Child Labor and Forced Labor Reports

Burma

Bamboo
Bamboo
Child Labor Icon
Forced Child Labor Icon
Forced Labor Icon
Beans (green, soy, yellow)
Beans (green, soy, yellow)
Child Labor Icon
Forced Child Labor Icon
Forced Labor Icon
Bricks
Bricks
Child Labor Icon
Forced Child Labor Icon
Forced Labor Icon
Garments
Garments
Child Labor Icon
Jade
Jade
Child Labor Icon
Forced Labor Icon
Palm Thatch
Palm Thatch
Forced Labor Icon
Rice
Rice
Child Labor Icon
Forced Child Labor Icon
Forced Labor Icon
Rubber
Rubber
Child Labor Icon
Forced Child Labor Icon
Forced Labor Icon
Rubies
Rubies
Child Labor Icon
Forced Labor Icon
Sesame
Sesame
Forced Labor Icon
Shrimp
Shrimp
Forced Labor Icon
Sugarcane
Sugarcane
Child Labor Icon
Forced Child Labor Icon
Forced Labor Icon
Sunflowers
Sunflowers
Forced Labor Icon
Teak
Teak
Child Labor Icon
Forced Child Labor Icon
Forced Labor Icon
Burma
2021 Findings on the Worst Forms of Child Labor:

No Advancement – Efforts Made But Complicit in Forced Child Labor

In 2021, Burma is receiving an assessment of no advancement. On February 1, 2021, Burma's military launched a coup and seized control of the state from the democratically elected civilian government. The return of a military regime and the resulting instability severely impacted the ability of Burma to fully engage in addressing the worst forms of child labor throughout the country. Burma is assessed as having made no advancement because it demonstrated a practice of being complicit in the use of forced child labor in more than isolated incidents. The national military continued to force civilians, including children, to work in non-combat roles as porters, cleaners, cooks, and agricultural laborers in conflict areas, including Rakhine, during the reporting period. While Burma took at least one step to address child labor--the drafting of a hazardous work list for children--the list was not published during the reporting period. Children in Burma are subjected to the worst forms of child labor, including in the forced recruitment of children for use in armed conflict and in commercial sexual exploitation, sometimes as a result of human trafficking. The vulnerability of Rohingya children to the worst forms of child labor remained high as many continued to be denied access to education and livelihoods because of restrictions on their movements imposed by the regime. Penalties for recruitment and use of children by the military, or for the military’s use of civilian populations for forced labor, are also not sufficient for the seriousness of the crime. In addition, the regime did not publicly release information on its labor law enforcement efforts.

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