List of Goods Produced by Child Labor or Forced Labor

ILAB maintains a list of goods and their source countries which it has reason to believe are produced by child labor or forced labor in violation of international standards, as required under the Trafficking Victims Protection Reauthorization Act (TVPRA) of 2005 and subsequent reauthorizations. As of September 20, 2018, the List of Goods Produced by Child Labor or Forced Labor comprises 148 goods from 76 countries.

ILAB maintains the List primarily to raise public awareness about forced labor and child labor around the world and to promote efforts to combat them; it is not intended to be punitive, but rather to serve as a catalyst for more strategic and focused coordination and collaboration among those working to address these problems.  

Publication of the List has resulted in new opportunities for ILAB to engage with foreign governments to combat forced labor and child labor. It is also a valuable resource for researchers, advocacy organizations and companies wishing to carry out risk assessments and engage in due diligence on labor rights in their supply chains.

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The countries on the List span every region of the world. The most common agricultural goods listed are sugarcane, cotton, coffee, tobacco, cattle, rice, and fish. In the manufacturing sector, bricks, garments, textiles, footwear, carpets, and fireworks appear most frequently. In mined or quarried goods, gold, coal and diamonds are most common.

ILAB released its initial TVPRA List in 2009, and updated it annually through 2014, following a set of procedural guidelines that were the product of an intensive public consultation process. ILAB now updates and publishes the List every other year, pursuant to changes in the law.

Procedural Guidelines

On October 1, 2007, OCFT published a Federal Register Notice [Text] [PDF] containing proposed Procedural Guidelines for the development and maintenance of the List of Goods from countries produced by child labor or forced labor in violation of international standards. ILAB received nine public comments on the proposed Procedural Guidelines. These comments and ILAB's responses, along with the final Procedural Guidelines, were published in a Federal Register Notice on December 27, 2007: 



Show
items
Country Goodssort descending Exploitation Type
Cambodia Alcoholic Beverages  Child Labor
Ukraine Amber 

There are reports that children as young as 7 engage in illegal amber extraction in Ukraine. Children from low-income families in the Polesia region of western Ukraine, including in Rivne, Volyn, and Zhytomyr Oblasts, are particularly vulnerable to involvement in amber extraction. For example, one human rights organization reports that thousands of school children extract amber, and that their labor is essential to the amber industry. According to media reports and local government officials, child labor is systemic in the illegal amber extraction industry and is a growing problem. The amber extraction process creates large pits and exposes children to risk of injuries when extraction pits collapse. Children engaged in illegal amber extraction are also at risk of violence at the mining site.
Ukrainian Translation

Child Labor
China Artificial Flowers  Forced Labor
Dominican Republic Baked Goods  Child Labor
El Salvador Baked Goods 

There is evidence that children ages 5 to 17 are engaged in the production of baked goods in El Salvador. According to the Government of El Salvador’s Multi-Purpose Household Survey of 2015, a working child is considered to be engaged in hazardous child labor if the child is performing work that is hazardous according to national legislation. The survey estimates that 123,259 children ages 5 to 17 perform hazardous child labor in El Salvador, including using dangerous tools, carrying heavy loads, working with chemicals, working long or night shifts, and being exposed to dust, smoke, or extreme heat or humidity. Approximately 9,737 of these children in hazardous child labor are engaged in the production of baked goods. The release of this survey demonstrates the Government of El Salvador’s commitment to addressing child labor and its acknowledgement that data collection is vital to the design and implementation of sound policies and programs.
Spanish Translation

Child Labor
Burma Bamboo 

There are reports that children as young as age 10 are forced to work in the production of bamboo in Burma. According to the ILO and NGOs, forced child labor is pervasive, particularly in Karen, Shan, and Arakan States near military camps, with children constituting up to 40 percent of forced laborers being used for a variety of activities, including the production of bamboo. Some of these children are sent by their families to fulfill a mandate imposed by the military that requires each household in a village to undertake specified forced labor activities. Villagers, including children, are forced by local officials and the military to work cutting bamboo for the military camps. The forced child laborers are not paid for their work, and face physical violence or other punishment if they refuse to work.
Burmese Translation

Forced Labor, Child Labor
Brazil Bananas 

There is evidence that children ages 5 to 13 cultivate bananas in Brazil. The Government of Brazil’s 2015 National Household Survey considers all work performed by children below age 14 to be child labor. Based on an analysis of the survey, an estimated 2,936 child laborers cultivate bananas. The ILO has found that generally children who work in agriculture may be at risk of exposure to hazards including, working long hours, carrying heavy loads, using dangerous tools, and exposure to the elements, physical injuries, and chemicals, such as pesticides. The release of this survey demonstrates the Government of Brazil’s commitment to addressing child labor and its acknowledgement that data collection is vital to the design and implementation of sound policies and programs.
Portuguese Translation

Child Labor
Belize Bananas  Child Labor
Ecuador Bananas  Child Labor
Nicaragua Bananas  Child Labor

Pages

Country Good Exploitation Type
Afghanistan Carpets Child Labor
Afghanistan Coal Child Labor
Afghanistan Poppies Child Labor
Afghanistan Bricks

There are reports that children as young as age four in Afghanistan are working in conditions of forced labor and in debt bondage at brick kilns. Based on the most recently available data from non-governmental organizations (NGOs) and media sources, up to 200 children were working at each of the 90 kilns in the Surkhrod District and more than 2,200 children were working as debt bonded laborers in 38 brick factories in Nangarhar Province in eastern Afghanistan. These children are bound by their parents' debt and work alongside their families making bricks. The bonded families are required to work under a contract between the families and the kiln owners; under the contracts, workers can be bought and sold among kiln owners. Some children are held at the kiln as collateral for their parents' debt, and will inherit their parents' outstanding debt.
Dari Translation

Forced Labor, Child Labor
Afghanistan Salt

There are reports that children ages 8-17 produce salt in Afghanistan. According to media reports, hundreds of children work in salt mines, with one source confirming nearly 400 children found at the Taqcha Khana mine in the Namakab district of Takhar province. Some boys work up to 19-hour days. Children’s activities include extracting salt stones from underground tunnels as deep as 55 meters (180 feet), loading the stones onto donkeys, and carrying the stones distances over 1 mile. Child laborers are unable to attend school, work long days, and reportedly suffer from muscular and respiratory ailments.
Dari and Pashto Translation

Child Labor
Angola Diamonds Forced Labor, Child Labor
Argentina Garlic Child Labor
Argentina Tomatoes Child Labor
Argentina Tobacco Child Labor
Argentina Garments

There are reports that children from Bolivia are forced to produce garments in informal workshops in the city of Buenos Aires and its surrounding municipalities. According to media outlets, NGOs, and government officials, some children from Bolivia are victims of deceptive recruitment and trafficking with false promises of decent working conditions and fair wages. Once in Argentina, these children have restricted freedom of movement, their identity documents are confiscated, they live and work within locked factories, and they are too fearful to leave due to threats of imprisonment. Some end up in conditions of bonded labor, in debt for fees that were charged for transport to Argentina, and are prohibited from leaving their workplaces for years until the debt is paid through wage deductions. These children suffer physical and verbal abuse from their employers, and are only given one meal per day. Some children are forced to work excessive hours, up to 20 hours per day.
Spanish translation

Forced Labor, Child Labor
Argentina Blueberries Child Labor
Argentina Grapes Child Labor
Argentina Strawberries Child Labor
Argentina Bricks Child Labor
Argentina Olives Child Labor
Argentina Cotton Child Labor
Argentina Yerba Mate (Stimulant Plant) Child Labor
Azerbaijan Cotton Child Labor
Bangladesh Soap Child Labor
Bangladesh Glass Child Labor
Bangladesh Furniture (Steel) Child Labor
Bangladesh Bidis (Hand-Rolled Cigarettes) Child Labor
Bangladesh Leather Child Labor
Bangladesh Garments Child Labor
Bangladesh Shrimp Child Labor
Bangladesh Textiles (Jute) Child Labor
Bangladesh Salt Child Labor
Bangladesh Dried Fish

There are reports that children, mostly boys between the ages of 5-17, are forced to work in the production of dried fish in Bangladesh. According to the most recently available government data, close to 1,900 children, or about 24 percent of children working in the dried fish industry, are working under conditions of force. This forced child labor is found in the coastal districts of Borguna, Patuakhali, Chittagong, and Cox's Bazar of the Bay of Bengal, with the highest proportion of children in forced labor working in Bagherhat. According to the Government's data, some of the children work as bonded labor, often in exchange for advanced payments that have been made to their parents. These children are not free to leave the workplace, and some are not allowed any contact with their family. Some children are also forced to work under threat of physical violence and wage deductions.
Bengali translation

Forced Labor, Child Labor
Bangladesh Textiles Child Labor
Bangladesh Footwear Child Labor
Bangladesh Bricks Child Labor
Bangladesh Poultry Child Labor
Bangladesh Matches Child Labor
Belize Citrus Fruits Child Labor
Belize Bananas Child Labor
Belize Sugarcane Child Labor
Benin Cotton

There are reports that children ages 6-17 are forced to produce cotton in Benin. Cotton is grown primarily in the north, such as in Banikoara, and according to NGOs and international organizations, many of the children are trafficked or migrate to this area from other parts of the country, or from Burkina Faso or Togo. Some children are lured by traffickers with false promises about working conditions or terms. Some children work on year-long contracts and are not allowed to leave until the end of the year. They are paid only at the end of the contract, once the cotton is sold, but most children report that they do not receive their full payment, and some are not paid at all. Children usually live with their employer, and do not receive sufficient food.
French translation

Forced Labor, Child Labor
Benin Granite (Crushed) Child Labor
Bolivia Tin Child Labor
Bolivia Zinc Child Labor
Bolivia Cattle Forced Labor
Bolivia Gold Child Labor
Bolivia Brazil Nuts/Chestnuts

There are reports that children are forced to harvest Brazil nuts in Bolivia. Forced child labor in the production of Brazil nuts is known to be found in the Amazon region in particular, and migrant workers are particularly vulnerable. According to international organizations, NGOs, and the U.S. Department of State, many children are forced to work, often with their families, under conditions of bonded labor. Often entire families, including children, are given an advance payment to work in the harvest, and then incur more debt during the harvest. The families are prohibited from leaving, even once the harvest is complete, until their debts are paid off. Sometimes identity papers and wages are withheld as a means to restrict freedom of movement.
Spanish translation

Forced Labor, Child Labor
Bolivia Corn Forced Labor, Child Labor
Bolivia Silver Child Labor
Bolivia Bricks Child Labor
Bolivia Sugarcane

There are reports that children are forced to produce sugarcane in Bolivia. Based on the most recently available data from the ILO, it is estimated that almost a quarter of the migrants working in the sugarcane harvest are children under age 14, of which many are working in conditions of forced labor Many children work with their families under conditions of bonded labor. Entire families, including children, live in accommodations provided by the employer; this dependence on the employer increases their vulnerability to forced labor. The families receive little payment if any, and lodging and food expenses are deducted from their paychecks. Some children inherit the debt of their parents if their parents pass away or stop working, and remain bonded and able to be sold to a different employer.
Spanish translation

Forced Labor, Child Labor
Bolivia Peanuts Forced Labor
Brazil Bananas

There is evidence that children ages 5 to 13 cultivate bananas in Brazil. The Government of Brazil’s 2015 National Household Survey considers all work performed by children below age 14 to be child labor. Based on an analysis of the survey, an estimated 2,936 child laborers cultivate bananas. The ILO has found that generally children who work in agriculture may be at risk of exposure to hazards including, working long hours, carrying heavy loads, using dangerous tools, and exposure to the elements, physical injuries, and chemicals, such as pesticides. The release of this survey demonstrates the Government of Brazil’s commitment to addressing child labor and its acknowledgement that data collection is vital to the design and implementation of sound policies and programs.
Portuguese Translation

Child Labor
Brazil Cotton Child Labor
Brazil Ceramics Child Labor
Brazil Charcoal Forced Labor, Child Labor
Brazil Cattle Forced Labor, Child Labor
Brazil Rice Child Labor
Brazil Beef Child Labor
Brazil Tobacco Child Labor
Brazil Pineapples Child Labor
Brazil Cocoa

There is evidence that children ages 5 to 13 cultivate cocoa in Brazil. In the North of Brazil, children work with family members to cultivate cocoa. The ILO has found that generally children who work in agriculture may be at risk of exposure to hazards including, working long hours, carrying heavy loads, using dangerous tools, and exposure to the elements, physical injuries, and chemicals, such as pesticides. The Government of Brazil’s 2015 National Household Survey considers all work performed by children below age 14 to be child labor. Based on an analysis of the survey, an estimated 2,597 child laborers cultivate cocoa. The release of this survey demonstrates the Government of Brazil’s commitment to addressing child labor and its acknowledgement that data collection is vital to the design and implementation of sound policies and programs.
Portuguese Translation

Child Labor
Brazil Fish

There is evidence that children ages 5 to 13 engage in fishing in Brazil. The ILO has found that generally children who fish may be at risk of exposure to hazards, including long hours, extreme temperatures and harsh weather conditions. The Government of Brazil’s 2015 National Household Survey considers all work performed by children below age 14 to be child labor. Based on an analysis of the survey, an estimated 12,325 child laborers are involved in fishing. The release of this survey demonstrates the Government of Brazil’s commitment to addressing child labor and its acknowledgement that data collection is vital to the design and implementation of sound policies and programs.
Portuguese Translation

Child Labor
Brazil Garments Forced Labor
Brazil Coffee

There is evidence that children ages 10 to 13 cultivate coffee in Brazil. In the states of São Paulo and Minas Gerais, parents often bring their children to work on coffee plantations to support the family income. The Government of Brazil’s 2015 National Household Surveys considers all work performed by children below age 14 to be child labor. Based on an analysis of the survey an estimated 4,993 child laborers cultivate coffee. Individuals, including children, who work in coffee production often do so without contracts and protective equipment, and some of the children and adolescents drop out of school. The release of this survey demonstrates the Government of Brazil’s commitment to addressing child labor and its acknowledgement that data collection is vital to the design and implementation of sound policies and programs.
Portuguese Translation

Child Labor
Brazil Sheep

There is evidence that children ages 5 to 13 raise sheep in Brazil. The ILO has found that generally children who care for farm animals may be at risk of exposure to potential health consequences, including injuries from kicks and infections from animal bites and exposure to harmful bacteria. The Government of Brazil’s 2015 National Household Survey considers all work performed by children below age 14 to be child labor. Based on an analysis of the survey, an estimated 5,773 child laborers raise sheep. The release of this survey demonstrates the Government of Brazil’s commitment to addressing child labor and its acknowledgement that data collection is vital to the design and implementation of sound policies and programs.
Portuguese Translation

Child Labor
Brazil Manioc/Cassava Child Labor
Brazil Timber Forced Labor
Brazil Corn

There is evidence that children ages 5 to 13 cultivate corn in Brazil. The ILO has found that generally children who work in agriculture may be at risk of exposure to hazards including, working long hours, carrying heavy loads, using dangerous tools, and exposure to the elements, physical injuries, and chemicals, such as pesticides. The Government of Brazil’s 2015 National Household Survey considers all work performed by children below age 14 to be child labor. Based on an analysis of the survey, an estimated 17,049 child laborers cultivate corn. The release of this survey demonstrates the Government of Brazil’s commitment to addressing child labor and its acknowledgement that data collection is vital to the design and implementation of sound policies and programs.
Portuguese Translation

Child Labor
Brazil Footwear Child Labor
Brazil Sugarcane

There is evidence that children ages 14 to 17 cultivate sugarcane in Brazil. Brazilian law prohibits all children under age 18 from producing sugarcane. Based on an analysis of the Government of Brazil’s 2015 National Household Survey, an estimated 5,503 child laborers cultivate sugarcane. Individuals, including children, who work in sugarcane production are exposed to long hours and high temperatures, and lack protective equipment. The release of this survey demonstrates the Government of Brazil’s commitment to addressing child labor and its acknowledgement that data collection is vital to the design and implementation of sound policies and programs.
Portuguese Translation

Child Labor
Brazil Sisal Child Labor
Brazil Bricks Child Labor
Brazil Poultry

There is evidence that children ages 5 to 13 raise poultry in Brazil. The ILO has found that generally children who care for farm animals may be at risk of exposure to potential health consequences, including infections from animal bites and exposure to harmful bacteria. The Government of Brazil’s 2015 National Household Survey considers all work performed by children below age 14 to be child labor. Based on an analysis of the survey, an estimated 65,775 child laborers raise poultry. The release of this survey demonstrates the Government of Brazil’s commitment to addressing child labor and its acknowledgement that data collection is vital to the design and implementation of sound policies and programs.
Portuguese Translation

Child Labor
Brazil Sugarcane Forced Labor
Brazil Cashews Child Labor
Brazil Hogs

There is evidence that children ages 5 to 13 raise hogs in Brazil. The ILO has found that generally children who care for farm animals may be at risk of exposure to potential health consequences, including injuries from kicks and infections from animal bites and exposure to harmful bacteria. The Government of Brazil’s 2015 National Household Survey considers all work performed by children below age 14 to be child labor. Based on an analysis of the survey, an estimated 5,896 child laborers raise hogs. The release of this survey demonstrates the Government of Brazil’s commitment to addressing child labor and its acknowledgement that data collection is vital to the design and implementation of sound policies and programs.
Portuguese Translation

Child Labor
Burkina Faso Cotton

There are reports of children ages 10-17 producing cotton under conditions of forced labor in Burkina Faso. According to an NGO report containing the most recently available data on the eastern region of the country, it is estimated that as many as 50 percent of all boys aged 10 and above migrate or are trafficked to work for a year; most work on cotton farms in Tapoa or Kompienga. Children are also trafficked from around the country to work on cotton farms in Houet and Tuy provinces. Some children are forced to sow, weed, and harvest the cotton in hazardous conditions; some work under threats of abuse or withholding of payment. They usually live with their employer, and do not receive sufficient food. These children are lured by recruiters or traffickers with false promises of payment or gifts such as a bicycle. The children work on 12 or 17 month contracts and are prohibited from leaving to return home until the end of the contract. They are paid only when the cotton is sold and they have completed their contract, but most report that they do not receive their full payment, and some receive no payment at all.
French translation

Forced Labor, Child Labor
Burkina Faso Granite

There are reports that children ages 5 to 17 work in granite quarries in Burkina Faso. These children are primarily found in granite quarries located in Pissy and Yagma, on the outskirts of the capital, Ouagadougou. According to Government of Burkina Faso officials, NGOs, and the U.S. Department of State, numerous incidents of child labor have been reported in these granite quarries, including hundreds of children working in the Pissy quarry, and NGOs report that the problem is increasing. Children work for long hours breaking large rocks by hand and carrying heavy loads of dirt, rock, and gravel. Children in granite quarries are at high risk of physical injury, and are exposed to large quantities of dust and smoke, which can cause respiratory diseases. Some children also experience physical abuse in the quarries.
French translation

Child Labor
Burkina Faso Gold

There are reports that children are forced to mine gold in the Sahel region of Burkina Faso. According to a report by the ILO containing the most recently available data, in the combined Sahel regions of Burkina Faso and Niger, up to 30-50 percent of the gold mine workforce is comprised of children; most are under the age of 15, and some work under conditions of forced labor. Some children from around the country are trafficked to mines in the country's Ioba, Oudalan, Passore, and Sissili provinces. These children work in small informal mines that are located in remote rural areas and mostly operate on a seasonal basis. The children, beginning between ages 12 and 14, are forced to work in hazardous conditions digging, breaking rocks, transporting, washing, and pounding the gold, including work underground in narrow shafts. These children receive little or no payment, with many receiving wage deductions for lodging and food expenses.
French translation

Forced Labor, Child Labor
Burma Sesame Forced Labor
Burma Beans (Green, Soy, Yellow)

There are reports that children ages 15-17 work under conditions of forced labor in the production of beans in Burma. An NGO study documents children, as well as adults, forced by the military to work on rotation year round, planting and harvesting beans for the military camp. Local officials and the military enforce these work orders; the children cannot refuse to work, even if sick.
Burmese translation

Forced Labor, Child Labor
Burma Rice

There are reports that children as young as age nine are forced to work in the production of rice in Burma. According to NGOs, villagers, including children, are forced to work planting and harvesting rice for the military camps. These children are forced to work on rotation year-round for the military, although most rice paddy cultivation occurs during the rainy season. Local officials and the military enforce the work orders, and workers cannot refuse to work, even if sick. The forced child laborers are not paid for their work, and the children are beaten if their work is considered to be of unacceptable quality.
Burmese translation

Forced Labor, Child Labor
Burma Physic Nuts/Castor Beans Forced Labor
Burma Jade Forced Labor, Child Labor
Burma Shrimp Forced Labor
Burma Rubies Forced Labor, Child Labor
Burma Teak

There are reports that children are forced to work in the production of teak in Burma. Forced child labor is found on teak plantations in the Thaton District, and particularly in areas near military camps. An NGO study reports that villagers, including children, from multiple villages are regularly mobilized by the military for forced labor to cultivate teak and other crops. The forced laborers are not paid for their work.
Burmese translation

Forced Labor, Child Labor
Burma Bamboo

There are reports that children as young as age 10 are forced to work in the production of bamboo in Burma. According to the ILO and NGOs, forced child labor is pervasive, particularly in Karen, Shan, and Arakan States near military camps, with children constituting up to 40 percent of forced laborers being used for a variety of activities, including the production of bamboo. Some of these children are sent by their families to fulfill a mandate imposed by the military that requires each household in a village to undertake specified forced labor activities. Villagers, including children, are forced by local officials and the military to work cutting bamboo for the military camps. The forced child laborers are not paid for their work, and face physical violence or other punishment if they refuse to work.
Burmese Translation

Forced Labor, Child Labor
Burma Rubber

There are reports that children as young as age nine are forced to work in the production of rubber in Burma. According to reports by NGOs, villagers, including children, are forced to work cultivating rubber plants in nurseries and on plantations for the military camps. Local officials and the military enforce the work orders. The forced child laborers are not paid for their work, and endure physical violence or other punishment if they refuse to work.
Burmese translation

Forced Labor, Child Labor
Burma Garments

There are reports that children ages 12 to 17, mainly girls, produce garments in Burma. According to international organizations and NGOs, child labor in the garment industry is concentrated in Yangon State. For example, research has found at least eight garment factories in Yangon State with incidents of child labor, and reports indicate that child labor remains present in the industry. Though the government has placed legal restrictions on working hours and types of work for children under age 18, there are reports that children work the same hours as adults with higher risks of abuse. There are reports of supervisors or shift leaders physically punishing children if they make mistakes in their work. Some children carry heavy bags and boxes and work long hours, sometimes up to 15-16 hours per day or 60 hours per week, and late into the night. Factories are often poorly ventilated, with temperatures, at times, rising above 100 degrees Fahrenheit.

Child Labor
Burma Bricks

There are reports that children are forced by the military to work in the production of bricks in Burma. According to NGOs, forced child labor in brick production is pervasive, particularly in Northern Rakhine State and near military camps. In some cases, children are recruited into the military and forced to live in barracks and work for years in brick production; in other cases, children are sent by their families on rotation to fulfill the military's forced labor mandate for their household. The children are not paid for their work, and they face physical abuse and other punishments for refusing to work or for producing work that is considered of unacceptable quality.
Burmese translation

Forced Labor, Child Labor
Burma Palm Thatch Forced Labor
Burma Sunflowers Forced Labor
Burma Sugarcane

There are reports that children are forced to work in the production of sugarcane in Burma. Forced child labor is found in the Thaton District, and particularly in areas near military camps. An NGO study documents villagers, including children, mobilized by the dozens each day from multiple villages to work during labor intensive times of the sugarcane production. The children are forced to cut trees and dig out the stumps to prepare the fields, plant the sugarcane, then mill and boil the sugarcane after it is harvested. They are not paid for their work.
Burmese translation

Forced Labor, Child Labor
Cambodia Sugarcane

There are reports that children ages 5 to 17 produce sugarcane in Cambodia. Child labor in the sugarcane sector occurs on both commercial plantations and smallholder farms. Children from families that have lost land through concessions to sugar companies are particularly vulnerable to exploitative labor on plantations. According to international organizations, NGOs, and media reports, child labor in the Cambodian sugarcane sector is a widespread concern, with numerous incidents reported across the country, including reports of hundreds of children cutting cane on plantations in the Koh Kong province. Children laboring in the sugarcane fields often work long hours under the hot sun and report difficulty breathing, headaches, and dizziness as a result. Child workers in this sector perform hazardous tasks such as carrying heavy bundles of sugarcane, using dangerous tools, and spraying toxic pesticides. Many children incur injuries on the job, including skin infections and cuts from sharp cane leaves or knives.
Khmer translation

Child Labor
Cambodia Meat Child Labor
Cambodia Alcoholic Beverages Child Labor
Cambodia Rubber Child Labor
Cambodia Tobacco Child Labor
Cambodia Shrimp Child Labor
Cambodia Salt Child Labor
Cambodia Textiles Child Labor
Cambodia Manioc/Cassava Child Labor
Cambodia Fish Child Labor
Cambodia Timber Child Labor
Cambodia Bricks Child Labor
Cameroon Cocoa Child Labor
Central African Republic Diamonds Child Labor
Chad Cattle Child Labor
China Bricks

There are reports that children, ages 8-17, are forced to produce bricks in China, with concentrations in the Shanxi and Henan provinces. Victims are from provinces across China; some children are abducted or trafficked through coercion and sold to work in brick kilns. Information from media sources and a research study indicate that the children are forced to work without pay under threat of physical violence, held against their will, watched by guards, and denied sufficient food.
Chinese translation

Forced Labor, Child Labor
China Cotton

There are reports that children are forced to pick cotton in China. Reports from an NGO and the U.S. Government indicate that children in the Xinjiang Uighur Autonomous Region and in Gansu province are mobilized through schools and required by provincial regulations to work during the autumn harvest. According to the most recently available estimates, between 40,000 and 1 million students are mobilized annually for the harvest, beginning as early as the third grade. Most children are paid little if at all, after deductions for meals, transportation, and payments to the school. These students are required to pick daily quotas of cotton or pay fines, and performance in the cotton harvest is assessed for the students' promotion to higher grade levels.
Chinese translation

Forced Labor, Child Labor
China Artificial Flowers Forced Labor
China Textiles Child Labor
China Christmas Decorations Forced Labor
China Fireworks Forced Labor, Child Labor
China Nails Forced Labor
China Garments Forced Labor
China Coal Forced Labor
China Toys

There are reports that children, mostly ages 13-16, are forced to produce toys in China. The most recently available data from an NGO study indicates that hundreds of children are exploited in this manner. Reports indicate children from Sichuan, Guangxi, and other provinces are sent to work primarily in Guangdong to make toys. Some of these children are trafficked after being recruited through deceptive promises, and others are forced to work by teachers through work-study programs. Children of the Yi ethnic minority in Liangshan prefecture of Sichuan are particularly vulnerable. The children report being forced to work long hours under threat of financial penalty and being fined for any mistakes in their work. Some children state that teachers withhold wages for “tuition” and management fees. In addition, employers withhold wages for months to prevent children from leaving.
Chinese translation

Forced Labor, Child Labor
China Electronics

There are reports that children ages 13-15 are forced to produce electronics in China. Based on the most recently available data from media sources, government raids, and NGOs, hundreds of cases of forced child labor have been reported in factories in Guangdong province, but the children are often from Henan, Shanxi, or Sichuan provinces. In some cases, children are forced to work in electronics factories through arrangements between the factories and the schools that the children attend in order to cover alleged tuition debts. The forced labor programs are described as student apprenticeships; however, the children report that they were forced to remain on the job and not allowed to return home. Half of the students' wages are sent directly to the schools, and the children receive little compensation after deductions are made for food and accommodations. In other cases, children are abducted or deceived by recruiters, sent to Guangdong, and sold to employers. Some children are held captive, forced to work long hours for little pay.
Chinese translation

Forced Labor, Child Labor
China Footwear Forced Labor
Colombia Bricks (Clay) Child Labor
Colombia Sugarcane Child Labor
Colombia Coca (Stimulant Plant)

There are reports that children in Colombia as young as 11 years old are forced to cultivate and pick coca, and to scrape coca leaves. The Government, NGOs, media, and the ILO indicate that some children are forcibly recruited by non-state armed groups, such as the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia, the National Liberation Army, and criminal groups to pick coca. Others are forced by drug traffickers. Criminal and illegal armed groups use threats of torture or death to prevent children from attempting to escape.
Spanish translation

Forced Labor, Child Labor
Colombia Emeralds Child Labor
Colombia Pornography Child Labor
Colombia Coffee Child Labor
Colombia Gold Child Labor
Colombia Coal Child Labor
Congo, Democratic Republic of the (DRC) Tin Ore (Cassiterite)

There are reports that children ages 5-17 are forced to work in the production of cassiterite, or tin ore, in some mines in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Reports from NGOs and the U.S. Department of State indicate that many children have been identified working in conditions of forced labor in the mines in Eastern Congo, particularly in North and South Kivu. Some children are forced to work at the mines with their families in situations of bonded labor, while other children are sent away to the mines by their parents to pay off the family's debt. These children are paid little, if at all. In addition, many mines are controlled by military officers or armed groups, which are known to round up villagers, including children, at gunpoint and force them to work with threats of violence. These forcibly-recruited children do not have freedom of movement and do not receive payment for their work.
French translation

Forced Labor, Child Labor
Congo, Democratic Republic of the (DRC) Diamonds Child Labor
Congo, Democratic Republic of the (DRC) Cobalt Ore (Heterogenite) Child Labor
Congo, Democratic Republic of the (DRC) Tantalum Ore (Coltan)

There are reports that children ages 5-17 are forced to work in the production of coltan, or tantalum ore, in some mines in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Reports from the U.S. Department of State and NGOs state that many children have been identified working in conditions of forced labor in the mines in Eastern Congo, particularly in North and South Kivu. Some children are forced to work at the mines with their families in situations of bonded labor, while other children are sent away to the mines by their parents to pay off the family's debt. These children are paid little, if at all. In addition, many mines are controlled by military officers or armed groups, which are known to round up villagers, including children, at gunpoint and force them to work with threats of violence. These forcibly-recruited children do not have freedom of movement and do not receive payment for their work.
French translation

Forced Labor, Child Labor
Congo, Democratic Republic of the (DRC) Gold

There are reports that children ages 10-16 are forced to work in the production of gold in some mines in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Based on the most recently available NGO evidence, thousands of children are working in conditions of forced labor in the mines in Eastern Congo, particularly in North and South Kivu. Some children are forced to work at the mines with their families in situations of bonded labor, while other children are sent away to the mines by their parents to pay off the family's debt. Child miners are paid little if at all. Many mines are controlled by military officers or armed groups which force children to work. Some children are abducted to work in the mines.
French translation

Forced Labor, Child Labor
Congo, Democratic Republic of the (DRC) Copper Child Labor
Congo, Democratic Republic of the (DRC) Tungsten Ore (Wolframite)

There are reports that children ages 5-17 are forced to work in the production of wolframite, or tungsten ore, in some mines in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Based on estimates from NGOs and the U.S. Department of State, hundreds of children are working in conditions of forced labor in the mines in Eastern Congo, particularly in North and South Kivu. Some children are forced to work at the mines with their families in situations of bonded labor, while other children are sent away to the mines by their parents to pay off the family's debt. These children are paid little, if at all. In addition, many mines are controlled by military officers or armed groups, which are known to round up villagers, including children, at gunpoint and force them to work with threats of violence. These forcibly-recruited children do not have freedom of movement and do not receive payment for their work.
French translation

Forced Labor, Child Labor
Costa Rica Cattle Child Labor
Costa Rica Coffee

There are reports that children ages 5 to 17 cultivate coffee in Costa Rica. Based on an analysis by international organizations of the Government of Costa Rica’s National Household Survey (ENAHO) 2011, published in 2015, 8.8 percent of child laborers in the country, or approximately 1,422 children ages 5-14, were in child labor in coffee production in Costa Rica. The ENAHO 2011 counts as child labor all work performed by a child below age 15. In addition, the analysis indicates that 5.2 percent of working adolescents ages 15 to 17, or 1,625 adolescents, were also engaged in coffee production. The analysis noted that 78 percent of children and adolescents in child labor in Costa Rica work with their families. Although more recent national surveys have shown a 65 percent decrease in the number of children ages 12 to 17 working in agriculture from 13,866 in 2011 to 4,853 in 2015, these surveys do not provide the number of children in child labor in the coffee sector. Data from the 2016 ENAHO, which included a child labor module, is expected to be released in early 2017.
Spanish translation

Child Labor
Cote d'Ivoire Coffee

There are reports that children ages 14-17 and younger in Côte d'Ivoire are forced to work on coffee plantations. Based on a research study, thousands of children are involved in this type of labor. Some children are forcibly recruited, or recruited through deceptive means, and transported to coffee plantations in Côte d'Ivoire from nearby countries including Benin, Mali, Togo, and Burkina Faso. These children are sold to traffickers. Other children leave their home countries or communities voluntarily, but end up in situations where they are not paid and have no means to return home. Some children are forced to work for three or four years before receiving payment or returning home. Others are forced to work, even if sick, and prevented from leaving the plantations through threat of physical violence, withheld payments, or denial of food.
French Translation

Forced Labor, Child Labor
Cote d'Ivoire Cocoa

There are reports that children from within Côte d'Ivoire, as well as migrant children from Benin, Burkina Faso, Guinea, Mali, Nigeria, and Togo, are working under conditions of forced labor on Ivoirian cocoa farms. Based on the most recently available estimate from Tulane University, over 4,000 children work in conditions of forced labor in the production of cocoa in Côte d'Ivoire. Some children are sold by their parents to traffickers, some are kidnapped, and others migrate willingly but fall victim to traffickers who sell them to recruiters or farmers, where they end up in conditions of bonded labor. Some farmers buy the children and refuse to let them leave the farm until the debt of their purchase has been worked off. The children are frequently not paid for their work; some of their wages are paid to the recruiter or trafficker. These children are held against their will on isolated farms, are locked in their living quarters at night, and are threatened and beaten if they attempt to escape. They are punished by their employers with physical abuse. They are forced to work long hours, including overtime, and are required to work even when they are sick. Some children are denied sufficient food by their traffickers and employers. Some children are forced to perform dangerous tasks, including carrying heavy loads, using machetes and sharp tools, and applying pesticides and fertilizers.
French translation

Forced Labor, Child Labor
Dominican Republic Sugarcane Forced Labor, Child Labor
Dominican Republic Tomatoes Child Labor
Dominican Republic Rice Child Labor
Dominican Republic Baked Goods Child Labor
Dominican Republic Coffee Child Labor
Ecuador Bricks Child Labor
Ecuador Flowers Child Labor
Ecuador Gold Child Labor
Ecuador Bananas Child Labor
Egypt Cotton Child Labor
Egypt Stones (Limestone) Child Labor
Egypt Bricks

There are reports that children ages 9 to 17 produce bricks in Egypt. The country’s brick factories are located in or near the cities of Cairo, Giza, Helwan, and in Qalyobia governorate. One news article estimated that hundreds of children worked in brickmaking; another estimated that there were more than 10,000. Children work generally 8 to 13 hours per day, according to several news sources. Their work activities are reported to include moving sand and mud into brick-making machines, moving bricks into ovens, and loading baked bricks onto trucks. Brickmaking typically involves exposure to extreme temperatures at different stages of production, due to both the hot sun and working close to ovens set to temperatures reaching nearly 1,000 degrees Celsius. This work is often done without protective gear, helmets, or gloves.
Arabic Translation

Child Labor
El Salvador Sugarcane Child Labor
El Salvador Shellfish Child Labor
El Salvador Baked Goods

There is evidence that children ages 5 to 17 are engaged in the production of baked goods in El Salvador. According to the Government of El Salvador’s Multi-Purpose Household Survey of 2015, a working child is considered to be engaged in hazardous child labor if the child is performing work that is hazardous according to national legislation. The survey estimates that 123,259 children ages 5 to 17 perform hazardous child labor in El Salvador, including using dangerous tools, carrying heavy loads, working with chemicals, working long or night shifts, and being exposed to dust, smoke, or extreme heat or humidity. Approximately 9,737 of these children in hazardous child labor are engaged in the production of baked goods. The release of this survey demonstrates the Government of El Salvador’s commitment to addressing child labor and its acknowledgement that data collection is vital to the design and implementation of sound policies and programs.
Spanish Translation

Child Labor
El Salvador Fireworks Child Labor
El Salvador Coffee Child Labor
El Salvador Cereal Grains

There is evidence that children ages 5 to 17 are engaged in the production of cereal grains in El Salvador. According to the Government of El Salvador’s Multi-Purpose Household Survey of 2015, a working child is considered to be engaged in hazardous child labor if the child is performing work that is hazardous according to national legislation. The survey estimates that 123,259 children ages 5 to 17 perform hazardous child labor in El Salvador, including using dangerous tools, carrying heavy loads, working with chemicals, working long or night shifts, and being exposed to dust, smoke, or extreme heat or humidity. Approximately 40,675 of these children in hazardous child labor are engaged in the production of cereal grains. The release of this survey demonstrates the Government of El Salvador’s commitment to addressing child labor and its acknowledgement that data collection is vital to the design and implementation of sound policies and programs.
Spanish Translation

Child Labor
El Salvador Cattle

There is evidence that children ages 5 to 17 are engaged in cattle raising in El Salvador. According to the Government of El Salvador’s Multi-Purpose Household Survey of 2015, a working child is considered to be engaged in hazardous child labor if the child is performing work that is hazardous according to national legislation. The survey estimates that 123,259 children ages 5 to 17 perform hazardous child labor in El Salvador, including using dangerous tools, carrying heavy loads, working with chemicals, working long or night shifts, and being exposed to dust, smoke, or extreme heat or humidity. Approximately 3,698 of these children in hazardous child labor are engaged in cattle raising. The release of this survey demonstrates the Government of El Salvador’s commitment to addressing child labor and its acknowledgement that data collection is vital to the design and implementation of sound policies and programs.
Spanish Translation

Child Labor
Eswatini Bovines

There is evidence that children ages 8 to 17 raise bovines in Eswatini. Child labor in this sector is concentrated in the rural areas of Hhohho, Lubombo, Manzini, and Shiselweni. In 2018, the Government of Eswatini and the International Labor Organization published results from the 2014 Survey on Child Labor in Herding in Rural Areas in Eswatini. According to international standards on the minimum age for work, children working below the age of 15 are engaged in child labor. The survey estimates that 72,332 children below the age of 15 raise bovines. Children perform physically arduous tasks while herding in the grasslands and mountainous regions, and risk occupational injury and disease from exposure to dangerous tools, insecticides and herbicides. Children’s injuries include fractures, dislocations and sprains, burns, frostbite, breathing problems, skin problems, extreme fatigue, and snake bites. The release of this survey demonstrates the Government of Eswatini’s commitment to addressing child labor and its acknowledgement that data collection is vital to the design and implementation of sound policies and programs.

Child Labor
Ethiopia Cattle Child Labor
Ethiopia Textiles (Hand-Woven)

There are reports that children, mostly boys as young as seven years old, produce woven textiles under conditions of forced labor in Ethiopia. These children typically work in Addis Ababa, however many come from the south, including Gamo Gofa and Wolaita zones, some of them as victims of trafficking. The trafficked children are often sold to recruiters, and the parents and children are deceived with false promises about the wages and opportunities for education while working. Some of the children sleep at the worksites, held in captivity and isolation, and are not provided with sufficient food. They are punished with physical abuse. Some children are forced to work long hours and overtime, and receive little, if any, pay.
Amharic translation

Forced Labor, Child Labor
Ethiopia Gold Child Labor
Ghana Cocoa Child Labor
Ghana Fish (Tilapia)

There are reports that children ages 5-17 in Ghana are forced to work in the fishing industry, assisting primarily in the catching of tilapia, but also of such fish as mudfish, silverfish, catfish, latefish, and electric fish. According to the most recently available data from universities, NGOs, government raids, and international organizations, hundreds of children in the Lake Volta region have been rescued from the fishing industry, in which they were forced to undertake such tasks as diving to untangle fishing nets from underwater tree stumps. Children are often trafficked from the Volta, Central, Eastern, or Ashanti regions to Tato and other Lake Volta communities to work. Some of the children forced to work in the fishing industry are working in bonded labor after being sold or sent by their parents under a one- to three-year contract, for which the parents are promised payment on agreed-upon intervals. The children frequently are paid little, if at all, and are forced to work long hours. The children forced to work in the fishing industry often live with their employers, where they face physical violence and are not provided with sufficient food.

Forced Labor, Child Labor
Ghana Gold Child Labor
Ghana Fish

There are reports that children ages 5-17 in Ghana are forced to work in the fishing industry, assisting primarily in the catching of tilapia, but also of such fish as mudfish, silverfish, catfish, latefish, and electric fish. According to the most recently available data from universities, NGOs, government raids, and international organizations, hundreds of children in the Lake Volta region have been rescued from the fishing industry, in which they were forced to undertake such tasks as diving to untangle fishing nets from underwater tree stumps. Children are often trafficked from the Volta, Central, Eastern, or Ashanti regions to Tato and other Lake Volta communities to work. Some of the children forced to work in the fishing industry are working in bonded labor after being sold or sent by their parents under a one- to three-year contract, for which the parents are promised payment on agreed-upon intervals. The children frequently are paid little, if at all, and are forced to work long hours. The children forced to work in the fishing industry often live with their employers, where they face physical violence and are not provided with sufficient food.

Forced Labor, Child Labor
Guatemala Sugarcane Child Labor
Guatemala Fireworks Child Labor
Guatemala Gravel (Crushed Stones) Child Labor
Guatemala Corn Child Labor
Guatemala Coffee Child Labor
Guatemala Broccoli Child Labor
Guinea Cocoa Child Labor
Guinea Diamonds Child Labor
Guinea Coffee Child Labor
Guinea Gold Child Labor
Guinea Cashews Child Labor
Honduras Melons Child Labor
Honduras Lobsters Child Labor
Honduras Coffee Child Labor
India Cottonseed (Hybrid)

There are reports that children, especially girls ages 6-14, are forced to produce hybrid cottonseed in India. Cottonseed production, and cottonseed farms with bonded child laborers, are reported to be concentrated in the state of Andhra Pradesh. According to NGO reports, between 400,000 and 450,000 children are working in the production of hybrid cottonseed, many working as forced or bonded labor. Some of these children are bonded to their employer, forced to work to pay off the debt of advanced payments made to their parents. Some children are forced to work with toxic pesticides.
Hindi Translation

Forced Labor, Child Labor
India Soccer Balls Child Labor
India Incense (Agarbatti) Child Labor
India Glass Bangles Child Labor
India Bricks

There are reports of children working under conditions of forced labor to produce bricks in India's kilns. The most recently available information from a trade union report indicates that in the State of Haryana alone, as many as 40,000 children, many of them forced laborers, are working in brick kilns. Bonded labor in the brick industry is found across India, including in Punjab, Haryana, and Uttar Pradesh. The kilns use a system of bonded labor in which children often work alongside other members of their debt-bonded families. Some of these children are forced to work as a guarantee for loans to their parents. Families take an advance payment from recruiters and then are forced to work to pay off the debt; the debt rolls over from one year to the next, binding the worker in a cycle of debt bondage. Children in scheduled castes, a socially disadvantaged class in India, and of migrant families, are particularly vulnerable to forced labor. Some children are forced to work under threat of physical violence. Some children and their families are not paid regularly, do not receive the promised wages, and are prohibited from leaving the worksite.
Hindi translation

Forced Labor, Child Labor
India Stones

There are reports that children in India are forced to quarry stones. These children work in stone quarries, mines, and crushers under conditions of bonded labor. According to an assessment by the ILO, as many as 500,000 stone quarry workers, including entire families, in Tamil Nadu were bonded laborers. Families receive an advance payment and become bonded for generations to pay off the debt. Some children are used as a guarantee for the loan and are forced to work to pay it off. Some children inherit the debt of their parents and may be bought and sold between contractors. Children of scheduled castes, a socially disadvantaged class in India, and migrant children, are particularly vulnerable. The children live at the worksite and face isolation and restrictions on their movement. Some children are forced to work under threat of financial penalties or physical violence, receive little pay, and are denied wages.
Hindi translation

Forced Labor, Child Labor
India Bidis (Hand-Rolled Cigarettes) Child Labor
India Rice

There are reports of children working under conditions of forced labor in rice mills in India, particularly in Tamil Nadu. These children are forced to work producing rice through a system of bonded labor, often working with their families. Children of the lower castes, socially disadvantaged classes in India, are particularly vulnerable. According to an ILO study, over 1,000 families work in bonded labor in rice mills in one district of Tamil Nadu. Families take an advance payment from recruiters and then are forced to work to pay off the debt. Some children face harassment and restrictions on their movement from mill personnel.
Hindi translation

Forced Labor, Child Labor
India Cotton Child Labor
India Sugarcane Child Labor
India Brassware Child Labor
India Carpets Forced Labor, Child Labor
India Leather Goods/Accessories Child Labor
India Garments

There are reports that children, most between the ages of 8-17, are forced to produce garments in India. Based on the most recently available data from NGOs, up to 100,000 children throughout the country are being forced to produce garments. Recent reports suggest that forced child labor has shifted from factories to home-based production and from urban to suburban areas, particularly in southern India. Dalit and scheduled caste children, a socially disadvantaged class in India, are particularly vulnerable to forced labor in this industry. Many children are trafficked into garment production, recruited under deceptive terms, moved between employers without consent, and paid little or nothing for their work. Some children, as young as age five, are recruited for work through an advance payment to their parents, creating a situation of debt bondage which the child must work to repay. The children are isolated, often live at the worksite, and face restricted freedom of movement. Some children are exposed to dye and toxic chemicals without protective equipment; and some are forced to work overtime, even when they are sick. Some children are punished and threatened with verbal and physical abuse, financial penalty, and some are routinely deprived of food, water, and sleep. The children are forced to perform tasks including stitching, dyeing, cutting, sewing buttons, and embellishing garments.
Hindi translation

Forced Labor, Child Labor
India Locks Child Labor
India Fireworks Child Labor
India Thread/Yarn Child Labor
India Silk Fabric Child Labor
India Mica

There are reports that children ages 5 to 17 are engaged in collecting mica from abandoned mines, primarily in illegal mining operations in India. Children are primarily found mining in the major mica-producing states of Bihar, Jharkhand, and Rajasthan, often in lieu of attending school. NGOs and media sources have documented hundreds of children working in mica across these states. Children’s tasks reportedly include breaking apart rocks to mine the minerals, carrying loads of rocks, and sorting and separating mica from other mined minerals. According to media reports and interviews, children’s inhalation of mica dust has contributed to respiratory health issues. Children also reportedly experience other health and safety hazards, resulting in injuries such as scorpion bites and broken bones, or in some cases, even death in poorly-maintained and unregulated mineshafts.
Hindi Translation

Child Labor
India Silk Thread Child Labor
India Embellished Textiles

There are reports of children, many between the ages of 8-14, producing embellished textiles under conditions of forced labor in India. Some children work under a system of debt bondage. Most factories that produce zari, a type of embroidery, are concentrated in Mumbai and Delhi, but many children are trafficked from other locations such as Bihar. According to government raids and an NGO report, between 125,000 and 210,000 children are working in Delhi embroidery workshops, and approximately 100,000 are working in zari embroidery and other textile embellishment workshops in Mumbai and elsewhere. Some children are forced to work under threat of physical violence. Some work long hours including overtime and do not receive payment for their work.
Hindi Translation

Forced Labor, Child Labor
India Gems Child Labor
India Footwear Child Labor
India Matches Child Labor
Indonesia Tin

There are reports that children ages 5 to 17 work in tin mining in Indonesia. Child labor in this sector is concentrated in the tin-producing islands of Bangka-Belitung province, in ASM. According to a 2014 ILO sectoral survey on child labor in informal tin mining, published in 2015, an estimated 6,300 children are engaged in child labor in tin mining. Children work at dangerous heights and in deep, slippery pits where there are high risks of landslides and injuries. Children’s tasks include operating pressurized-water machinery to separate tin from other materials, digging in the earth to find tin deposits, and panning for tin in bodies of water where children are exposed to extreme weather conditions and are at risk of drowning.
Indonesian translation

Child Labor
Indonesia Footwear (Sandals) Child Labor
Indonesia Rubber Child Labor
Indonesia Tobacco Child Labor
Indonesia Oil (Palm) Child Labor
Indonesia Gold Child Labor
Indonesia Fish

There are reports that adults, predominantly men, are forced to work in the fishing industry in Indonesia. Forced labor often occurs on fishing vessels operating in Indonesian territorial waters, especially around the remote island ports of Benjina and Ambon. The majority of exploited fishermen are Cambodian, Lao, and Burmese nationals. Since March 2015, the International Organization for Migration, in collaboration with the Indonesian Ministry of Marine Affairs and Fisheries, has identified approximately 1,500 new labor trafficking cases in the Indonesian fishing industry, with media sources reporting the rescue of more than 2,000 trafficked fishermen during 2015. Victims report being coerced or tricked in their home countries into working on Thai fishing vessels by brokers who promise jobs in other sectors, and then being held in forced labor for up to 10 years. Often fishermen are locked in cells to prevent their escape. Some men have been forced to fish for 20 to 22 hours a day, with little or no pay, and have been subjected to threats and severe physical abuse while at sea.
Indonesian translation

Forced Labor, Child Labor
Iran Bricks

There are reports that children ages 7 to 17 produce bricks in Iran. Media reports indicate that most brick kiln workers are Afghan migrants whose children work alongside them in the summer months. There are reports of child labor in the production of bricks in various parts of the country, including Tehran, Shahr-e Rey, and Gorgan. For example, available data indicates that there are 25,000 workers in brick kilns in Tehran Province, and news articles report that in one town in Tehran Province, the majority of the brick kiln workforce consists of school-aged children who do not attend school. According to Iranian news outlets, children in the brick kilns work more than 8 hours a day and are exposed to injuries, dust, and extreme heat.
Persian translation

Child Labor
Iran Carpets Child Labor
Kazakhstan Cotton Forced Labor, Child Labor
Kenya Tea Child Labor
Kenya Miraa (Stimulant Plant) Child Labor
Kenya Rice Child Labor
Kenya Sugarcane Child Labor
Kenya Tobacco Child Labor
Kenya Sand

There are reports that children ages 10 to 17 mine or “harvest” sand in Kenya. These children reportedly work in Busia, Homa Bay, Kilifi, Kitui, Machakos, and Nakuru counties. It is reported that boys are more likely to work in harvesting sand than girls. In a study from Kenyatta University, sand harvesting was the most frequently reported reason for primary school students to drop out in Kathiani Division in Machakos. Among 80 students interviewed, all said they were involved in sand harvesting to some degree. Similarly, a survey of local residents and interviews with community stakeholders in Magarini determined that sand harvesting was a leading form of child labor for boys. In addition, according to the ILO, academics, NGOs, local government officials, and the U.S. Department of State, numerous incidents of child labor have been reported in sand production across the country. In many cases, children drop out of school to dig and shovel sand in and along rivers and load and unload sand onto and from large trucks. Children harvest sand during school hours and at night, and are at risk of accidents from collapsing mine walls that can result in loss of life.
Swahili translation

Child Labor
Kenya Coffee Child Labor
Kenya Sisal Child Labor
Kenya Fish Child Labor
Korea, North Cement Forced Labor
Korea, North Iron Forced Labor
Korea, North Gold Forced Labor
Korea, North Textiles Forced Labor
Korea, North Bricks Forced Labor
Korea, North Coal Forced Labor
Korea, North Timber Forced Labor
Kyrgyz Republic Cotton Child Labor
Kyrgyz Republic Tobacco Child Labor
Lebanon Tobacco Child Labor
Lebanon Potatoes

There are reports that children ages 7 to 17 harvest potatoes in Lebanon. Most children are Syrian refugees who live and work in Lebanon’s Bekaa Valley. Based on information from international humanitarian organizations, thousands of children are engaged in child labor in the cultivation and harvesting of potatoes. Many of these children work long hours carrying heavy loads, are exposed to extreme temperatures, and lack access to potable water and toilet facilities. Some are beaten by their employers if they do not behave as expected or work slower than required. Many of these children do not attend school.
Arabic translation

Child Labor
Lesotho Cattle Child Labor
Liberia Rubber Child Labor
Liberia Diamonds Child Labor
Madagascar Sapphires Child Labor
Madagascar Stones Child Labor
Madagascar Vanilla Child Labor
Malawi Tea Child Labor
Malawi Tobacco

There are reports that children in Malawi are forced to work producing tobacco. Tobacco estates are concentrated in the Mzimba, Kasungu, Mchinji and Mzimba districts. According to the most recently available data from the ILO and NGOs, over 70,000 children work on tobacco plantations, some of them under conditions of bonded labor. Families working on tobacco estates sometimes become bonded to their landlords, and their children are forced to work to repay their family debts. Landlords charge these tenant workers for costs such as rent, fertilizer, and seeds; these costs often exceed the profit earned from the tobacco harvest and result in debt for the worker and his or her family. Some children are also hired under deceptive terms of work and promised payment, and then are paid little, if at all, at the end of the season. Some children are forced to work long hours, including overtime, and are forced to perform dangerous tasks, such as carrying heavy loads and using pesticides. In addition, certain children work under threats and penalties including physical, verbal, and sexual abuse, and do not receive food or pay.

Forced Labor, Child Labor
Malaysia Garments Forced Labor
Malaysia Oil (Palm) Forced Labor, Child Labor
Malaysia Electronics Forced Labor
Mali Rice

There are reports that children are forced to work cultivating rice in Mali, particularly along the Niger River and in the Segou region. According to a university study and the ILO, some children are trafficked in groups of 25 to 50, and an estimated 2,000 children have been forced to work in rice fields in Mali. Some children are known to be recruited from villages in other parts of Mali to cultivate rice in Niono. Boys are also trafficked from Burkina Faso to produce rice in Mali. Some boys ages 10-15 from Burkina Faso and Mali are sent to work in rice fields by their Koranic teachers at religious schools. Organized trafficking rings link the farmers with the teachers and the children. These boys receive no pay for their work; the farmers pay the teachers and the recruiters for the boys' labor.
French translation

Forced Labor, Child Labor
Mali Cotton Child Labor
Mali Gold Child Labor
Mauritania Goats Child Labor
Mauritania Cattle Child Labor
Mexico Cucumbers Child Labor
Mexico Beans (Green Beans) Child Labor
Mexico Melons Child Labor
Mexico Eggplants Child Labor
Mexico Chile Peppers Child Labor
Mexico Tomatoes Child Labor
Mexico Chile Peppers

There are reports that men and women are forced to work in the production of chile peppers in Mexico. According to media reports, NGOs, and the U.S. Department of State, there are hundreds of forced labor victims working to produce chile peppers. Many of these victims report being recruited by middlemen, called enganchadores, that lie to workers about the nature and conditions of the work, wages, hours, and quality of living conditions. Sources report that cases of forced labor in chile peppers production predominantly occurs in small and medium holder farms and have been found in states such as Baja California, Chihuahua, Jalisco, and San Luis Potosi. According to available reports, indigenous farmworkers from impoverished regions of central and southern Mexico are particularly vulnerable to forced labor in the agricultural sector due to low education levels, linguistic barriers, and discrimination. Once on the farms, some men and women work up to 15 hours per day under the threat of dismissal and receive subminimum wage payments or no payment at all. There are reports of some workers being threatened with physical violence or physically abused for leaving their jobs. Workers also report finding themselves in overcrowded and unsanitary housing facilities with no access to potable water, latrines, electricity, and medical care. Some workers face growing indebtedness to company stores that often inflate the prices of their goods, forcing workers to purchase provisions on credit and limiting their ability to leave the farms.
Spanish Translation

Forced Labor
Mexico Tomatoes

There are reports that men and women are forced to work in the production of tomatoes in Mexico. According to media reports, NGOs, and the U.S. Department of State, there are hundreds of forced labor victims working to produce tomatoes. Many of these victims report being recruited by middlemen, called enganchadores, that lie to workers about the nature and conditions of the work, wages, hours, and quality of living conditions. Sources report that cases of forced labor occur on both commercial tomato plantations and smallholder farms, and have been found in states such as Baja California, Coahuila, Jalisco, San Luis Potosi, and Sinaloa. According to available reports, indigenous farmworkers from impoverished regions of central and southern Mexico are particularly vulnerable to forced labor in the agricultural sector due to low education levels, linguistic barriers, and discrimination. Once on the farms, some men and women work up to 15 hours per day under the threat of dismissal and receive subminimum wage payments. There are reports of some workers being threatened with physical violence or physically abused for leaving their jobs. Workers also report finding themselves in overcrowded and unsanitary housing facilities with no access to potable water, latrines, electricity, and medical care. Some workers face growing indebtedness to company stores that often inflate the prices of their goods, forcing workers to purchase provisions on credit and limiting their ability to leave the farms.
Spanish Translation

Forced Labor
Mexico Pornography Child Labor
Mexico Sugarcane Child Labor
Mexico Poppies

There are reports that children as young as 7 years old cultivate and harvest poppies in Mexico, especially in impoverished indigenous communities where they work alongside family members. Opium from the poppy plant is a highly addictive narcotic that is used in the production of illegal drugs, such as heroin. According to media reports, NGOs, Government of Mexico reports, and the U.S. Department of State, child labor has been reported in remote areas of Guerrero, including in the mountainous regions of La Montaña and La Sierra where most of the poppy fields are located. Many children miss school to work in the fields during harvest time, often work long hours in hazardous environments, and use sharp tools to extract the opium from the poppy plant.
Spanish Translation

Child Labor
Mexico Tobacco Child Labor
Mexico Onions Child Labor
Mexico Coffee Child Labor
Mongolia Coal Child Labor
Mongolia Fluorspar (Mineral) Child Labor
Mongolia Gold Child Labor
Mozambique Tobacco Child Labor
Namibia Cattle Child Labor
Nepal Embellished Textiles

There are reports that children, mostly boys ages 7-17, are forced to produce embellished textiles in Nepal. The factories are spread across the Kathmandu Valley and are concentrated in Thankot. The child workers are mainly recruited from Sarlahi, Mohattari, and Dhanusha Districts. Based on a research report, close to 7,500 children are working under forced labor conditions in the sector. Factory owners often recruit certain boys to work on one- or two-year contracts, paying an advance to their parents for the boys' labor. The boys are forced to work long hours without pay. At the end of the contract, the factory owner offers another advance payment to the parents, and the boys then return to work for the factory. During the subsequent contract, the children receive little or no wages after the initial advance payment as wages are deducted to repay the advance, and accommodation and food expenses are also deducted. These children live at the worksite, and the factories are often locked, preventing the children from leaving.
Nepali Translation

Forced Labor, Child Labor
Nepal Bricks

There are reports that children ages 6-17 and some younger than age 5 are working under conditions of forced labor to produce bricks in Nepal. According to available information from an NGO report, two-thirds of the children are male. Brick kilns are concentrated in the Kathmandu Valley and Terai, and operate seasonally between October and June. According to the most recently available NGO data, between 30,000 and 60,000 children work in Nepal's brick kilns, of which up to 39 percent are working as bonded labor. Migrant families, members of certain castes – a socially disadvantaged class in Nepal – and ethnic minorities, such as Dalit, Janajati, and Madeshi, are particularly vulnerable to bonded labor in brick kilns. Most of the children are from Nepal, however some are from West Bengal and Uttar Pradesh, India. Many families take advance loans from brick kiln employers or brokers with a commitment to produce a specified quantity of bricks, and become bonded laborers. Their children are bound by their parents' debt and work alongside their families making bricks. The bonded families live at the kiln worksites, without access to safe water or sanitation facilities, and are prohibited from leaving until the debts are paid in full. Some bonded children are forced to work 12 hours a day, and receive little, if any, payment after wage deductions to repay the family debt. Some children are penalized by their employers with verbal or physical abuse.
Nepali translation

Forced Labor, Child Labor
Nepal Stones

There are reports that children as young as age five are forced to quarry stones in Nepal. An NGO report and the media indicate that these children work as bonded laborers, often working alongside their parents and other family members in quarries and riverbeds across the country. Families borrow money and are paid too little to escape their debt, remaining in debt bondage. Some children, usually with their families, live at the worksite where they are watched by guards and forbidden from leaving. The children are often forced to perform hazardous work, including carrying heavy loads. Employers threaten to withhold food from the workers, including children. Some children experience physical violence by their employers.
Nepali translation

Forced Labor, Child Labor
Nepal Carpets

There are reports that children are forced to produce carpets in Nepal. Children age 14 and older are found in registered carpet factories, while children younger than 14 are found in informal, unregistered carpet factories. Carpet factories are concentrated in the Kathmandu Valley. Some children work alone or with their families as bonded laborers in the factories. Most children do not receive payment for their work. Some children work to pay off advance payments for their labor made by the employer to the recruiter or their families. These children live in the factory or nearby in accommodations provided by the employer. The children are not free to leave until the debt has been repaid. Many of the children are forced to work long hours and overtime, up to 18 hours per day; many cannot leave the factory even after they have completed their long workday. Such children are punished by employers for refusing to work, missing production quotas, falling asleep, or making mistakes.
Nepali translation

Forced Labor, Child Labor
Nicaragua Coffee Child Labor
Nicaragua Gold Child Labor
Nicaragua Shellfish Child Labor
Nicaragua Stones (Pumice) Child Labor
Nicaragua Gravel (Crushed Stones) Child Labor
Nicaragua Tobacco Child Labor
Nicaragua Bananas Child Labor
Niger Gold Child Labor
Niger Trona (Minerals) Child Labor
Niger Cattle Forced Labor
Niger Salt Child Labor
Niger Gypsum (Mineral) Child Labor
Nigeria Cocoa

There are reports that children are forced to produce cocoa in Nigeria. The ILO, media pieces, and an academic report indicate that children are trafficked across Nigeria and from Burkina Faso by intermediaries and recruiters to produce cocoa. Children from Cross River and Akwa Ibom states in southeastern Nigeria are particularly vulnerable. Some children are sold by their parents to recruiters. The recruiters are paid for their recruitment of the children; many children receive no pay for their work. Some children are forced to work long hours, including during the hottest hours of the day, leaving them at substantial risk for heat-related illness. The children are forced to perform dangerous tasks, such as using sharp tools, carrying heavy loads, and handling pesticides, without protective equipment.

Forced Labor, Child Labor
Nigeria Gold

There are reports that children as young as age 8 mine gold in Nigeria. This practice is especially common in Zamfara state, which has significant gold deposits. Media outlets report hundreds of children work in artisanal and small-scale gold mining (ASGM) throughout Nigeria, causing them to abandon school. ASGM involves physically demanding work due to the un-mechanized nature and often many occupational safety and health risks. Children use their bare hands and tools to dig for gold in tunnels hundreds of meters below ground, without any protective equipment. Children face additional health risks during the processing stage when they handle mercury, a highly toxic substance, using it to extract gold from ore. Crushing ore to extract gold exposes children to lead-contaminated dust. This exposure can lead to acute lead poisoning and in May 2015 the Government announced the deaths of 28 children from lead poisoning as a result of the illegal mining of gold in Nigeria.

Child Labor
Nigeria Granite

There are reports that children, mostly boys ages 4-17, are forced to quarry granite in Nigeria. Some children are abducted and trafficked from within Nigeria and from Benin to work in granite quarries and mines in the Federal Capital Territory, as well as the states of Ebonyi, Enugu, Ogun, Oyo, and Osun. Reports from the United Nations (UN) and media indicate that between 5,000 and 6,000 children from Benin alone were forced to work in the granite quarries; multiple government rescue operations identified between 50 and 200 children engaged in this work at a time. The children are forced to work up to 16 hours a day, even when they are sick. Many are forced to work under threat of physical violence. Children are often forced to sleep outside and are denied food. Reports indicate that children frequently die while working, having been forced to work under extreme conditions.

Forced Labor, Child Labor
Nigeria Gravel (Crushed Stones)

There are reports that children, mostly boys as young as age four, are forced to excavate and process gravel in Nigeria. According to reports from the media and government raids, 5,000 children from Nigeria and Benin are working in forced gravel production in Nigeria. The children are trafficked from Benin and forced to work, on average for a total of six years, in gravel pits in the Ogun, Osun, and Oyo states. An NGO study revealed that hundreds of children had been trafficked from Zou province in Benin to work in gravel production; other reports have found that hundreds of children have been rescued from this forced labor and returned to other areas in Benin. These children are forced to work excessive hours and to sleep in the bush near the pits. They are threatened with physical violence and tortured by the work gang leaders, particularly if they fail to meet their daily work quotas. The children are forced to work under extreme, sometimes fatal, conditions.

Forced Labor, Child Labor
Nigeria Manioc/Cassava Child Labor
Nigeria Sand Child Labor
Pakistan Surgical Instruments Child Labor
Pakistan Glass Bangles Child Labor
Pakistan Leather Child Labor
Pakistan Bricks

There are reports that children in Pakistan work under conditions of forced labor producing bricks. According to the most recently available data from the media, the ILO, and a university study, there are hundreds of thousands of these children across Pakistan. The brick industry uses a system of bonded labor under which children, from a very young age, often work alongside their debt-bonded families. Because the debts are sometimes inherited, many children are born into the bonded labor. Under the Pakistani “peshgis” bondage system, families are not free to leave the kiln, and are forced to produce quotas of 1,000 or more bricks per day under threat of physical violence or death. Brick workers, including children, are forced to work without masks, goggles, gloves, shoes, or other safety equipment.

Forced Labor, Child Labor
Pakistan Sugarcane Forced Labor
Pakistan Cotton Forced Labor
Pakistan Carpets

There are reports that children as young as age five are forced to work in the production of carpets, often through a system of bonded labor. Based on reports from the ILO and the Organization for Economic Co-Operation and Development (OECD), as many as half a million children have been producing carpets under conditions of forced labor throughout the country. Children of migrants, refugees, and impoverished families are particularly vulnerable to this practice. Typical of the Pakistani “peshgis” system, children are often sent to work to pay off their family's debt. Families accept a loan in the form of advanced payment for a year of their child's work, and the child is prohibited from leaving the workplace until the debt is paid in full. The children live in the workplace, away from their families, and do not have the freedom to leave. Some children are forced to work without equipment to protect them from exposure to toxic chemicals and dust. The children are paid little, and deductions are taken from their wages for food and shelter. Some children are fined or beaten for any mistakes.

Forced Labor, Child Labor
Pakistan Coal

There are reports that children as young as age five are forced to work in coal mines in Balochistan, Punjab, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, and the Northwest Frontier Province. Some of these children work as bonded labor; under this arrangement, which is typical of the Pakistani “peshgis” system, children work alongside, or in place of, other members of their indebted families. The children are forced to work without protective equipment. Their work involves blasting rocks with dynamite and digging to extract coal in deep narrow shafts below ground. The children are also forced to lead donkeys deep underground and lead them back out hauling the mined coal.

Forced Labor, Child Labor
Pakistan Wheat Forced Labor
Panama Coffee Child Labor
Panama Melons Child Labor
Panama Sugarcane Child Labor
Paraguay Hogs

There is evidence that children ages 5 to 17 raise hogs in Paraguay. In 2016, the Government of Paraguay published representative results from the Survey of Activities of Rural Area Children and Adolescents 2015. The survey considers a working child to be engaged in child labor if the child is below the minimum age for employment of 14 or the child is performing work that is hazardous according to national legislation. The survey estimates that 301,827 children ages 5 to 17 perform hazardous work in rural areas of Paraguay and indicates that children working in agriculture experience accidents and illnesses, including from using dangerous tools and handling chemicals. According to the survey, almost 13 percent of Paraguayan children engaged in child labor in agriculture do not attend school. The survey estimates that 199,333 child laborers raise hogs throughout Paraguay. Approximately 120,414 child laborers raising hogs are below the minimum age for employment in Paraguay. The survey indicates that more boys than girls are engaged in child labor in hog raising. The release of this survey demonstrates the Government of Paraguay’s commitment to addressing child labor and its acknowledgement that data collection is vital to the design and implementation of sound policies and programs.
Spanish Translation

Child Labor
Paraguay Lettuce

There is evidence that children ages 5 to 17 grow lettuce in Paraguay. In 2016, the Government of Paraguay published representative results from the Survey of Activities of Rural Area Children and Adolescents 2015. The survey considers a working child to be engaged in child labor if the child is below the minimum age for employment of 14 or the child is performing work that is hazardous according to national legislation. The survey estimates that 301,827 children ages 5 to 17 perform hazardous work in rural areas of Paraguay and indicates that children working in agriculture experience accidents and illnesses, including from using dangerous tools and handling chemicals. According to the survey, almost 13 percent of Paraguayan children engaged in child labor in agriculture do not attend school. The survey estimates that 9,397 child laborers grow lettuce throughout rural areas in Paraguay. Approximately 5,915 child laborers growing lettuce are below the minimum age for employment in Paraguay. The release of this survey demonstrates the Government of Paraguay’s commitment to addressing child labor and its acknowledgement that data collection is vital to the design and implementation of sound policies and programs.
Spanish Translation

Child Labor
Paraguay Peanuts

There is evidence that children ages 5 to 17 grow peanuts in Paraguay. In 2016, the Government of Paraguay published representative results from the Survey of Activities of Rural Area Children and Adolescents 2015, a representative survey of children’s work in rural areas. The survey considers a working child to be engaged in child labor if the child is below the minimum age for employment of 14 or the child is performing work that is hazardous according to national legislation. The survey estimates that 301,827 children ages 5 to 17 perform hazardous work in rural areas of Paraguay and indicates that children working in agriculture experience accidents and illnesses, including from using dangerous tools and handling chemicals. According to the survey, almost 13 percent of Paraguayan children engaged in child labor in agriculture do not attend school. The survey estimates that 33,165 child laborers grow peanuts throughout rural areas in Paraguay. Approximately 15,384 child laborers growing peanuts are below the minimum age for employment in Paraguay. The survey indicates that more boys than girls are engaged in child labor producing peanuts. The release of this survey demonstrates the Government of Paraguay’s commitment to addressing child labor and its acknowledgement that data collection is vital to the design and implementation of sound policies and programs.
Spanish Translation

Child Labor
Paraguay Peppers

There is evidence that children ages 5 to 17 grow peppers in Paraguay. In 2016, the Government of Paraguay published representative results from the Survey of Activities of Rural Area Children and Adolescents 2015. The survey considers a working child to be engaged in child labor if the child is below the minimum age for employment of 14 or the child is performing work that is hazardous according to national legislation. The survey estimates that 301,827 children ages 5 to 17 perform hazardous work in rural areas of Paraguay and indicates that children working in agriculture experience accidents and illnesses, including from using dangerous tools and handling chemicals. According to the survey, almost 13 percent of Paraguayan children engaged in child labor in agriculture do not attend school. The survey estimates that 6,594 child laborers grow peppers throughout rural areas in Paraguay. The survey indicates that more boys than girls are engaged in child labor producing peppers. The release of this survey demonstrates the Government of Paraguay’s commitment to addressing child labor and its acknowledgement that data collection is vital to the design and implementation of sound policies and programs.
Spanish Translation

Child Labor
Paraguay Sesame

There is evidence that children ages 5 to 17 grow sesame in Paraguay. In 2016, the Government of Paraguay published representative results from the Survey of Activities of Rural Area Children and Adolescents 2015. The survey considers a working child to be engaged in child labor if the child is below the minimum age for employment of 14 or the child is performing work that is hazardous according to national legislation. The survey estimates that 301,827 children ages 5 to 17 perform hazardous work in rural areas of Paraguay and indicates that children working in agriculture experience accidents and illnesses, including from using dangerous tools and handling chemicals. According to the survey, almost 13 percent of Paraguayan children engaged in child labor in agriculture do not attend school. The survey estimates that 17,670 child laborers grow sesame throughout rural areas in Paraguay. Approximately 5,793 child laborers growing sesame are below the minimum age for employment in Paraguay. The survey indicates that more boys than girls are engaged in child labor producing sesame. The release of this survey demonstrates the Government of Paraguay’s commitment to addressing child labor and its acknowledgement that data collection is vital to the design and implementation of sound policies and programs.
Spanish Translation

Child Labor
Paraguay Sweet Potatoes

There is evidence that children ages 5 to 17 grow sweet potatoes in Paraguay. In 2016, the Government of Paraguay published representative results from the Survey of Activities of Rural Area Children and Adolescents 2015. The survey considers a working child to be engaged in child labor if the child is below the minimum age for employment of 14 or the child is performing work that is hazardous according to national legislation. The survey estimates that 301,827 children ages 5 to 17 perform hazardous work in rural areas of Paraguay and indicates that children working in agriculture experience accidents and illnesses, including from using dangerous tools and handling chemicals. According to the survey, almost 13 percent of Paraguayan children engaged in child labor in agriculture do not attend school. The survey estimates that 8,143 child laborers grow sweet potatoes throughout rural areas in Paraguay. Approximately 4,912 of child laborers growing sweet potatoes are below the minimum age for employment in Paraguay. The survey indicates that more boys than girls are engaged in child labor producing sweet potatoes. The release of this survey demonstrates the Government of Paraguay’s commitment to addressing child labor and its acknowledgement that data collection is vital to the design and implementation of sound policies and programs.
Spanish Translation

Child Labor
Paraguay Goats

There is evidence that children ages 5 to 17 raise goats in Paraguay. In 2016, the Government of Paraguay published results from the Survey of Activities of Rural Area Children and Adolescents 2015, a representative survey of children’s work in rural areas. The survey considers a working child to be engaged in child labor if the child is below the minimum age for employment of 14 or the child is performing work that is hazardous according to national legislation. The survey estimates that 301,827 children ages 5 to 17 perform hazardous work in rural areas of Paraguay and indicates that children working in agriculture experience accidents and illnesses, including from using dangerous tools and handling chemicals. According to the survey, almost 13 percent of Paraguayan children engaged in child labor in agriculture do not attend school. The survey estimates that 8,584 child laborers raise goats throughout rural areas in Paraguay. Approximately 4,714 child laborers raising goats are below the minimum age for employment in Paraguay. The survey indicates that more boys than girls are engaged in child labor in goat raising. The release of this survey demonstrates the Government of Paraguay’s commitment to addressing child labor and its acknowledgement that data collection is vital to the design and implementation of sound policies and programs.
Spanish Translation

Child Labor
Paraguay Melons

There is evidence that children ages 5 to 17 grow melons in Paraguay. In 2016, the Government of Paraguay published representative results from the Survey of Activities of Rural Area Children and Adolescents 2015. The survey considers a working child to be engaged in child labor if the child is below the minimum age for employment of 14 or the child is performing work that is hazardous according to national legislation. The survey estimates that 301,827 children ages 5 to 17 perform hazardous work in rural areas of Paraguay and indicates that children working in agriculture experience accidents and illnesses, including from using dangerous tools and handling chemicals. According to the survey, almost 13 percent of Paraguayan children engaged in child labor in agriculture do not attend school. The survey estimates that 8,879 child laborers grow watermelons and 5,292 child laborers grow melons throughout rural areas in Paraguay. Approximately 4,879 child laborers growing watermelons are under the minimum age for employment in Paraguay. The survey indicates that more boys are engaged in child labor producing watermelons and melons than girls. The release of this survey demonstrates the Government of Paraguay’s commitment to addressing child labor and its acknowledgement that data collection is vital to the design and implementation of sound policies and programs.
Spanish Translation

Child Labor
Paraguay Fish

There is evidence that children ages 5 to 17 are engaged in fishing in Paraguay. In 2016, the Government of Paraguay published representative results from the Survey of Activities of Rural Area Children and Adolescents 2015. The survey considers a working child to be engaged in child labor if the child is below the minimum age for employment of 14 or the child is performing work that is hazardous according to national legislation. The survey estimates that 301,827 children ages 5 to 17 perform hazardous work in rural areas of Paraguay and indicates that children working in agriculture experience accidents and illnesses, including from using dangerous tools and handling chemicals. According to the survey, almost 13 percent of Paraguayan children engaged in child labor in agriculture do not attend school. The survey estimates that 20,188 child laborers work in fishing throughout rural areas in Paraguay. Of these children, 20,082 handle hooks or harpoons; 18,886 prepare bait; and 11,475 clean fish. Approximately 11,023 child laborers working in fishing are below the minimum age for employment in Paraguay. The survey indicates that more boys than girls are engaged in child labor in fishing. The release of this survey demonstrates the Government of Paraguay’s commitment to addressing child labor and its acknowledgement that data collection is vital to the design and implementation of sound policies and programs.
Spanish Translation

Child Labor
Paraguay Tomatoes

There is evidence that children ages 5 to 17 grow tomatoes in Paraguay. In 2016, the Government of Paraguay published representative results from the Survey of Activities of Rural Area Children and Adolescents 2015. The survey considers a working child to be engaged in child labor if the child is below the minimum age for employment of 14 or the child is performing work that is hazardous according to national legislation. The survey estimates that 301,827 children ages 5 to 17 perform hazardous work in rural areas of Paraguay and indicates that children working in agriculture experience accidents and illnesses, including from using dangerous tools and handling chemicals. According to the survey, almost 13 percent of Paraguayan children engaged in child labor in agriculture do not attend school. The survey estimates that 13,095 child laborers grow tomatoes throughout rural areas in Paraguay. Approximately 6,363 child laborers growing tomatoes are below the minimum age for employment in Paraguay. The survey indicates that more boys than girls are engaged in child labor producing tomatoes. The release of this survey demonstrates the Government of Paraguay’s commitment to addressing child labor and its acknowledgement that data collection is vital to the design and implementation of sound policies and programs.
Spanish Translation

Child Labor
Paraguay Bricks Child Labor
Paraguay Pornography Child Labor
Paraguay Stones (Limestone) Child Labor
Paraguay Sheep

There is evidence that children ages 5 to 17 raise sheep in Paraguay. In 2016, the Government of Paraguay published representative results from the Survey of Activities of Rural Area Children and Adolescents 2015, a representative survey of children’s work in rural areas. The survey considers a working child to be engaged in child labor if the child is below the minimum age for employment of 14 or the child is performing work that is hazardous according to national legislation. The survey estimates that 301,827 children ages 5 to 17 perform hazardous work in rural areas of Paraguay and indicates that children working in agriculture experience accidents and illnesses, including from using dangerous tools and handling chemicals. According to the survey, almost 13 percent of Paraguayan children engaged in child labor in agriculture do not attend school. The survey estimates that 9,790 child laborers raise sheep throughout rural areas in Paraguay. Approximately 4,856 child laborers raising sheep are below the minimum age for employment in Paraguay. The survey indicates that more boys than girls are engaged in child labor in sheep raising. The release of this survey demonstrates the Government of Paraguay’s commitment to addressing child labor and its acknowledgement that data collection is vital to the design and implementation of sound policies and programs.
Spanish Translation

Child Labor
Paraguay Cattle Forced Labor
Paraguay Cotton Child Labor
Paraguay Corn

There is evidence that children ages 5 to 17 grow corn in Paraguay. In 2016, the Government of Paraguay published representative results from the Survey of Activities of Rural Area Children and Adolescents 2015. The survey considers a working child to be engaged in child labor if the child is below the minimum age for employment of 14 or the child is performing work that is hazardous according to national legislation. The survey estimates that 301,827 children ages 5 to 17 perform hazardous work in rural areas of Paraguay and indicates that children working in agriculture experience accidents and illnesses, including from using dangerous tools and handling chemicals. According to the survey, almost 13 percent of Paraguayan children engaged in child labor in agriculture do not attend school. The survey estimates that 92,208 child laborers grow the tupí variety of corn and 89,293 child laborers grow the chipá (canary) variety of corn throughout rural areas in Paraguay. Approximately 38,584 children growing tupí corn and 37,598 children growing chipá (canary) corn are below the minimum age for employment in Paraguay. The survey indicates that more boys than girls are engaged in child labor producing corn. The release of this survey demonstrates the Government of Paraguay’s commitment to addressing child labor and its acknowledgement that data collection is vital to the design and implementation of sound policies and programs.
Spanish Translation

Child Labor
Paraguay Onions

There is evidence that children ages 5 to 17 grow onions in Paraguay. In 2016, the Government of Paraguay published representative results from the Survey of Activities of Rural Area Children and Adolescents 2015. The survey considers a working child to be engaged in child labor if the child is below the minimum age for employment of 14 or the child is performing work that is hazardous according to national legislation. The survey estimates that 301,827 children ages 5 to 17 perform hazardous work in rural areas of Paraguay and indicates that children working in agriculture experience accidents and illnesses, including from using dangerous tools and handling chemicals. According to the survey, almost 13 percent of Paraguayan children engaged in child labor in agriculture do not attend school. The survey estimates that 5,937 child laborers grow onions (cebollita en hoja) throughout rural areas in Paraguay. Approximately 3,850 child laborers growing onions (cebollita en hoja) are below the minimum age for employment in Paraguay. The release of this survey demonstrates the Government of Paraguay’s commitment to addressing child labor and its acknowledgement that data collection is vital to the design and implementation of sound policies and programs.
Spanish Translation

Child Labor
Paraguay Manioc/Cassava

There is evidence that children ages 5 to 17 grow manioc/cassava in Paraguay. In 2016, the Government of Paraguay published representative results from the Survey of Activities of Rural Area Children and Adolescents 2015. The survey considers a working child to be engaged in child labor if the child is below the minimum age for employment of 14 or the child is performing work that is hazardous according to national legislation. The survey estimates that 301,827 children ages 5 to 17 perform hazardous work in rural areas of Paraguay and indicates that children working in agriculture experience accidents and illnesses, including from using dangerous tools and handling chemicals. According to the survey, almost 13 percent of Paraguayan children engaged in child labor in agriculture do not attend school. The survey estimates that 159,167 child laborers grow manioc/cassava throughout rural areas in Paraguay. Approximately 71,932 child laborers growing manioc/cassava are below the minimum age for employment in Paraguay. The survey indicates that more boys than girls are engaged in child labor producing manioc/cassava. The release of this survey demonstrates the Government of Paraguay’s commitment to addressing child labor and its acknowledgement that data collection is vital to the design and implementation of sound policies and programs.
Spanish Translation

Child Labor
Paraguay Beans

There is evidence that children ages 5 to 17 grow beans in Paraguay. In 2016, the Government of Paraguay published representative results from the Survey of Activities of Rural Area Children and Adolescents 2015. The survey considers a working child to be engaged in child labor if the child is below the minimum age for employment of 14 or is performing work that is hazardous according to national legislation. The survey estimates that 301,827 children ages 5 to 17 perform hazardous work in rural areas of Paraguay and indicates that children working in agriculture experience accidents and illnesses, including from using dangerous tools and handling chemicals. According to the survey, almost 13 percent of Paraguayan children engaged in child labor in agriculture do not attend school. The survey estimates that 71,839 child laborers grow poroto beans throughout rural areas in Paraguay. Approximately 31,372 of child laborers growing poroto beans are below the minimum age for employment in Paraguay. The survey indicates that child labor also occurs in the cultivation of other varieties of beans, including habilla, poroto manteca, and feijao, and that more boys than girls are engaged in child labor producing beans. The release of this survey demonstrates the Government of Paraguay’s commitment to addressing child labor and its acknowledgement that data collection is vital to the design and implementation of sound policies and programs.
Spanish Translation

Child Labor
Paraguay Cabbages

There is evidence that children ages 5 to 17 grow cabbages in Paraguay. In 2016, the Government of Paraguay published representative results from the Survey of Activities of Rural Area Children and Adolescents 2015. The survey considers a working child to be engaged in child labor if the child is below the minimum age for employment of 14 or the child is performing work that is hazardous according to national legislation. The survey estimates that 301,827 children ages 5 to 17 perform hazardous work in rural areas of Paraguay and indicates that children working in agriculture experience accidents and illnesses, including from using dangerous tools and handling chemicals. According to the survey, almost 13 percent of Paraguayan children engaged in child labor in agriculture do not attend school. The survey estimates that 4,146 child laborers grow cabbages throughout rural areas in Paraguay. The release of this survey demonstrates the Government of Paraguay’s commitment to addressing child labor and its acknowledgement that data collection is vital to the design and implementation of sound policies and programs.
Spanish Translation

Child Labor
Paraguay Poultry

There is evidence that children ages 5 to 17 raise poultry in Paraguay. In 2016, the Government of Paraguay published representative results from the Survey of Activities of Rural Area Children and Adolescents 2015. The survey considers a working child to be engaged in child labor if the child is below the minimum age for employment of 14 or the child is performing work that is hazardous according to national legislation. The survey estimates that 301,827 children ages 5 to 17 perform hazardous work in rural areas of Paraguay and indicates that children working in agriculture experience accidents and illnesses, including from using dangerous tools and handling chemicals. According to the survey, almost 13 percent of Paraguayan children engaged in child labor in agriculture do not attend school. The survey estimates that 297,598 child laborers raise poultry throughout rural Paraguay. Approximately 196,572 child laborers raising poultry are below the minimum age for employment in Paraguay. The release of this survey demonstrates the Government of Paraguay’s commitment to addressing child labor and its acknowledgement that data collection is vital to the design and implementation of sound policies and programs.
Spanish Translation

Child Labor
Paraguay Carrots

There is evidence that children ages 5 to 17 grow carrots in Paraguay. In 2016, the Government of Paraguay published representative results from the Survey of Activities of Rural Area Children and Adolescents 2015. The survey considers a working child to be engaged in child labor if the child is below the minimum age for employment of 14 or the child is performing work that is hazardous according to national legislation. The survey estimates that 301,827 children ages 5 to 17 perform hazardous work in rural areas of Paraguay and indicates that children working in agriculture experience accidents and illnesses, including from using dangerous tools and handling chemicals. According to the survey, almost 13 percent of Paraguayan children engaged in child labor in agriculture do not attend school. The survey estimates that 4,877 child laborers grow carrots throughout rural areas in Paraguay. The release of this survey demonstrates the Government of Paraguay’s commitment to addressing child labor and its acknowledgement that data collection is vital to the design and implementation of sound policies and programs.
Spanish Translation

Child Labor
Paraguay Yerba Mate (Stimulant Plant)

There is evidence that children ages 5 to 17 grow yerba mate (stimulant plant) in Paraguay. In 2016, the Government of Paraguay published representative results from the Survey of Activities of Rural Area Children and Adolescents 2015. The survey considers a working child to be engaged in child labor if the child is below the minimum age for employment of 14 or the child is performing work that is hazardous according to national legislation. The survey estimates that 301,827 children ages 5 to 17 perform hazardous work in rural areas of Paraguay and indicates that children working in agriculture experience accidents and illnesses, including from using dangerous tools and handling chemicals. According to the survey, almost 13 percent of Paraguayan children engaged in child labor in agriculture do not attend school. The survey estimates that estimated 3,464 child laborers grow yerba mate throughout rural areas in Paraguay. The survey indicates that more boys than girls are engaged in child labor producing yerba mate. The release of this survey demonstrates the Government of Paraguay’s commitment to addressing child labor and its acknowledgement that data collection is vital to the design and implementation of sound policies and programs.
Spanish Translation

Child Labor
Paraguay Cattle

There is evidence that children ages 5 to 17 raise cattle in Paraguay. National legislation designates cattle raising as a hazardous activity prohibited for children in Paraguay. In 2016, the Government of Paraguay published representative results from the Survey of Activities of Rural Area Children and Adolescents 2015. The survey considers a working child to be engaged in child labor if the child is below the minimum age for employment of 14 or the child is performing work that is hazardous according to national legislation. The survey estimates that 301,827 children ages 5 to 17 perform hazardous work in rural areas of Paraguay and indicates that children working in agriculture experience accidents and illnesses, including from using dangerous tools and handling chemicals. According to the survey, almost 13 percent of Paraguayan children engaged in child labor in agriculture do not attend school. The survey estimates that 142,127 child laborers raise cattle throughout rural areas in Paraguay. Approximately 67,141 child laborers raising cattle are below the minimum age for employment in Paraguay. The survey indicates that more boys than girls are engaged in child labor in cattle raising. The release of this survey demonstrates the Government of Paraguay’s commitment to addressing child labor and its acknowledgement that data collection is vital to the design and implementation of sound policies and programs.
Spanish Translation

Child Labor
Peru Coca (Stimulant Plant) Child Labor
Peru Gold Forced Labor, Child Labor
Peru Bricks Child Labor
Peru Brazil Nuts/Chestnuts Forced Labor
Peru Fireworks Child Labor
Peru Timber Forced Labor
Peru Fish Child Labor
Philippines Fish Child Labor
Philippines Pyrotechnics Child Labor
Philippines Fashion Accessories Child Labor
Philippines Coconuts Child Labor
Philippines Gold Child Labor
Philippines Rubber Child Labor
Philippines Rice Child Labor
Philippines Pornography Child Labor
Philippines Sugarcane Child Labor
Philippines Corn Child Labor
Philippines Hogs Child Labor
Philippines Tobacco Child Labor
Philippines Bananas Child Labor
Russia Pornography

There are reports that children are forced to engage in pornography in Russia. According to reports from NGOs, tens of thousands of children were exploited in the production of pornography, and evidence suggests that many of them were forced to do so. The production of child pornography is concentrated in big cities, particularly in St. Petersburg and Moscow. Street children in both cities are particularly vulnerable to exploitation in this industry. Some children are trafficked internally and from the former Soviet republics to engage in pornography in Russia. These children are often subject to various forms of physical abuse while they are exploited in this form of forced labor.
Russian translation

Forced Labor, Child Labor
Russia Bricks

There are reports that adults are forced to produce bricks in Russia. Both men and women are exploited for forced labor in informal brick factories in the Northern Caucasus region of Dagestan; however, victims are primarily male job-seekers recruited in Moscow. According to a local NGO and media reports, hundreds of individuals have been subjected to forced labor in brick factories. Recruiters in Moscow frequently drug and abduct victims who are then sold to brick factory owners in Dagestan. Other victims are recruited through deception regarding the location of work and the anticipated wages. Victims and a local NGO report that factories frequently withhold all wages, sometimes confiscate workers’ passports and cellphones, and sometimes use physical violence, especially when workers try to leave.
Russian Translation

Forced Labor
Russia Timber

There are reports that adults are forced to produce timber in Russia. Adults from North Korea are sent to Russia to produce timber by the North Korean government. According to media reports, approximately 2,000 North Koreans produce timber in Russia. A South Korean NGO reports that North Korean workers in the forestry sector work from 12 to 18 hours a day under growing debts incurred to pay bribes during the selection process. Many workers in the sector are isolated in remote, prison-like logging camps in the far east of the country. An NGO reports that workers are forced to remit 80 percent of their wages to the North Korean government in addition to paying for room and board, and are allowed to keep only $30 to $50 per month, far below the minimum wage. In compliance with UN Security Council Resolution 2397, Russia announced its intention in 2017 to cease issuing or renewing work visas for North Korean workers.
Russian Translation

Forced Labor
Rwanda Tea Child Labor
Senegal Gold Child Labor
Sierra Leone Coffee Child Labor
Sierra Leone Cocoa Child Labor
Sierra Leone Granite Child Labor
Sierra Leone Diamonds

There are reports that children, mostly boys ages 5-17, are forced to mine for diamonds in Sierra Leone. Diamond mines are concentrated in Koidu, Kenema, and Kono districts in the Eastern Province. Some children are trafficked from rural areas to work in diamond mines, or are sent by their families; these children are often recruited under deceptive terms. The children are forced to work, without pay, in hazardous conditions underground in the mines for excessively long hours. Some children are not provided with sufficient food. In addition, some children of artisanal, independent, small-scale diamond miners work with their families as indentured servants, in debt to diamond dealers.

Forced Labor, Child Labor
Sierra Leone Oil (Palm) Child Labor
South Sudan Cattle

There are reports that children, especially boys, are abducted and forced to herd cattle in South Sudan. Hundreds of abductions have been reported, particularly in communities in Jonglei and Eastern Equatoria states. The children are abducted when rival tribes or ethnic groups enter communities to steal cattle, as well as during other inter-ethnic or inter-tribal disputes; some of these children are enslaved to herd cattle.

Forced Labor, Child Labor
Sudan Gold Child Labor
Suriname Gold Child Labor
Tajikistan Cotton

There are reports that children ages 14-17 and some as young as 7 are forced to work during the annual cotton harvest in Tajikistan. Monitoring teams discover multiple cases of compulsory mobilization across several districts of the country each year. In these cases, school officials mobilize classes to work in the harvest and teachers supervise them in the fields. Some children receive threats regarding exams, grades, and even expulsion from school for refusal to work. The children are typically sent to the fields after class hours. Farmers negotiate directly with the schools to mobilize the students to work, and the schools may keep some or all of the children's wages. Some of the children are required to pick a quota of 66 pounds of cotton daily.
Russian translation

Forced Labor, Child Labor
Tanzania Tanzanite (Gems) Child Labor
Tanzania Coffee Child Labor
Tanzania Tea Child Labor
Tanzania Cloves Child Labor
Tanzania Fish (Nile Perch) Child Labor
Tanzania Gold Child Labor
Tanzania Sisal Child Labor
Tanzania Tobacco Child Labor
Thailand Fish Forced Labor
Thailand Shrimp

There are reports that children are forced to process shrimp in Thailand. Burmese and Cambodian immigrants are particularly vulnerable to forced child labor in the shrimp industry. A UN report identified approximately 150 children working, many alongside their mothers, in Klong Yai district near the Cambodia border. Children are often forced to peel and sort shrimp. Some are forced to work long hours without breaks, physically abused, and prohibited from leaving the worksite. They frequently have their identity documents confiscated by their employers. In some cases, child workers are paid little, if at all, and their wages are deducted to repay debts related to recruitment, food, and/or lodging. The children often endure these conditions under the threat of dismissal and arrest by immigration police.
Thai translation

Forced Labor, Child Labor
Thailand Garments

There are reports that mostly girls as young as 11 are forced to produce garments in Thailand. Migrant children from Laos and Burma are particularly vulnerable. The ILO, media, trade unions, government raids, and NGOs report forced child labor in garment factories in Bangkok and along the Burma border in Mae Sai and Mae Sot. Many children live at the worksite, and their freedom of movement is sometimes restricted through confiscation of identity documents and threats of arrest. Children are often forced to work long hours and overtime, and are paid little, if at all. Some are not provided sufficient food and are physically abused. Mistakes made during the course of work are sometimes penalized with wage deductions.
Thai translation

Forced Labor, Child Labor
Thailand Pornography Child Labor
Thailand Sugarcane Child Labor
Turkey Pulses (Legumes) Child Labor
Turkey Peanuts Child Labor
Turkey Footwear

There are reports that children as young as 9 produce footwear in Turkey. Both boys and girls, including many in the Syrian refugee community, are engaged in work activities in this sector. According to international organizations, NGOs, and media sources, there is credible evidence that the use of child labor is common in footwear production, including in major production areas such as Gaziantep and Istanbul. Children work long hours, with some reports of working up to 12 hours per day, 6 days per week. Due to the long hours worked, many child workers in this sector are unable to attend school. Some child laborers in this sector use hazardous chemicals, machinery, and materials.
Turkish Translation

Child Labor
Turkey Cumin Child Labor
Turkey Furniture Child Labor
Turkey Citrus Fruits Child Labor
Turkey Sugar Beets Child Labor
Turkey Cotton Child Labor
Turkey Hazelnuts Child Labor
Turkey Garments

There are reports that children as young as 10 produce garments in Turkey. Both boys and girls, including many in the Syrian refugee community, are engaged in work activities in this sector. According to international organizations, NGOs, and media sources, there is credible evidence of the use of child labor in small and medium-sized garment manufacturers in various cities nationwide, including Gaziantep, Istanbul, Ankara, and Izmir. Children work long hours, with some reporting working up to 15 hours per day, 6 days per week, and earn exceptionally low wages. Due to the long hours worked, many child laborers in this sector are unable to attend school. Reports indicate that conditions of work in the garment industry are often poor, with crowded, informal workshops often lacking proper ventilation and reaching high temperatures in the summer.
Turkish Translation

Child Labor
Turkmenistan Cotton Forced Labor, Child Labor
Uganda Tobacco Child Labor
Uganda Fish Child Labor
Uganda Charcoal Child Labor
Uganda Coffee Child Labor
Uganda Stones

There are reports that children as young as age 7 work in stone quarries in Uganda. Children, primarily boys, quarry and break stone in 3 of the 4 regions of Uganda. Areas of particular concern for children working in quarries include the northeastern Karamoja region and Central Uganda. The Uganda Bureau of Statistics estimates that 2,124 workers are involved in formal employment in stone quarrying; the majority of these work in quarries in Central Uganda. However, many workers are also known to quarry stone in informal, artisanal quarries, including many children. According to international organizations, media sources, and the U.S. Department of State, numerous incidents of children quarrying and breaking stone have been reported across the country and most notably in the northeastern Karamoja region. This work prevents children from attending school. In addition, children are exposed to loud noises, dust, long hours in extreme heat, and injury from flying stone fragments. Accidents from quarrying stone have resulted in loss of limbs, broken spinal cords, and loss of sight.
Swahili translation

Child Labor
Uganda Tea Child Labor
Uganda Bricks Child Labor
Uganda Rice Child Labor
Uganda Gold

There are reports that children as young as age 7 mine gold in Uganda. This practice is especially common in eastern Uganda and in the northeastern Karamoja region, where children typically work alongside family members. According to international organizations and the media, thousands of children abandon school to work in ASGM. One research study found approximately 1,000 children working in gold mines in central Uganda. Boys work in dangerous conditions in the mines, collecting soil from deep, open pits. Children mine gold in riverbeds, use toxic mercury to process gold ore, and carry water from long distances to sift and wash sediment.
Swahili translation

Child Labor
Uganda Sugarcane Child Labor
Uganda Vanilla Child Labor
Uganda Cattle Child Labor
Uganda Sand

There are reports that school-aged children harvest sand in Uganda, particularly in the Central, Eastern, and Northeastern regions of the country. According to a Government of Uganda official, sand harvesting is one of the main occupations in which child laborers work. Children harvest sand for long hours, which prevents them from attending school. Children dive underwater, scoop up sand, and transport it to boats on the river bank. This work exposes children to severe health and safety hazards, including drowning, injury, and water-borne disease.

Child Labor
Ukraine Amber

There are reports that children as young as 7 engage in illegal amber extraction in Ukraine. Children from low-income families in the Polesia region of western Ukraine, including in Rivne, Volyn, and Zhytomyr Oblasts, are particularly vulnerable to involvement in amber extraction. For example, one human rights organization reports that thousands of school children extract amber, and that their labor is essential to the amber industry. According to media reports and local government officials, child labor is systemic in the illegal amber extraction industry and is a growing problem. The amber extraction process creates large pits and exposes children to risk of injuries when extraction pits collapse. Children engaged in illegal amber extraction are also at risk of violence at the mining site.
Ukrainian Translation

Child Labor
Ukraine Pornography Child Labor
Ukraine Coal Child Labor
Uzbekistan Silk Cocoons

There are reports that adults are forced to cultivate silk cocoons in Uzbekistan. A silk cocoon is the protective casing a silkworm spins around itself before metamorphosing into a moth. Silk cocoons can be processed and unwound to produce silk thread. Forced labor in cocoon production predominantly occurs among farmers in the south of the country, although evidence suggests that other rural families are also subjected to forced labor in this sector. Based on estimates from the Uzbek-German Forum, a majority of the over 45,000 farmers in Uzbekistan who produce silk cocoons each year do not have the freedom to refuse this work; they are compelled to perform it by government officials. Regional- and district-level officials assign each farmer a quota for the production of silk cocoons, and threaten farmers with fines, the loss of their leased farmland, or physical violence if they fail to meet the quota. Farmers are required to sell their silk cocoons back to the government at an official procurement price, which can be too low to offset the cost of cultivating the cocoons, and often experience underpayment, delayed payment, or receive no payment at all. Regional- and district-level governments also impose quotas on neighborhood councils called mahallas, which use their authority over distribution of social benefit payments to force neighborhood residents to cultivate silk cocoons. Because silkworms require constant attention and the maintenance of a carefully controlled environment in order to survive, farmers and rural families often cultivate cocoons in several rooms of their own homes and many work more than 20 hours a day during the approximately month-long cultivation period.
Uzbek translation

Forced Labor
Uzbekistan Cotton

There are reports that children in Uzbekistan are forced to harvest cotton through a government-controlled system of forced labor. Based on the most recently available information from the ILO, U.S. Department of State, and NGOs, thousands of children are forced each year to work in the cotton fields. In previous years, children as young as seven had been mobilized to harvest cotton. However, since 2012, most of these children are ages 15-17, with a few reported instances of students as young as 10 sent to the fields. This forced mobilization of children takes place in various areas of the country, including Tashkent and the Karakalpakstan region. School officials, under the direction of government administrators, force the children to pick quotas of up to 130 pounds of cotton daily for several weeks each fall. Some students who refuse to participate in the cotton harvest or fail to meet their quota risk physical abuse, police intimidation, low grades, or expulsion from school. During the harvest, some children are forced to sleep close to the fields in repurposed public buildings, tents or sheds. In addition, these children are paid little, if at all, after wage deductions for fines, food, and other expenses.
Uzbek translation

Forced Labor, Child Labor
Vietnam Cashews

There is evidence that children ages 5 to 17 grow cashews in Vietnam. According to the Government of Vietnam’s National Child Labor Survey 2012, the results of which were published in 2014, an estimated 14,469 child laborers work to grow cashews. Approximately 55.7 percent, or 8,059, of these child laborers are under 15 years old, which is the minimum age for employment in Vietnam. Of the estimated 14,469 child laborers who grow cashews, 24.3 percent are 5-11 years old, 31.4 percent are 12-14 years old, and 44.3 percent are 15-17 years old. The survey considers a child to be engaged in child labor if the child is working an excessive number of hours per week for his or her age, or if the child is engaged in work that is prohibited for underage employees according to national legislation.
Vietnamese translation

Child Labor
Vietnam Tobacco

There is evidence that children ages 5 to 17 grow tobacco in Vietnam. The results of the Government of Vietnam’s National Child Labor Survey 2012, published in 2014, show that an estimated 2,555 child laborers are involved in growing tobacco. Approximately 26.4 percent, or 675, of the total number of child laborers who grow tobacco are 5-11 years old, while 73.6 percent, or 1,880, are 15-17 years old. The survey considers a child to be engaged in child labor if the child is working an excessive number of hours per week for his or her age, or if the child is engaged in work that is prohibited for underage employees according to national legislation.
Vietnamese translation

Child Labor
Vietnam Pepper

There is evidence that children ages 5 to 17 grow pepper in Vietnam. Based on the Government of Vietnam’s National Child Labor Survey 2012, the results of which were published in 2014, an estimated 9,833 child laborers are involved in growing pepper. Approximately 49.9 percent, or 4,907, of these child laborers are under 15 years old, which is the minimum age for employment in Vietnam. Of the estimated 9,833 child laborers who grow pepper, 10.4 percent are 5-11 years old, 39.5 percent are 12-14 years old, and 50 percent are 15-17 years old. The survey considers a child to be engaged in child labor if the child is working an excessive number of hours per week for his or her age, or if the child is engaged in work that is prohibited for underage employees according to national legislation.
Vietnamese translation

Child Labor
Vietnam Fish

There is evidence that children ages 5 to 17 are engaged in fishing and fish processing in Vietnam. Based on the Government of Vietnam’s National Child Labor Survey 2012, the results of which were published in 2014, an estimated 49,390 child laborers work in fishing. Approximately 90 percent of children involved in child labor in fishing are boys. Of the 49,390 child laborers working in fishing, 19,629 children worked in fishing for more than 42 hours a week. In addition, 38,753 of the total number of child laborers working in fishing were involved in work that could be considered hazardous according to national legislation. The National Child Labor Survey also indicates that an estimated 15,720 child laborers are involved in the production, processing, and preservation of fish and fish products. Of the 15,270 child laborers involved in these activities, 11,591 children worked for more than 42 hours a week. In addition, 13,230 of the total number of child laborers working in the production, processing, and preservation of fish products, were involved in work that could be considered hazardous. The survey considers a child to be engaged in child labor if the child is working an excessive number of hours per week for his or her age, or if the child is engaged in work that is prohibited for underage employees according to national legislation.
Vietnamese translation

Child Labor
Vietnam Furniture

There is evidence that children ages 5 to17 produce furniture in Vietnam. According to the Government of Vietnam’s National Child Labor Survey 2012, the results of which were published in 2014, an estimated 24,377 child laborers work in the production of furniture, including beds, wardrobes, chairs, and tables. Nearly three-quarters of child laborers involved in this activity are boys. Of the 24,377 child laborers engaged in the production of furniture, 13,670 children worked in furniture production for more than 42 hours per week. In addition, 21,873 of the total number of child laborers working in the production of furniture were involved in work that could be considered hazardous according to national legislation. The survey considers a child to be engaged in child labor if the child is working an excessive number of hours per week for his or her age, or if the child is engaged in work that is prohibited for underage employees according to national legislation.
Vietnamese translation

Child Labor
Vietnam Coffee

There are reports that children ages 5 to 17 in Vietnam cultivate coffee. The results of the Government of Vietnam’s National Child Labor Survey 2012, published in 2014, show that an estimated 34,131 child laborers grow coffee. Approximately 36.7 percent, or 12,526, of these child laborers are under 15 years old, which is the minimum age for employment in Vietnam. Of the estimated 34,131 child laborers who grow coffee, 9.2 percent are 5-11 years old, 27.5 percent are 12-14 years old, and 63.3 percent are 15-17 years old. The survey considers a child to be engaged in child labor if the child is working an excessive number of hours per week for his or her age, or if the child is engaged in work that is prohibited for underage employees according to national legislation.
Vietnamese Translation

Child Labor
Vietnam Textiles

There is evidence that children ages 5 to 17 in Vietnam produce textiles. Based on the Government of Vietnam’s National Child Labor Survey 2012, the results of which were published in 2014, an estimated 6,049 child laborers work in textile production, mainly in the fabrication and finishing stages of the process. About 42.9 percent, or 2,595, of these child laborers are under 15 years old, which is the minimum age for employment in Vietnam. Of the estimated 6,049 child laborers who produce textiles, about 448 are 5-11 years old, 2,147 are 12-14 years old, and 3,454 are 15-17 years old. Approximately 96 percent of child textile workers are female. The survey considers a child to be engaged in child labor if the child is working an excessive number of hours per week for his or her age, or if the child is engaged in work that is prohibited for underage employees according to national legislation.
Vietnamese translation

Child Labor
Vietnam Leather

There are reports that children ages 5 to 17 in Vietnam produce leather. The results of the Government of Vietnam’s National Child Labor Survey 2012, published in 2014, show that an estimated 1,426 child laborers work in the leather industry, primarily in the tanning and pre-processing stages and in dyeing animal skins. Approximately 74 percent of children involved in child labor in leather production are girls. Out of the estimated 1,426 child laborers who produce leather, about 580 are 12-14 years old and 846 are 15-17 years old. The survey considers a child to be engaged in child labor if the child is working an excessive number of hours per week for his or her age, or if the child is engaged in work that is prohibited for underage employees according to national legislation.
Vietnamese translation

Child Labor
Vietnam Rubber

There is evidence that children ages 5 to 17 in Vietnam cultivate rubber. The results of the Government of Vietnam’s National Child Labor Survey 2012, published in 2014, show that an estimated 10,224 child laborers are involved in growing rubber. Approximately 42.5 percent, or 4,345, of these child laborers are under 15 years old, which is the minimum age for employment in Vietnam. Of the estimated 10,224 child laborers who grow rubber, 22.1 percent are 5-11 years old, 20.4 percent are 12-14 years old, and 57.5 percent are 15-17 years old. The survey considers a child to be engaged in child labor if the child is working an excessive number of hours per week for his or her age, or if the child is engaged in work that is prohibited for underage employees according to national legislation.
Vietnamese translation

Child Labor
Vietnam Tea

There are reports that children ages 5 to 17 in Vietnam grow tea. Based on the Government of Vietnam’s National Child Labor Survey 2012, the results of which were published in 2014, there are 5,933 child laborers involved in the cultivation of tea. Approximately 22.9 percent, or 1,359, of these child laborers are under 15 years old, which is the minimum age for employment in Vietnam. Of the estimated 5,933 child laborers who grow tea, 13.2 percent are 5-11 years old, 9.7 percent are 12-14 years old, and 77.1 percent are 15-17 years old. The survey considers a child to be engaged in child labor if the child is working an excessive number of hours per week for his or her age, or if the child is engaged in work that is prohibited for underage employees according to national legislation.
Vietnamese translation

Child Labor
Vietnam Bricks Child Labor
Vietnam Rice

There is evidence that children ages 5 to 17 are engaged in the cultivation of rice in Vietnam. Based on the Government of Vietnam’s National Child Labor Survey 2012, the results of which were published in 2014, an estimated 278,884 child laborers grow rice. Approximately 32.9 percent, or 91,753, of these child laborers are under 15 years old, which is the minimum age for employment in Vietnam. Of the estimated 278,884 child laborers who grow rice, 13.6 percent are 5-11 years old, 19.3 percent are 12-14 years old, and 67.1 percent are 15-17 years old. The survey considers a child to be engaged in child labor if the child is working an excessive number of hours per week for his or her age, or if the child is engaged in work that is prohibited for underage employees according to national legislation.
Vietnamese translation

Child Labor
Vietnam Garments

There are reports of children ages 10-18 and some as young as 6 who work under conditions of forced labor producing garments in Vietnam. The most recently available information from government raids, NGOs and media reports indicates that groups of children are found in small privately-owned factories and informal workshops. These workplaces are located primarily in and around Ho Chi Minh City; however, many of these children have migrated, or have been trafficked, from the countryside and from central or northern provinces. Many of the children live in the factories; employers prevent the children from leaving through force and/or by withholding their wages. In some cases, employers pay the children only after a full year of work or at the completion of a multi-year contract. Employers refuse to pay the children who leave before the end of the contract; some withhold a portion of the wages dues under the contract in order to force the children to remain an additional year. The children are forced to work long hours, up to 18 hours per day, sometimes late into the night, and with few breaks. Reports indicate that these children are beaten or threatened with physical violence by their employers. In addition, there are reports of children as young as 12 years old found to be working while confined in government-run detention centers. These children are forced to sew garments under threat of physical or other punishments and without pay.
Vietnamese translation

Forced Labor, Child Labor
Vietnam Sugarcane

There is evidence that children ages 5 to 17 grow sugarcane in Vietnam. The results of the Government of Vietnam’s National Child Labor Survey 2012, published in 2014, show that an estimated 28,303 child laborers are involved in growing sugarcane. Approximately 32.6 percent, or 9,227 of these child laborers are under 15 years old, which is the minimum age for employment in Vietnam. Of the estimated 28,303 child laborers who grow sugarcane, 3.9 percent are 5-11 years old, 28.7 percent are 12-14 years old, and 67.4 percent are 15-17 years old. The survey considers a child to be engaged in child labor if the child is working an excessive number of hours per week for his or her age, or if the child is engaged in work that is prohibited for underage employees according to national legislation.
Vietnamese translation

Child Labor
Vietnam Timber

There is evidence that children ages 5 to 17 engage in the production of timber in Vietnam. The results of the Government of Vietnam’s National Child Labor Survey 2012, published in 2014, show that an estimated 58,079 child laborers are involved in logging, including carrying and loading timber. Of the 58,079 child laborers involved in the production of timber, 6,428 children worked in timber production for more than 42 hours per week. Approximately 89 percent of child laborers working in this sector, were involved in work that could be considered hazardous according to national legislation. The survey considers a child to be engaged in child labor if the child is working an excessive number of hours per week for his or her age, or if the child is engaged in work that is prohibited for underage employees according to national legislation.
Vietnamese translation

Child Labor
Vietnam Footwear

There is evidence that children ages 5 to 17 in Vietnam manufacture footwear. Based on the Government of Vietnam’s National Child Labor Survey 2012, the results of which were published in 2014, an estimated 9,756 child laborers work in footwear manufacturing for over 42 hours per week. Approximately 2.2 percent, or 215, of the total number of child laborers who manufacture footwear for over 42 hours per week are 12-14 years old, while 97.8 percent, or 9,541, are 15-17 years old. The survey considers a child to be engaged in child labor if the child is working an excessive number of hours per week for his or her age, or if the child is engaged in work that is prohibited for underage employees according to national legislation.

Child Labor
Yemen Fish Child Labor
Zambia Tobacco Child Labor
Zambia Stones Child Labor
Zambia Cattle Child Labor
Zambia Cotton Child Labor
Zambia Gems Child Labor