Child Labor and Forced Labor Reports

Brazil

Bananas
Bananas
Child Labor Icon
Beef
Beef
Child Labor Icon
Bricks
Bricks
Child Labor Icon
Cashews
Cashews
Child Labor Icon
Cattle
Cattle
Child Labor Icon
Forced Labor Icon
Ceramics
Ceramics
Child Labor Icon
Charcoal
Charcoal
Child Labor Icon
Forced Labor Icon
Cocoa
Cocoa
Child Labor Icon
Coffee
Coffee
Child Labor Icon
Forced Labor Icon
Corn
Corn
Child Labor Icon
Cotton
Cotton
Child Labor Icon
Fish
Fish
Child Labor Icon
Footwear
Footwear
Child Labor Icon
Garments
Garments
Forced Labor Icon
Hogs
Hogs
Child Labor Icon
Manioc/Cassava
Manioc/Cassava
Child Labor Icon
Pineapples
Pineapples
Child Labor Icon
Poultry
Poultry
Child Labor Icon
Rice
Rice
Child Labor Icon
Sheep
Sheep
Child Labor Icon
Sisal
Sisal
Child Labor Icon
Sugarcane
Sugarcane
Child Labor Icon
Forced Labor Icon
Timber
Timber
Forced Labor Icon
Tobacco
Tobacco
Child Labor Icon
Brazil
2019 Findings on the Worst Forms of Child Labor:

Moderate Advancement

In 2019, Brazil made a moderate advancement in efforts to eliminate the worst forms of child labor. The government published two updated versions of the national “Dirty List” containing information on employers that the Ministry of Economy has found to be using slave labor, including that of children. The Labor Prosecution Service and the Federal Police also signed a 3-year technical cooperation agreement to combat child labor and forced labor, with the aim of increasing both agencies' technical capacity, while also providing access to each other's databases for more efficient information exchange. In addition, national, state, and local governments conducted a wide range of awareness-raising campaigns throughout the year, including a national meeting on combating child labor during which participants collaborated on a coordinating agenda to better promote education and combat child labor. Moreover, the Labor Prosecutor’s Office and the Labor Inspection Unit at the Ministry of Economy promoted the Fourth National Apprenticeship Week, a program that has significantly contributed in reducing child labor in the country, and the Ministry of Social Development in Pernambuco State assisted 8,932 victims of child labor. However, children in Brazil engage in the worst forms of child labor, including in commercial sexual exploitation, sometimes as a result of human trafficking. Children also engage in child labor in agriculture, including in the production of coffee. Although Brazil made meaningful efforts in all relevant areas during the reporting period, prohibitions against child trafficking require the use of threats, violence, coercion, fraud, or abuse to be established for the crime of child trafficking and, therefore, do not meet international labor standards. In addition, there are likely not enough labor inspectors to provide sufficient coverage of the workforce, and local governments lack the capacity to fully implement and monitor the National Program to Eradicate Child Labor, the family stipend program Bolsa Família, and other social protection programs.

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