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Wage and Hour Division (WHD)

(September 2013) (PDF)

Fact Sheet #79F: Paid Family or Household Members in Certain Medicaid-Funded and Certain Other Publicly Funded Programs Offering Home Care Services Under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA)

This fact sheet provides general information regarding how the FLSA’s requirements apply to the employment of a family or household member paid through certain Medicaid-funded and certain other publicly funded programs offering home care services.

Who are paid family or household care providers?

Certain Medicaid-funded and certain other publicly funded programs allow a recipient of home care services (or that person’s representative) to select and supervise the care provider and further allow the selection of a family or household member of that person as a paid care provider.

Under these programs, the particular services to be provided and the number of hours of paid work are described in a written agreement, usually called a “plan of care,” developed and approved by the program after an assessment of the services the recipient of care requires and that person’s existing supports, such as unpaid assistance provided by family or household members.

What is the significance of an FLSA employment relationship?

The FLSA requires, among other things, the payment of minimum wage and overtime compensation to all workers who are employees, i.e., who are in an employment relationship with an employer. See Fact Sheet #13: Employment Relationship Under the Fair Labor Standards Act. Under the FLSA, family or household members can be hired as employees of other family or household members to provide home care services, creating an employment relationship. If such an employment relationship is created, it is subject to the requirements of the FLSA.

Ordinarily, under the FLSA, including in the context of domestic service work such as home care, if an employment relationship exists, all hours worked by an employee for an employer must be paid. See Fact Sheet #79D: Hours Worked Applicable to Domestic Service Employment Under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA). For example, if an elderly person hires a certified nursing assistant (CNA) to provide medical care in her home and the elderly person and CNA agree that the CNA will work and be paid for 30 hours per week, if the CNA actually works for 35 hours in a given week, she must be paid for all 35 hours.

What is the scope of a paid family or household care provider’s FLSA employment relationship?

When a paid care provider is a family or household member of the person receiving home care services, the decision to hire the family or household member does not turn all care provided into employment. There is both a familial or household relationship and an employment relationship, and only hours worked within the scope of the employment relationship are covered by the FLSA. In these circumstances, the employment relationship is limited by a “plan of care” or other written agreement developed with the involvement and approval of the

Medicaid-funded or certain other program if that agreement reasonably defines the hours for which paid care services will be provided.

For example, a familial relationship, but not an employment relationship, exists where a father assists his adult, physically disabled son with eating dinner and bathing in the evenings. If the son enrolled in a Medicaid-funded or certain other publicly funded program and the father became his son’s paid care provider under a program-approved plan of care that funded eight hours per day of services, the father would then also be in an employment relationship with his son for purposes of the FLSA. If the requirements described below are met, the father’s employment relationship with his son extends only to the eight hours per day of paid work contemplated in the plan of care. The assistance he provides at other times stems from his familial relationship and is not part of that employment relationship and therefore need not be paid. If, based on the structure of the program, a state or other agency was also an employer of the father, see Fact Sheet #79E: Joint Employment in Domestic Service Employment Under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA), this interpretation would also apply to the employment relationship between the father and that agency.

What are the requirements for the application of this special interpretation limiting the scope of the employment relationship of paid family and household care providers?

(1) Home Care In or About a Private Home

This unique interpretation only applies in the home care service context. Under the FLSA, home care is domestic service employment because workers are providing services of a household nature in or about a private home. See Fact Sheet #79 Private Homes and Domestic Service Employment Under the Fair Labor Standards Act. Work done by family or household members in other contexts, such as for a family business, is subject to the typical FLSA law and regulations regarding the employment relationship and hours worked.

(2) Family or Household Relationship

This unique interpretation also does not generally apply to relationships that do not involve preexisting family ties or a preexisting shared household. Therefore, except as noted below, it would not apply to a direct care worker who did not have a family or a household relationship with the individual in need of services prior to the individual’s need arising or the creation of the plan of care. In other words, all services provided by a direct care worker who becomes so close to the consumer as to be “like family,” or a direct care worker who becomes part of the consumer’s household when hired to be a live-in employee, must be paid pursuant to typical FLSA law and regulations. If the consumer and caregiver enter into a new family relationship during the course of an employment relationship (e.g., through marriage or civil union), however, then the FLSA employment relationship would be limited even though the family relationship did not predate the employment relationship.

(3) Reasonableness of the Plan of Care

An employment relationship is limited to the paid hours contemplated in the plan of care or other written agreement developed and approved by certain Medicaid-funded or certain other publicly funded home care programs only if that agreement is reasonable. A determination of reasonableness will take into account whether the plan of care would have included the same number of paid hours if the care provider had not been a family or household member of the consumer. In other words, a plan of care that reflects unequal treatment of a care provider because of his or her familial or household relationship with the consumer is not reasonable. For instance, the program may not reduce the number of paid hours in a plan of care because the selected care provider is a family or household member. In addition, a program may not require an increase in the hours of unpaid services performed by the family or household care provider in order to reduce the number of hours of paid services.

For example, an older woman who can no longer care for herself enrolls in a Medicaid-funded program administered by the county in which she lives. She is assessed to need paid services for 30 hours per week beyond the existing unpaid assistance she receives from her daughter and other relatives. If the hours in the plan of care are reduced by the county to 15 hours per week because the woman’s daughter is hired as the paid care provider, the paid hours in the plan of care will not determine the scope of the FLSA employment relationship.

Additional Resources and Relevant Information

For more information about the Fair Labor Standards Act, and in particular, how it applies in the context of home care and other domestic services provided in or about a private home, please see the following resources:

Fact Sheet: Final Rule Concerning Domestic Service Workers Under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA)

Fact Sheet #79: Private Homes and Domestic Service Under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA)

Fact Sheet # 79A: Companionship Services Under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA)

Fact Sheet #79B: Live-In Domestic Service Workers Under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA)

Fact Sheet #79C: Recordkeeping Requirements for Individuals, Families, or Households who Employ Domestic Service Workers Under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA)

Fact Sheet #79D: Hours Worked Applicable to Domestic Service Employment Under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA)

Fact Sheet #79E: Joint Employment in Domestic Service Employment Under the Fair Labor Standards Act Service Workers Under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA)

For additional information, visit our Wage and Hour Division Website: http://www.wagehour.dol.gov and/or call our toll-free information and helpline, available 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. in your time zone, 1-866-4USWAGE (1-866-487-9243).

This publication is for general information and is not to be considered in the same light as official statements of position contained in the Department’s regulations.