Child Labor and Forced Labor Reports

Afghanistan

Bricks
Bricks
Child Labor Icon
Forced Child Labor Icon
Forced Labor Icon
Carpets
Carpets
Child Labor Icon
Coal
Coal
Child Labor Icon
Flowers (Poppies)
Flowers (Poppies)
Child Labor Icon
Salt
Salt
Child Labor Icon
Afghanistan
2019 Findings on the Worst Forms of Child Labor:

No Advancement – Efforts Made But Complicit in Forced Child Labor

In 2019, Afghanistan is receiving an assessment of no advancement. Despite initiatives to address child labor, Afghanistan is receiving an assessment of no advancement because government officials, particularly officers of the Afghan Local Police and Afghan National Police, were complicit in the use of commercial sexual exploitation of boys through the practice of bacha bazi, a practice that remains widespread throughout the country. The government failed to prosecute any government officials in bacha bazi cases in 2019, but convicted two civilians and indicted at least four others. During the reporting period, media reported allegations by human rights activists that at least 165 boys were sexually exploited at three public high schools in Logar Province, with the perpetrators video recording some of the acts for blackmail purposes. The activists’ research found evidence of involvement of dozens of educators, including teachers and principals. At the end of 2019, government investigators reported that while they uncovered evidence of child sexual assault in Logar, they had found no link between the abuse and educators in the Logar public school system. Two human rights activists who exposed the Logar network, however, were detained by the National Directorate of Security, physically mistreated, and subsequently fled the country with their families after receiving death threats. Although the government failed to prosecute Afghan Local Police or Afghan National Police officers implicated in bacha bazi crimes, it took a number of steps to combat bacha bazi and other forms of child labor and child trafficking, including establishing a National Child Protection Commission. However, children in Afghanistan engage in the worst forms of child labor, including in armed conflict and forced labor in the production of bricks and carpets, each sometimes the result of human trafficking. Afghanistan’s labor inspectorate is not authorized to impose penalties for child labor violations, and the government lacks sufficient programs to eliminate the worst forms of child labor. In addition, Afghan law does not sufficiently criminalize forced labor, debt bondage, or commercial sexual exploitation of girls.

Want this report plus over a thousand pages of research in the palm of
your hand? Download ILAB's Sweat & Toil App today!