Child Labor and Forced Labor Reports

Burma

Bamboo
Bamboo
Child Labor Icon
Forced Child Labor Icon
Forced Labor Icon
Beans (Green, Soy, Yellow)
Beans (Green, Soy, Yellow)
Child Labor Icon
Forced Child Labor Icon
Forced Labor Icon
Bricks
Bricks
Child Labor Icon
Forced Child Labor Icon
Forced Labor Icon
Garments
Garments
Child Labor Icon
Jade
Jade
Child Labor Icon
Forced Labor Icon
Palm Thatch
Palm Thatch
Forced Labor Icon
Rice
Rice
Child Labor Icon
Forced Child Labor Icon
Forced Labor Icon
Rubber
Rubber
Child Labor Icon
Forced Child Labor Icon
Forced Labor Icon
Rubies
Rubies
Child Labor Icon
Forced Labor Icon
Sesame
Sesame
Forced Labor Icon
Shrimp
Shrimp
Forced Labor Icon
Sugarcane
Sugarcane
Child Labor Icon
Forced Child Labor Icon
Forced Labor Icon
Sunflowers
Sunflowers
Forced Labor Icon
Teak
Teak
Child Labor Icon
Forced Child Labor Icon
Forced Labor Icon
Burma
2019 Findings on the Worst Forms of Child Labor:

No Advancement – Efforts Made But Complicit in Forced Child Labor

In 2019, Burma is receiving an assessment of no advancement. During the reporting period, the government enacted the Child Rights Law and established the National Committee for the Rights of the Child to institute the policies, guidelines, and measures needed to implement the law. It also ratified the United Nation’s Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Rights of the Child on the involvement of children in armed conflict and, in April 2019, released the results of the Labor Force Survey. Furthermore, the recruitment of children into the national armed forces for use in armed conflict declined markedly in 2019, due to positive steps taken by the government to work towards fully eliminating the recruitment of children into the national military. In June 2020, the United Nations delisted the national military for the violation of use and recruitment of child soldiers from Annex 1 of the annual Secretary General’s Report on Children and Armed Conflict. Despite these commendable efforts, however, Burma is receiving an assessment of no advancement because the national armed forces continued to force civilians, including at least 197 children, to work as porters, cleaners, cooks, and agricultural laborers in the conflict areas of Kachin, Rakhine, and Shan states during the reporting period, and made no known efforts to hold criminally accountable those military personnel involved in these practices. Children in Burma engage in the worst forms of child labor, including forced recruitment and use in armed conflict by non-state armed groups and commercial sexual exploitation, sometimes as a result of human trafficking. The vulnerability of Rohingya children to the worst forms of child labor also increased as many were denied access to education through government restrictions on their movement. Penalties for recruitment and use of children by the military or for the military’s use of civilian populations for forced labor are not sufficient for the seriousness of the crime, and the government did not publish information on criminal law enforcement efforts to investigate, prosecute, and convict cases involving the worst forms of child labor. Although the government provided anecdotal information on criminal law enforcement efforts to investigate, prosecute, and convict cases involving child labor through Facebook and the national media in 2019, it did not regularly publish comprehensive statistics on its efforts to address such crimes.

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