Child Labor and Forced Labor Reports

Bangladesh

Bidis (Hand-Rolled Cigarettes)
Bidis (Hand-Rolled Cigarettes)
Child Labor Icon
Bricks
Bricks
Child Labor Icon
Dried Fish
Dried Fish
Child Labor Icon
Forced Child Labor Icon
Forced Labor Icon
Footwear
Footwear
Child Labor Icon
Furniture (Steel)
Furniture (Steel)
Child Labor Icon
Garments
Garments
Child Labor Icon
Glass
Glass
Child Labor Icon
Leather
Leather
Child Labor Icon
Matches
Matches
Child Labor Icon
Poultry
Poultry
Child Labor Icon
Salt
Salt
Child Labor Icon
Shrimp
Shrimp
Child Labor Icon
Soap
Soap
Child Labor Icon
Textiles
Textiles
Child Labor Icon
Textiles (Jute)
Textiles (Jute)
Child Labor Icon
Bangladesh
2018 Findings on the Worst Forms of Child Labor:

Moderate Advancement

In 2018, Bangladesh made a moderate advancement in efforts to eliminate the worst forms of child labor. The government launched a $35 million, 3-year project to eliminate hazardous child labor by identifying and rehabilitating 100,000 child laborers. In addition, the Bangladesh Army and Rapid Action Battalion were deployed to assist in the identification and investigation of trafficking and smuggling cases among Rohingya refugees. The government also adopted a five-year National Plan of Action for the Prevention and Suppression of Human Trafficking. However, children in Bangladesh engage in the worst forms of child labor, including forced child labor in the production of dried fish and bricks. Children also perform dangerous tasks in the production of garments and leather goods. Laws do not cover children working in the informal sector, and hazardous work prohibitions are not comprehensive. Moreover, the number of labor inspectors is insufficient for the size of Bangladesh’s workforce, and fines are too low to deter child labor law violations.

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