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Military Spouses Frequently Asked Questions

The Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs (OFCCP) supports and honors our veterans by supporting military spouses in employment. The Vietnam Era Veterans’ Readjustment Assistance Act’s (VEVRAA) implementing regulations prohibit federal contractors from discriminating in employment on the basis of veteran status – a protection that includes not only protected veterans but also their spouses and other family members.

  1. What is VEVRAA?
  2. Does VEVRAA protect all veterans?
  3. Does VEVRAA also apply to veterans who served before or after the Vietnam era?
  4. How does VEVRAA protect the spouses of protected veterans?
  5. How else does the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) provide support to military spouses?
  6. My job requires a state-issued license and certificate, but the military is moving my spouse to another state. Will my license and certificate transfer to our new state?

 


 

1. What is VEVRAA

VEVRAA is a federal law, portions of which are enforced by OFCCP. VEVRAA and its implementing regulations require federal contractors and subcontractors to take affirmative action to employ and advance in employment qualified, protected veterans and to not discriminate against those veterans.

 


 

2. Does VEVRAA protect all veterans?

Under VEVRAA, the term "protected veterans" includes four categories of veterans: disabled veterans, recently separated veterans, active duty wartime or campaign badge veterans, and Armed Forces service medal veterans. For more information on who is covered by these categories, please reference the "Am I a Protected Veteran" infographic on OFCCP’s web page here.

 


 

3. Does VEVRAA also apply to veterans who served before or after the Vietnam era?

Yes. While the original law was enacted during the Vietnam War, the law as amended covers many categories of veterans serving at other times in our history. For example, "recently separated veterans" covers veterans who are within three years of their discharge or release from active duty. In addition, an "active duty wartime or campaign badge veteran" includes veterans who served on active duty in the U.S. military during a "period of war" recognized by statute. These "periods of war" include the Korean conflict, the Vietnam era, and the Persian Gulf War, which by statute extends from August 1990 to the present.

 


 

4. How does VEVRAA protect the spouses of protected veterans?

It is unlawful for a federal contractor to discriminate in employment on the basis of veteran status against a qualified individual who the contractor knows to be the spouse of a protected veteran. See 41 CFR ยง60‐300.21(e). This protection extends not only to spouses, but also to other individuals that the contractor knows has a family, business, social or other relationship or association with a protected veteran.

 


 

5. How else does the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) provide support to military spouses?

The Veterans’ Employment and Training Service (VETS), an agency in DOL, also provides resources for protected veterans and their spouses, including an online portal designed specifically for military spouses. VETS’ mission is to prepare veterans, service members, and their spouses for meaningful careers, provide them with employment resources, protect their employment rights, and promote their employment opportunities. Visit the VETS homepage for more information.

 


 

6. My job requires a state‐issued license and certificate, but the military is moving my spouse to another state. Will my license and certificate transfer to our new state?

Many states have laws to make it easier for military spouses relocating from out of state to receive temporary and/or permanent occupational licenses in their new state. You can use a web‐based map and license finder tool provided by VETS to learn where to apply for an occupational license in a new state. You can search by occupation, job title, license name, or state agency.