Child Labor and Forced Labor Reports

Brazil

Bananas
Bananas
Child Labor Icon
Beef
Beef
Child Labor Icon
Bricks
Bricks
Child Labor Icon
Cashews
Cashews
Child Labor Icon
Cattle
Cattle
Child Labor Icon
Forced Labor Icon
Ceramics
Ceramics
Child Labor Icon
Charcoal
Charcoal
Child Labor Icon
Forced Labor Icon
Cocoa
Cocoa
Child Labor Icon
Coffee
Coffee
Child Labor Icon
Forced Labor Icon
Corn
Corn
Child Labor Icon
Cotton
Cotton
Child Labor Icon
Fish
Fish
Child Labor Icon
Footwear
Footwear
Child Labor Icon
Garments
Garments
Forced Labor Icon
Hogs
Hogs
Child Labor Icon
Manioc/Cassava
Manioc/Cassava
Child Labor Icon
Pineapples
Pineapples
Child Labor Icon
Poultry
Poultry
Child Labor Icon
Rice
Rice
Child Labor Icon
Sheep
Sheep
Child Labor Icon
Sisal
Sisal
Child Labor Icon
Sugarcane
Sugarcane
Child Labor Icon
Forced Labor Icon
Timber
Timber
Forced Labor Icon
Tobacco
Tobacco
Child Labor Icon
Brazil
2020 Findings on the Worst Forms of Child Labor:

Moderate Advancement

In 2020, Brazil made moderate advancement in efforts to eliminate the worst forms of child labor. The government published two updated versions of the national "Dirty List" containing information on employers that the Ministry of Economy had found to be using slave labor, including that of children. The Labor Prosecutor's Office, the Federal Highway Police, and the Brazilian Association for the Defense of Women, Children, and Youth signed an agreement to incorporate human trafficking issues in the Mapear Project, which maps points along Brazil's federal highways that are high risk for the sexual exploitation of children and adolescents. Moreover, the National Commission for the Prevention and Eradication of Child Labor was re-established after its dismantlement in 2019, and the government approved a constitutional amendment to increase support for the Fund for the Maintenance and Development of Basic Education and the Appreciation of Teaching Professionals, with the aim of leveling the amount spent per student, per year, across the country. The government also secured a $1 billion loan for Bolsa Família to provide benefits to 3 million more participants, including 990,000 children. However, children in Brazil are subjected to the worst forms of child labor, including in commercial sexual exploitation, sometimes as a result of human trafficking. Children also engage in child labor in agriculture, including in the production of coffee. Although Brazil made meaningful efforts in all relevant areas during the reporting period, prohibitions against child trafficking require the use of threats, violence, coercion, fraud, or abuse to be established for the crime of child trafficking and, therefore, do not meet international labor standards. Furthermore, the reported number of labor inspectors is likely not sufficient to provide adequate coverage of the workforce, and local governments lack the capacity to fully implement and monitor the National Program to Eradicate Child Labor and other social protection programs.

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