Skip to page content
Secretary of Labor Thomas E. Perez
Bookmark and Share

Photo Gallery: Artists of the Farm Worker Movement
(April 5, 2012)

Images include:

  • 'Tierra Nuestra' silkscreen by Malaquias Montoya, 2004. Courtesy of the Gilberto Cárdenas Latino Art Collection: Sponsored by the Institute for Latino Studies at the University of Notre Dame.
  • 'Dolores' serigraph by Barbara Carrasco, 1999.
  • 'Piscando en Pajaro' silkscreen by Juan Fuentes, 1994. Courtesy of the Gilberto Cárdenas Latino Art Collection: Sponsored by the Institute for Latino Studies at the University of Notre Dame.
  • 'Nopalitos (State II)' linoleum block by Carmen Lomas Garza, 1992. Courtesy of the Gilberto Cárdenas Latino Art Collection: Sponsored by the Institute for Latino Studies at the University of Notre Dame.
  • 'Sun Mad' screenprint on paper by Ester Hernández, 1981.
  • 'El Malcriado' is the farm workers' underground newspaper that was first printed and distributed in Delano, CA in 1964. The name of the paper, founded by Dolores Huerta and César Chávez means 'ill-bred or mischievous' or 'children who speak back to their parents.' The name had resonance with many farm workers because during the Mexican revolution, there had been a newspaper with the same name. Printed in English and Spanish, Chávez used El Malcriado to criticize the growers for low wages, poor working conditions and the use of pesticides; all very serious issues of the farm workers. Andy Zermeño was the principle artist at the inception of the newspaper. Courtesy of Elaine F. Graves.
  • Image of César Chávez from 'Arch of Dignity, Equality and Justice' at San José State University by Judith F. Baca.
  • Image of Dolores Huerta from 'Arch of Dignity, Equality and Justice' at San José State University by Judith F. Baca.
  • 'Recuerdos de Ayer, Sueños de Mañana' mural by Judithe Hernández,, 1982. Exterior of the Beaudry Building in downtown Los Angeles, CA. The artist was assisted by Peter C. Hernandez (her father), Carlos Almaraz, Stanley Wilson, and Kent Twitchell. Courtesy of The Mural Conservancy of Los Angeles.
  • Grape Boycott in East Los Angeles, CA. Photographs by Dr. Gilberto Cardénas. Courtesy of the Gilberto Cárdenas Latino Art Collection: Sponsored by the Institute for Latino Studies at the University of Notre Dame.
  • Lettuce Boycott in South Bend, IN. Photographs by Dr. Gilberto Cardénas. Courtesy of the Gilberto Cárdenas Latino Art Collection: Sponsored by the Institute for Latino Studies at the University of Notre Dame.
  • In 1966, the Chávez-led National Farm Workers Association (NFWA) and the Filipino American Agricultural Workers Organizing Committee (AWOC) merged to form the United Farm Workers (UFW) and the union affiliates with the AFL-CIO, the national labor federation. Courtesy of Wayne State University UFW Archives.
  • In March 1968, then-Senator Robert F. Kennedy joined 8,000 farm workers and supporters at a Catholic Mass where Chávez broke his 25-day fast, which he dedicated to the principals of non-violence practiced by M.K. Gandhi and Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Senator Kennedy called the weakened farm labor leader 'one of the heroic figures of our time.' Courtesy of Wayne State University UFW Archives.
  • California Governor Jerry Brown delivers remarks at a UFW Convention after outlawing El Cortito, 'the short one,' a hoe that was only twenty-four inches long, forcing the farmworkers who used it to bend and stoop all day long—a position that often led to lifelong, debilitating back injuries. Courtesy of Wayne State University UFW Archives.

Images include:

  • 'Tierra Nuestra' silkscreen by Malaquias Montoya, 2004. Courtesy of the Gilberto Cárdenas Latino Art Collection: Sponsored by the Institute for Latino Studies at the University of Notre Dame.
  • 'Dolores' serigraph by Barbara Carrasco, 1999.
  • 'Piscando en Pajaro' silkscreen by Juan Fuentes, 1994. Courtesy of the Gilberto Cárdenas Latino Art Collection: Sponsored by the Institute for Latino Studies at the University of Notre Dame.
  • 'Nopalitos (State II)' linoleum block by Carmen Lomas Garza, 1992. Courtesy of the Gilberto Cárdenas Latino Art Collection: Sponsored by the Institute for Latino Studies at the University of Notre Dame.
  • 'Sun Mad' screenprint on paper by Ester Hernández, 1981.
  • 'El Malcriado' is the farm workers' underground newspaper that was first printed and distributed in Delano, CA in 1964. The name of the paper, founded by Dolores Huerta and César Chávez means 'ill-bred or mischievous' or 'children who speak back to their parents.' The name had resonance with many farm workers because during the Mexican revolution, there had been a newspaper with the same name. Printed in English and Spanish, Chávez used El Malcriado to criticize the growers for low wages, poor working conditions and the use of pesticides; all very serious issues of the farm workers. Andy Zermeño was the principle artist at the inception of the newspaper. Courtesy of Elaine F. Graves.
  • Image of César Chávez from 'Arch of Dignity, Equality and Justice' at San José State University by Judith F. Baca.
  • Image of Dolores Huerta from 'Arch of Dignity, Equality and Justice' at San José State University by Judith F. Baca.
  • 'Recuerdos de Ayer, Sueños de Mañana' mural by Judithe Hernández,, 1982. Exterior of the Beaudry Building in downtown Los Angeles, CA. The artist was assisted by Peter C. Hernandez (her father), Carlos Almaraz, Stanley Wilson, and Kent Twitchell. Courtesy of The Mural Conservancy of Los Angeles.
  • Grape Boycott in East Los Angeles, CA. Photographs by Dr. Gilberto Cardénas. Courtesy of the Gilberto Cárdenas Latino Art Collection: Sponsored by the Institute for Latino Studies at the University of Notre Dame.
  • Lettuce Boycott in South Bend, IN. Photographs by Dr. Gilberto Cardénas. Courtesy of the Gilberto Cárdenas Latino Art Collection: Sponsored by the Institute for Latino Studies at the University of Notre Dame.
  • In 1966, the Chávez-led National Farm Workers Association (NFWA) and the Filipino American Agricultural Workers Organizing Committee (AWOC) merged to form the United Farm Workers (UFW) and the union affiliates with the AFL-CIO, the national labor federation. Courtesy of Wayne State University UFW Archives.
  • In March 1968, then-Senator Robert F. Kennedy joined 8,000 farm workers and supporters at a Catholic Mass where Chávez broke his 25-day fast, which he dedicated to the principals of non-violence practiced by M.K. Gandhi and Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Senator Kennedy called the weakened farm labor leader 'one of the heroic figures of our time.' Courtesy of Wayne State University UFW Archives.
  • California Governor Jerry Brown delivers remarks at a UFW Convention after outlawing El Cortito, 'the short one,' a hoe that was only twenty-four inches long, forcing the farmworkers who used it to bend and stoop all day long—a position that often led to lifelong, debilitating back injuries. Courtesy of Wayne State University UFW Archives.