Child Labor and Forced Labor Reports

Brazil

Bananas
Bananas
Child Labor Icon
Beef
Beef
Child Labor Icon
Bricks
Bricks
Child Labor Icon
Cashews
Cashews
Child Labor Icon
Cattle
Cattle
Child Labor Icon
Forced Labor Icon
Ceramics
Ceramics
Child Labor Icon
Charcoal
Charcoal
Child Labor Icon
Forced Labor Icon
Cocoa
Cocoa
Child Labor Icon
Coffee
Coffee
Child Labor Icon
Corn
Corn
Child Labor Icon
Cotton
Cotton
Child Labor Icon
Fish
Fish
Child Labor Icon
Footwear
Footwear
Child Labor Icon
Garments
Garments
Forced Labor Icon
Hogs
Hogs
Child Labor Icon
Manioc/Cassava
Manioc/Cassava
Child Labor Icon
Pineapples
Pineapples
Child Labor Icon
Poultry
Poultry
Child Labor Icon
Rice
Rice
Child Labor Icon
Sheep
Sheep
Child Labor Icon
Sisal
Sisal
Child Labor Icon
Sugarcane
Sugarcane
Child Labor Icon
Forced Labor Icon
Timber
Timber
Forced Labor Icon
Tobacco
Tobacco
Child Labor Icon
Brazil
2018 Findings on the Worst Forms of Child Labor:

Moderate Advancement

In 2018, Brazil made a moderate advancement in efforts to eliminate the worst forms of child labor. In January 2018, the state of Ceará signed a law requiring businesses to publicly display signs highlighting the dangers of child labor and establishing administrative fines for those who violate the law, as well as those who fail to display the required signage. Furthermore, Brazilian police conducted the largest operation to date to combat child pornography, resulting in 89 arrests in more than 24 states. The number of children removed from situations of forced child labor increased by 40 percent, from 1,008 children in 2017 to 1,854 in 2018. The government also adopted its third National Plan to Eradicate Child Labor, and its third National Plan to Combat Human Trafficking. However, children in Brazil engage in the worst forms of child labor, including in commercial sexual exploitation. Children also engage in child labor in agriculture, including in the production of coffee. Although Brazil made meaningful efforts in all relevant areas during the reporting period, the government has not established legislation in compliance with international standards related to child trafficking. In addition, there are not enough labor inspectors to provide sufficient coverage of the workforce, and local governments lack the capacity to fully implement and monitor the National Program to Eradicate Child Labor, Bolsa Família, and other social protection programs.

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