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Wage and Hour Division (WHD)

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FOH Field Operations Handbook
arrowChapter 64 Employment of Workers with Disabilities at Special Minimum Wages under Section 14(c)
arrowSection 64j Establishing Objective Standards for Hourly Pay Rates

Section 64j01: How to Determine a Single Commensurate Hourly Rate When the Work Involves Dissimilar Tasks

  • Many hourly paid jobs are composed of dissimilar tasks. In such a situation, if the employer wishes to evaluate an employee on each task, the following steps must be taken. They are the same whether conducted by the employer or the INV.
    1. Subdivide the job into its component tasks.
    2. Time the standard setter(s) to determine the length of time spent in each component task.
    3. Note the ratio of time spent by the standard setter in each component task to the time taken to complete all of the tasks (the job as a whole).
    4. Time the worker with a disability.
    5. Rate the productivity of the worker with a disability.
  • See the following example of janitorial work for a demonstration of this method.
    1. Subdivide the job into its component tasks. Assume that a particular janitorial position requires that the employee (i) move furniture (ii) vacuum (iii) mop and (iv) empty trash. Assume that each of these tasks requires different skills.
    2. Time the standard setter(s) to determine the length of time spent in each component task. This may be done by a stop watch measurement or any other established industrial work measurement technique.
    3. Note the ratio of time spent in each individual task to the time spent in performance of the total job to determine the percentage of time each task takes. In this example, assume that the worker who does not have a disability (standard setter) spends 25% of his or her time in each of the four component janitorial tasks mentioned above.
    4. Time the worker with a disability. To ensure that the standard setter and the worker with a disability perform at levels that can be sustained throughout the workday, it is recommended that they be studied three times, for at least 30 minutes, ideally at different times of day. Time studies of a shorter duration often result in unrealistic productivity rates that cannot be sustained throughout the workday.
    5. Rate the worker with a disability's productivity by following these steps:
      • Divide the standard setter's time by the time of the worker with a disability to get a percentage rating of that worker's productivity in each task. In the following example, assume that the standard is based on the average time of three workers who do not have disabilities and the time for the worker with disabilities is the average of three different tests (see FOH 64j01(b)(4)).
      • Multiply this percentage by the percentage of time that each component took the standard setter. (In this example it was determined that each task took 25% of the standard setter's total time.) This results in a new productivity percentage for each task.
      • Total the four percentages obtained in the previous step.
      • Multiply this percentage by the prevailing wage to get the commensurate rate.
  • The calculations for the above example are demonstrated, step by step, below:
    Study 1: In this example you find that moving furniture takes the worker who does not have a disability 40 minutes and the worker with a disability 65 minutes:
    40/65 =61.5% (or .615)
    .615 x 25%=;15.4% (or .154) [25% of the total was the percentage of time taken by each task.]
    Study 2: Vacuuming takes the worker who does not have a disability 38 minutes and the worker with a disability 50 minutes:

    38/50 = 76% (or .76)
    .76 x 25% = 19% (or .19) [25% of the total was the percentage of time taken by each task.]
    Study 3: Mopping also takes the worker who does not have a disability 38 minutes and the worker with a disability 50 minutes:
    38/50 = 76% (or .76)
    .76 x 25% = 19% (or .19) [25% of the total was the percentage of time taken by each task.]
    Study 4: Emptying trashcans takes the worker who does not have a disability 30 minutes and the worker with a disability 60 minutes:

    30/60 = 50% (or .50)
    .50 x 25% = 12.5% (or .125) [25% of the total was the percentage of time taken by each task.]
    Next, total the results of each of the individual studies:

    Study 1 + Study 2 + Study 3 + Study 4 = Total for Job
    .154+ .19 + .19 + .125 = .659
    In the above example, the work performed by the worker with the disability met the minimum acceptable quality standards established for the job. Based on the quantity of work performed, the worker with a disability is about 66% (65.9%) as productive as the worker who does not have a disability. So if the prevailing wage were $7 per hour, the commensurate wage would be $4.613 ($7.00 X .659).
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