Child Labor and Forced Labor Reports

Colombia

Bricks (Clay)
Bricks (Clay)
Child Labor Icon
Coal
Coal
Child Labor Icon
Coca (Stimulant Plant)
Coca (Stimulant Plant)
Child Labor Icon
Forced Child Labor Icon
Forced Labor Icon
Coffee
Coffee
Child Labor Icon
Emeralds
Emeralds
Child Labor Icon
Gold
Gold
Child Labor Icon
Pornography
Pornography
Child Labor Icon
Sugarcane
Sugarcane
Child Labor Icon
Fruits (Pome and Stone)
Fruits (Pome and Stone)
Child Labor Icon
Grapes
Grapes
Child Labor Icon
Colombia
2021 Findings on the Worst Forms of Child Labor:

Significant Advancement

In 2021, Colombia made significant advancement in efforts to eliminate the worst forms of child labor. The government amended the Penal Code, increasing penalties for aggravating factors in crimes of human smuggling and trafficking involving children. The Ministry of Labor also adopted a "Guide for the Identification of Possible Cases of Trafficking in Persons for the Purpose of Forced Labor" to help labor inspectors identify forced labor crimes. The Intersectorial Commission for the Prevention of the Recruitment and Use of Children by Illegal Armed Groups published an extensive report analyzing the incidence and patterns of the recruitment, use, and sexual violence against children carried out by illegal armed and criminal groups for the 2016–2020 period. The Ministry of the Interior also developed and implemented the national trafficking in persons prevention plan "Zero Complicity," which focused on strengthening trafficking prevention efforts and includes a public awareness campaign. In addition, the government introduced the "Katunaa Modality" social program designed to protect the fundamental rights of children ages 6 to 13, including with regard to child labor, sexual violence, and intra-family violence. However, children in Colombia are subjected to the worst forms of child labor, including in commercial sexual exploitation and illicit activities, each sometimes as a result of human trafficking. The government does not employ a sufficient number of labor inspectors. Research also indicates that existing social programs are insufficient to address the scope of the worst forms of child labor in Colombia.

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