Child Labor and Forced Labor Reports

Bolivia

Brazil Nuts/Chestnuts
Brazil Nuts/Chestnuts
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Forced Child Labor Icon
Forced Labor Icon
Bricks
Bricks
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Cattle
Cattle
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Corn
Corn
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Forced Labor Icon
Gold
Gold
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Peanuts
Peanuts
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Silver
Silver
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Sugarcane
Sugarcane
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Forced Child Labor Icon
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Tin
Tin
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Zinc
Zinc
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Bolivia
2018 Findings on the Worst Forms of Child Labor:

Moderate Advancement

In 2018, Bolivia made a moderate advancement in efforts to eliminate the worst forms of child labor. Following the Plurinational Constitutional Tribunal (TCP) decision that ruled unconstitutional provisions of the 2014 Child and Adolescent Code which allowed children as young as 10 years old to work, in December 2018 President Evo Morales signed complementary legislation that further clarified the minimum age of 14 years. The legislation eliminated remaining provisions that permitted children to work at ages 12 and 13. The labor inspectorate also increased the number of labor inspectors, mobile inspection units, and the number of inspections conducted throughout the year. In addition, the major sugar-producing Department of Santa Cruz addressed child labor in the sector through several social programs. However, children in Bolivia engage in the worst forms of child labor, including in mining and commercial sexual exploitation, sometimes as a result of human trafficking. Children also perform dangerous tasks in agriculture. Although Bolivian law requires that apprentices attend school, it does not set a minimum age for participation in apprenticeships. In addition, Article 1 of Supreme Decree No. 1875 sets the minimum age for compulsory military service at 17 years, which does not comply with international standards.

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