Child Labor and Forced Labor Reports

Bolivia

Brazil Nuts/Chestnuts
Brazil Nuts/Chestnuts
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Forced Child Labor Icon
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Bricks
Bricks
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Cattle
Cattle
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Corn
Corn
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Gold
Gold
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Peanuts
Peanuts
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Silver
Silver
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Sugarcane
Sugarcane
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Forced Child Labor Icon
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Tin
Tin
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Zinc
Zinc
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Bolivia
2019 Findings on the Worst Forms of Child Labor:

Moderate Advancement

In 2019, Bolivia made a moderate advancement in efforts to eliminate the worst forms of child labor. The Ministry of Justice trained judges and prosecuting attorneys on conducting trials in cases of human trafficking. In addition, the government carried out anti-human trafficking awareness campaigns to educate students throughout the country, and the Ombudsman's Office published an evaluation of its efforts to prevent trafficking of children and adolescents, identifying key areas for improvement. However, children in Bolivia engage in the worst forms of child labor, including in commercial sexual exploitation, sometimes as a result of human trafficking, and in mining. Children also perform dangerous tasks in agriculture, including in the production of sugarcane. Although Bolivian law requires that apprentices attend school, it does not set a minimum age for participation in apprenticeships. In addition, Article 1 of Supreme Decree No. 1875 sets the minimum age for compulsory military service at 17 years, which does not comply with international standards. During the reporting period, political crisis and the implementation of a transitional government may have affected efforts to eradicate the worst forms of child labor. 

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