Child Labor and Forced Labor Reports

Cambodia

Alcoholic Beverages
Alcoholic Beverages
Child Labor Icon
Bovines
Bovines
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Bricks
Bricks
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Forced Labor Icon
Fish
Fish
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Manioc/Cassava
Manioc/Cassava
Child Labor Icon
Meat
Meat
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Rubber
Rubber
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Salt
Salt
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Shrimp
Shrimp
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Sugarcane
Sugarcane
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Textiles
Textiles
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Timber
Timber
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Tobacco
Tobacco
Child Labor Icon
Cambodia
2019 Findings on the Worst Forms of Child Labor:

Minimal Advancement – Efforts Made but Regression in Practice that Delayed Advancement

In 2019, Cambodia made a minimal advancement in efforts to eliminate the worst forms of child labor. The government, in conjunction with the ILO, conducted its first nationwide survey of child labor since 2012, with data scheduled for release in 2020. In addition, the government signed an agreement expanding funding to allow the International Labor Organization's Better Factories Cambodia program to extend its monitoring mandate to additional sectors, including to formal subcontracting factories where child labor is found. However, despite new initiatives to address child labor, Cambodia is receiving an assessment of minimal advancement because the government failed to take active measures to investigate, prosecute, convict, and sentence public officials who participate in or facilitate the worst forms of child labor, including commercial sexual exploitation of children and debt-based forced labor in brick kilns. In addition, during the reporting period, judges were allegedly reported to have accepted bribes in return for dismissal of charges, acquittal, and reduced sentencing for individuals committing such crimes, especially for those with alleged ties to the government; this made children more vulnerable to the worst forms of child labor. Children in Cambodia engage in the worst forms of child labor, including in forced labor in brickmaking and in commercial sexual exploitation, sometimes as a result of human trafficking. Insufficient resources may hamper the labor inspectorate's capacity to enforce child labor laws, especially in rural areas where the majority of child laborers work. In addition, continuing challenges in accessing basic education and the absence of a compulsory education requirement increase children's vulnerability to involvement in the worst forms of child labor.

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