unknown

Yes (3)

Reciprocal Referral Mechanism Exists Between Criminal Authorities and Social Services

Yes (57)

No (1)

Two individuals were sentenced by the Supreme Court of Justice in 2018 on child pornography charges. (3) However, reports indicate that the level of funding and resources available to criminal law enforcement agencies is insufficient to meet agency needs. (57)

The government has established mechanisms to coordinate its efforts to address child labor (Table 8).

Table 8. Key Mechanisms to Coordinate Government Efforts on Child Labor

Coordinating Body

Role & Description

National Commission for the Gradual and Progressive Eradication of Child Labor

Coordinates government policies and efforts on child labor issues. Chaired by STSS and includes officials from eight government ministries, DINAF, the Supreme Court, and other government entities. (52,67,68) Oversees regional sub-commissions, led by STSS and DINAF officials, which implement national efforts at the local level. (52,67,68) During the reporting period, the National Commission did not hold any meetings. However, the Commission's technical council held two meetings to review actions taken by various sectors to combat child labor. (1)

Inter-Institutional Commission Against Exploitation and Commercial Sex Trafficking (CICESCT)

Prevents, tends to the victims of, and prosecutes crimes of sexual exploitation and trafficking in persons. Comprising representatives from 35 organizations, including several government ministries, NGOs, and private companies. (69) Oversees 19 local CICESCT committees and implements the Strategic Plan to Combat Commercial Sexual Exploitation and Human Trafficking. (35) In 2018, CICESCT achieved budget and administrative autonomy and was relocated under the Ministry of Human Rights. (3,69)

Migration Task Force*

Convenes several government ministries to collaborate on addressing irregular migration, including combating the risks associated with trafficking in persons. Initiated in 2018 and chaired by Honduras' First Lady Ana Garcia de Hernandez. (3)

Secretariat of Social Development and Inclusion (SEDIS)

Coordinates social protection policies and the provision of services to vulnerable populations. (70) SEDIS indicated that in 2018 it had invested over 60,000 USD in the Vida Mejor conditional cash transfer program and had provided services to over 350,000 families across the country. (71)

*Mechanism to coordinate efforts to address child labor was created during the reporting period.

The government has established policies that are consistent with relevant international standards on child labor (Table 9).

Table 9. Key Policies Related to Child Labor

Policy

Description

Roadmap for the Eradication of Child Labor in Honduras

Aims to eradicate all forms of child labor by 2020 and to improve the government’s response to child labor issues. Works at the national, regional, and sub-regional levels and addresses poverty, health education, and social development. (72,73) Implemented by STSS. (20,72) Held three sessions of the Guarantee System for Rights of Children and Adolescents in Honduras during 2018, including the installation of the National Council for Youth and Adolescents, which is chaired by the Secretariat General of Coordination of Government. (1,74)

Strategic Plan to Prevent and Eliminate Child Labor (2016–2020)

Identifies lines of action for preventing and eliminating child labor, including by increasing child labor law enforcement, strengthening engagement with the private sector, developing procedures for inter-agency coordination, and developing social programs to support children removed from child labor. (68) Implemented by STSS and other executive and judicial branch agencies, and employers’, workers’, and other civil society organizations. (68) Includes the U.S.-Honduras Labor Rights Monitoring and Action Plan (2015–2018), which aims to improve the enforcement of labor laws, including laws related to child labor, by implementing legal and policy reforms, strengthening STSS, enhancing enforcement activities, and increasing outreach efforts. (75) In 2018, the U.S. and Honduras agreed to extend the action plan into 2019. (3)

Strategic Plan to Combat Commercial Sexual Exploitation and Human Trafficking in Honduras (2016–2022)

Establishes national priorities to combat commercial sexual exploitation and human trafficking in four principal areas: (1) prevention and awareness; (2) investigation, prosecution, and punishment of violations; (3) detection, assistance, and protection of victims; and (4) coordination and cooperation. (76) In 2018, CICESCT held workshops and trainings with NGOs and international donors, and developed and disseminated information materials, including translations for vulnerable Miskito and Garifuna populations. (3)

First Public Policy and National Action Plan on Human Rights

Aims to implement the government’s national and international human rights commitments, including those addressing child and forced labor. (24,77) Research was unable to identify relevant activities undertaken to implement this policy during the reporting period.

‡ The government had other policies that may have addressed child labor issues or had an impact on child labor. (78-84)

In 2018, the Colombian and Honduran Ministries of Labor held an exchange to examine best practices for the prevention and elimination of child labor particularly in the coffee sector, and more generally in the agricultural sector. (1,3)

In 2018, the government funded and participated in programs that include the goal of eliminating or preventing child labor (Table 10). However, gaps exist in these social programs, including the adequacy of programs to address the full scope of the problem.

Table 10. Key Social Programs to Address Child Labor

Program

Description

Better Life Voucher (Bono Vida Mejor)†

Conditional cash transfer program that aims to reduce poverty by providing financial assistance to households after parents ensure their children participate in health, education, nutrition, and other programs. (40,85) Objectives include the elimination of child labor. (28) In 2018, the Secretaría de Desarrollo e Inclusión (SEDIS) carried out the second phase of the program with cash transfers to nine departments. (86) IDB reported in 2018 that the Bono Vida Mejor program had reduced poverty by 12.2 percentage points in Honduras. (85)

Program for the Reintegration of Returned Unaccompanied Migrant Children†

Government program that assists unaccompanied migrant children who have been returned to Honduras. Implemented by the National Institute for Migration, the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, DINAF, SEDIS, and the National Center for Social Sector Information. (87) In 2018, DINAF sent regional reintegration teams to 10 departments across the country to respond to specific cases of children who returned to the country. (88)

Program to Prevent Sex Tourism Involving Children and Adolescents†

Government program that aims to raise awareness and provide training on sex tourism for the tourism industry. Implemented by the Honduran Tourist Board, the Ministry of Tourism, and the Tourism Institute. (72,89) In 2018, registered 238 companies, each signing a code of conduct for the protection of children and adolescents against commercial sexual exploitation. (3)

USDOL-Funded Projects

USDOL projects that aim to eliminate child labor through technical assistance to businesses, direct services to Honduran youth, and capacity building with the Honduran government. These projects include: $2 million Addressing Child Labor and Forced Labor in the Coffee Supply Chain in Honduras (2017–2020); $16.5 million Youth Pathways Central America (2015–2020); and $8.7 million Bright Futures (2014–2019). During the reporting period, 28 youth from San Juan completed a training course in coffee management, and the project established 10 new youth bank groups to promote and implement youth-led community development projects. (91) Additional information is available on the USDOL website.

USAID-Funded Projects

USAID-funded projects, including Honduran Youth Alliance, which focuses on gang prevention, including for vulnerable youth; Strengthening Capacity to Build a Culture of Peace, which aims to improve citizen security, including for at-risk youth; and Improving Education for Work, Learning, and Success, which aims to increase educational opportunities for youth. (66,92)

† Program is funded by the Government of Honduras.
‡ The government had other social programs that may have included the goal of eliminating or preventing child labor. (24,28)

In 2018, Honduras became only the second Central American country to join the Regional Action Group for the Americas against the Sexual Exploitation of Girls, Boys, and Adolescents in Tourism Travel. (3)

Although the Government of Honduras funds or participates in social programs that aim to eliminate child labor in forced begging, commercial sexual exploitation, and the illegal recruitment of children into gang-related activities, research did not identify programs that specifically target children working in other dangerous activities, such as fishing, mining, and domestic work. In addition, social programs that address child labor in agriculture do not appear to be sufficient to address the scope of the problem nationwide.

Based on the reporting above, suggested actions are identified that would advance the elimination of child labor in Honduras (Table 11).

Table 11. Suggested Government Actions to Eliminate Child Labor

Area

Suggested Action

Year(s) Suggested

Enforcement

Raise the minimum working age of 14 to conform with the compulsory education age of 17.

2018

Ensure that agencies such as the Secretariat of Labor and Social Security; the Directorate of Childhood, Adolescence, and Family; the Special Prosecutor for Children; and other criminal and labor enforcement agencies have sufficient funding and resources to address the worst forms of child labor nationwide.

2010 – 2018

Increase the number of labor inspectors to meet ILO's technical advice and to ensure a sufficient number to carry out quality labor inspections and conduct a sufficient number of inspections to address the scope of child labor in Honduras.

2010 – 2018

Follow established procedures for responding to child labor complaints and carrying out labor inspections in areas in which child labor is prevalent, such as rural areas, the informal sector, and indigenous communities where children engage in agriculture and fishing or diving.

2018

Ensure that all labor inspectors receive training on child labor and make information about the initial training for new criminal investigators publicly available.

2014 – 2018

Ensure that there is an adequate, reciprocal referral mechanism between the Secretariat of Labor and Social Security and the Directorate of Childhood, Adolescence, and Family for the enforcement of labor laws and the provision of social services for child labor victims.

2014 – 2018

Publish complete information on criminal law enforcement efforts related to the worst forms of child labor, such as trainings held, number of investigations conducted, and number of convictions.

2015 – 2018

Government Policies

Ensure resources are available for the implementation of the Policy on Human Rights and report on actions taken to carry out the policy during the reporting period.

2018

Social Programs

Increase access to education by increasing funding to schools, building more schools, particularly in rural areas, and enhancing efforts to protect students from gang recruitment and violence.

2014 – 2018

Expand social programs that address child labor in agriculture and create programs that aim to prevent children from migrating and to eliminate child labor in other dangerous activities, such as fishing, mining, and domestic service.

2009 – 2018

Ensure social programs reach the children who are most vulnerable to child labor, including children of African descent and indigenous children.

2017 – 2018

  1. U.S. Embassy- Tegucigalpa. Reporting. March 11, 2019.
  2. Instituto Nacional de Estadística. Encuesta de Hogares de Propósitos Múltiples (EPHPM) 2016 Cuadros de Trabajo Infantil. October 20, 2016. http://170.238.108.227/binhnd/RpWebEngine.exe/Portal?BASE=EPH2016&lang=ESP.
  3. U.S. Embassy- Tegucigalpa. Reporting (TIP). March 18, 2019.
  4. UNESCO Institute for Statistics. Gross intake ratio to the last grade of primary education, both sexes (%). Accessed March 3, 2019. For more information, please see "Children's Work and Education Statistics: Sources and Definitions" in the Reference Materials section of this report. http://data.uis.unesco.org/.
  5. ILO. Analysis of Child Economic Activity and School Attendance Statistics from National Household or Child Labor Surveys. Analysis received January 12, 2018. Please see "Children's Work and Education Statistics: Sources and Definitions" in the Reference Materials section of this report.
  6. Casa Alianza. Jornada de capacitación sobre la situación de Violencia contra la niñez y la adolescencia en Honduras. Accessed March 21, 2014. Source on file.
  7. El Heraldo. Apenas 432 empresas registradas como libres de trabajo infantil. September 9, 2015. http://www.elheraldo.hn/alfrente/878362- 209/apenas-432-empresas-registradas-como-libres-de-trabajo-infantil.
  8. U.S. Embassy- Tegucigalpa. Reporting. November 7, 2017.
  9. UCW. Entendiendo las dinámicas del trabajo infantil en América Central y la República Dominicana. November 2017. Source on file.
  10. Secretaría de Trabajo y Seguridad Social. Desarrollan taller para erradicar trabajo infantil en Intibucá. March 7, 2017. http://www.trabajo.gob.hn/desarrollan-taller-para-erradicar-trabajo-infantil-en-intibuca/.
  11. El Heraldo. El sostenimiento del hogar recae en niños trabajadores. September 6, 2015. http://www.elheraldo.hn/alfrente/876927-209/el-sostenimiento-del-hogar-recae-en-niños-trabajadores.
  12. El Heraldo. Honduras: Pequeños curileros de San Lorenzo son los niños del fango. September 6, 2015. http://www.elheraldo.hn/alfrente/876928-209/honduras-pequeños-curileros-de-san-lorenzo-son-los-niños-del-fango.
  13. El Heraldo. Hambruna afecta a la población de La Mosquitia. July 9, 2015. http://www.elheraldo.hn/regionales/857299-218/hambruna-afecta-a-la-población-de-la-mosquitia.
  14. El Heraldo. Por 500 lempiras, niños pican piedra durante una semana. September 8, 2015. http://www.elheraldo.hn/inicio/877454-331/por- 500-lempiras-niños-pican-piedra-durante-una-semana.
  15. Government of Honduras. Respuesta a Solicitud de Información Sobre Trabajo Infantil y sus Peores Formas en Honduras. January 15, 2015. Source on file.
  16. El Heraldo. Niños expuestos a morir por el oro. September 9, 2015. http://www.elheraldo.hn/alfrente/878357-209/niños-expuestos-a-morir-por-el-oro.
  17. La Prensa. Cadáveres de los 8 mineros fueron hallados abrazados unos con otros. December 15, 2014. http://www.laprensa.hn/sucesos/777197- 410/cadáveres-de-los-8-mineros-fueron-hallados-abrazados-unos-con-otros.
  18. El Heraldo. El 50% de niños coheteros laboran antes de los 8 años. September 8, 2015. http://www.elheraldo.hn/alfrente/877849-209/el-50-de-niños-coheteros-laboran-antes-de-los-8-años.
  19. El Heraldo. Mano de obra infantil en la riesgosa elaboración de cohetes en Copán. September 8, 2015. http://www.elheraldo.hn/alfrente/877852-209/mano-de-obra-infantil-en-la-riesgosa-elaboración-de-cohetes-en-copán.
  20. U.S. Embassy- Tegucigalpa. Reporting. February 29, 2016.
  21. HCH. Menor de 14 años resultó con serias quemaduras en una fabrica de pólvora en Copán [Previously online]. August 25, 2017 [Accessed December 20, 2017]. Source on file.
  22. La Tribuna. Madre e hija ingresan quemadas por pólvora al HEU. November 28, 2017. http://www.latribuna.hn/2017/11/28/madre-e-hija-ingresan-quemadas-polvora-al-heu/.
  23. World Vision- Honduras. Diagnóstico de situación de Trabajo Infantil y erradicación de sus peores formas en Honduras. 2015. http://www.wvi.org/es/DiagnosticoHN.
  24. U.S. Embassy- Tegucigalpa. Reporting. January 15, 2015.
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