Child Labor and Forced Labor Reports

Congo, Democratic Republic of the (DRC)

Cobalt Ore (Heterogenite)
Cobalt Ore (Heterogenite)
Child Labor Icon
Copper
Copper
Child Labor Icon
Diamonds
Diamonds
Child Labor Icon
Gold
Gold
Child Labor Icon
Forced Child Labor Icon
Forced Labor Icon
Tantalum Ore (Coltan)
Tantalum Ore (Coltan)
Child Labor Icon
Forced Child Labor Icon
Forced Labor Icon
Tin Ore (Cassiterite)
Tin Ore (Cassiterite)
Child Labor Icon
Forced Child Labor Icon
Forced Labor Icon
Tungsten Ore (Wolframite)
Tungsten Ore (Wolframite)
Child Labor Icon
Forced Child Labor Icon
Forced Labor Icon
Congo, Democratic Republic of the (DRC)
2020 Findings on the Worst Forms of Child Labor:

Moderate Advancement

In 2020, the Democratic Republic of the Congo made moderate advancement in efforts to eliminate the worst forms of child labor. The national anti-trafficking coordinating body successfully prosecuted several cases of forced child labor, human trafficking, and commercial sexual exploitation. The Ministry of Defense also issued a zero-tolerance policy for child recruitment, and the Armed Forces of the Democratic Republic of the Congo identified and began prosecuting an army officer responsible for operating a child trafficking ring. Moreover, the government's universal primary education decree continued to reduce the number of children vulnerable to labor exploitation and the government task force on the Africa Growth and Opportunity Act, in conjunction with the Ministry of Employment, Labor, and Social Welfare, published a manual to address child labor in the Democratic Republic of the Congo's agricultural sector. However, children in the Democratic Republic of the Congo are subjected to the worst forms of child labor, including in the forced mining of gold, tin ore (cassiterite), tantalum ore (coltan), and tungsten ore (wolframite), and are used in armed conflict, sometimes as a result of forcible recruitment or abduction by non-state armed groups. Although the government made meaningful efforts in all relevant areas during the reporting period, it did not publish labor or criminal law enforcement data. The government also failed to take active measures to ensure that children are not inappropriately incarcerated, penalized, or physically harmed solely for unlawful acts as a direct result of being a victim of the worst forms of child labor. Other gaps remain, including a lack of trained enforcement personnel, limited financial resources, and poor coordination of government efforts to combat child labor.

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