Skip to page content
Office of the Solicitor
Bookmark and Share

Privacy Act Systems - DOL/OIG-5

SYSTEM NAME:

    Audit Information, Tracking and Reporting System US DOL/OIG.

SECURITY CLASSIFICATION:

    Not applicable.

SYSTEM LOCATION:

    Office of Inspector General, U.S. Department of Labor, Frances Perkins Building, 200 Constitution Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20210 and the OIG regional and field offices.

CATEGORIES OF INDIVIDUALS COVERED BY THE SYSTEM:

    Auditors, certain administrative support staff, and contractors of the Office of Inspector General.

CATEGORIES OF RECORDS IN THE SYSTEM:

    Records or information contained in the system may include: (1) employee or OIG contractor; (2) social security number; (3) grade/step; (4) training; (5) audit and investigative case tracking data (e.g. audit/project/report number, program, findings, results, etc.); (6) other statistical information.

AUTHORITY FOR MAINTENANCE OF THE SYSTEM:

    Public Law 95-452, 5 U.S.C. App. 3, Inspector General Act of 1978. Secretary's Order 2-90 dated January 31, 1990 establishing the Office of Inspector General at the Department of Labor.

PURPOSE(S):

    This system is maintained in order to act as a management information system for OIG audit projects and personnel and to assist in the accurate and timely maintenance of information.

ROUTINE USES OF RECORDS MAINTAINED IN THE SYSTEM:

  1. Referral to federal, state, local and foreign investigative and/or prosecutive authorities. A record from a system of records, which indicates either by itself or in combination with other information within the agency's possession a violation or potential violation of law, whether civil, criminal or regulatory and whether arising by general statute or particular program statute, or by regulation, rule or order issued pursuant thereto, may be disclosed as a routine use, to the appropriate federal, foreign, state or local agency or professional organization charged with the responsibility of investigating or prosecuting such violation or charged with enforcing or implementing or investigating or prosecuting such violation or charged with enforcing or implementing the statute or rule, regulation or order issued pursuant thereto.

  2. Introduction to a grand jury. A record from a system of records may be disclosed, as a routine use, to a grand jury agent pursuant either to a federal or state grand jury subpoena or to a prosecution request that such record be released for the purpose of its introduction to a grand jury.

  3. Referral to federal, state, local or professional licensing boards. A record from a system of records may be disclosed, as a routine use, to any governmental, professional or licensing authority when such record reflects on qualifications, either moral, educational or vocational, of an individual seeking to be licensed or to maintain a license.

  4. Disclosure to contractor, grantee or other direct recipient of federal funds to allow such entity to effect corrective action in the agency's best interest. A record from a system of records may be disclosed, as a routine use, to any direct or indirect recipient of federal funds where such record reflects inadequacies with a recipient's personnel, and disclosure of the record is made to permit a recipient to take corrective action beneficial to the Government.

  5. Disclosure to any source, either private or governmental, to the extent necessary to solicit information relevant to any investigation, audit or evaluation. A record from a system of records may be disclosed, as a routine use, to any source, either private or governmental, to the extent necessary to secure from such source information relevant to and sought in furtherance of an investigation, audit, or evaluation.

  6. Disclosure to any domestic or foreign governmental agencies for personnel or other action. A record from a system of records may be disclosed, as a routine use, to a federal, state, local, foreign or international agency, for their use in connection with such entity's assignment, hiring or retention of an individual, issuance of a security clearance, reporting of an investigation of an individual, letting of a contract or issuance of a license, grant or other benefit, to the extent that the information is relevant and necessary to such agency's decision on the matter.

  7. Disclosure to a board of contract appeals, GAO or any other entity hearing a contractor protest or dispute. A record from a system of records may be disclosed, as a routine use, to the United States General Accounting Office, to a board of contract appeals, or to the claims court in bid protest cases or contract dispute cases involving procurement.

  8. Disclosure to domestic or foreign governmental law enforcement agency in order to obtain information relevant to an OIG or DOL decision. A record from a system of records may be disclosed, as a routine use, to a domestic or foreign governmental agency maintaining civil, criminal or other relevant information, in order to obtain information relevant to a OIG or DOL decision concerning the assignment, hiring, or retention of an individual, the issuance of a security clearance, the letting of a contract, or the issuance of a license, grant, or other benefit, or which may be relevant to an OIG or DOL investigation, audit, or evaluation.

  9. Disclosure to OMB or DOJ regarding Freedom of Information Act and Privacy Act advice. Information from a system of records may be disclosed, as a routine use, to the Office of Management and Budget or the Department of Justice in order to obtain advice regarding statutory and other requirements under the Freedom of Information Act or Privacy Act.

  10. Disclosure pursuant to the receipt of a valid subpoena. A record from a system of records may be disclosed, as a routine use, in response to a facially valid subpoena for the record. Disclosure may also be made when a subpoena or order is signed by a judge from a court of competent jurisdiction.

  11. Disclosure to Treasury and DOJ in pursuance of an ex parte court order to obtain taxpayer information from the IRS. A record from a system of records may be disclosed, as a routine use, to the Department of Treasury and the Department of Justice when the OIG seeks an ex parte court order to obtain taxpayer information from the Internal Revenue Service.

  12. Disclosure to a consumer reporting agency in order to obtain relevant investigatory information. A record from a system of records may be disclosed, as a routine use, to a "consumer reporting agency" as that term is defined in the Fair Credit Reporting Act (15 U.S.C. 1681a(f)) and the Federal Claims Collection Act of 1966 (31 U.S.C. 3701(a)(3)), for the purposes of obtaining information in the course of an investigation, audit, or evaluation.

  13. Disclosure in accordance with computer matching laws, regulations and/or guidelines. A record may be disclosed to a federal, state, or local agency for use in computer matching programs to prevent and detect fraud and abuse in benefit programs administered by those agencies, to support civil and criminal law enforcement activities of those agencies and their components, and to collect debts and overpayments owed to the agencies and their components. This routine use does not provide unrestricted access to records for such law enforcement and related anti-fraud activities; each request for disclosure will be considered in light the applicable legal and administrative requirements for the performance of a computer matching program or procedure.

DISCLOSURE TO CONSUMER REPORTING AGENCIES:

    None.

POLICIES AND PRACTICES FOR STORING, RETRIEVING, ACCESSING, RETAINING, AND DISPOSING OF RECORDS IN THE SYSTEM:

STORAGE:

    The records are stored on a variety of mediums including paper, magnetic tapes or discs, and optical digital data discs.

RETRIEVABILITY:

    Records are retrieved by computer using individual name(s) or project/case name.

SAFEGUARDS:

    Direct access is restricted to authorized staff members and contractors of the OIG. Automated records can be accessed only through use of confidential procedures and passwords by authorized personnel in both OIG Headquarters and regional and field offices.

RETENTION AND DISPOSAL:

    Closed files are destroyed after three years.

SYSTEM MANAGER(S) AND ADDRESS:

    Assistant Inspector General for Audit, 200 Constitution Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20210.

NOTIFICATION PROCEDURE:

    Inquiries concerning this system can be directed to:

Disclosure Officer, Office of Inspector General, 200 constitution Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20210. Inquiries must comply with the requirements in 29 CFR Part 71.

RECORDS SOURCE CATEGORIES:

    Official personnel folders; other personnel documents, activity supervisors, audit/investigation report standard forms.

SYSTEMS EXEMPTED FROM CERTAIN PROVISIONS OF THE ACT:

    The Secretary of Labor has promulgated regulations which exempt information contained in this system of records from various provisions of the Privacy Act depending upon the purpose for which the information was gathered and for which it will be used.

    The various law enforcement purposes and the reasons for the exemptions are as follow:

  1. Criminal Law Enforcement: Information compiled for this purpose is exempt from all of the provisions of the Act except the following sections: (b), (c)(1) and (2), (e) (4)(A) through (F), (e)(6), (7), (9), (10), and (11), and (i). This material is exempt because the disclosure and other requirements of the Act would substantially compromise the efficacy and integrity of OIG operations in a number of ways. Indeed, disclosure of even the existence of these files would be problematic. Disclosure could enable suspects to take action to prevent detection of criminal activities, conceal evidence, or escape prosecution.

    Required disclosure of information contained in this system could lead to the intimidation of, or harm to, informants, witnesses and their respective families or OIG personnel and their families.

    Disclosure could invade the privacy of individuals other than subjects and disclose their identity when confidentiality was promised to them. Disclosures from these files could interfere with the integrity of other information which would otherwise be privileged, see, e.g., 5 U.S.C. 552(b)(5), and which could interfere with other important law enforcement concerns, see, e.g., 5 U.S.C. 552(b)(7).

    The requirement that only relevant and necessary information be included in a criminal investigative file is contrary to good investigative practices which require a full and complete inquiry and exhaustion of all potential sources of information. 5 U.S.C. 552a(e)(1). Similarly, maintaining only those records which are accurate, relevant, timely and complete and which assure fairness in a determination is contrary to established investigative techniques.

    5 U.S.C. 552a(e)(5). Requiring investigators to obtain information to the greatest extent practicable directly from the subject individual would be counterproductive to performance of a clandestine criminal investigation. 5 U.S.C. 552a(e)(2). Finally providing notice to an individual interviewed of: the authority of the interviewer, the purpose to which the information provided may be used, the routine uses of that information and the effect upon the individual should he choose not to provide the information sought could discourage the free flow of information in a criminal law enforcement inquiry. 5 U.S.C. 552a(e)(3).

  1. Other Law Enforcement: In accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552a(k)(2), investigatory material compiled for law enforcement purposes (to the extent it is not already exempted by 5 U.S.C. 552a(j)(2)), is exempted from the following provisions of the ACT: (c)(3), (d), (e)(1), (e)(4)(G), (H), and (I), and (f). This material is exempt because the disclosure and other requirements of the Act could substantially compromise the efficacy and integrity of OIG operations. Disclosure could invade the privacy of other individuals and disclose their identity when they were expressly promised confidentiality. Disclosure could interfere with the integrity of information which would otherwise be subject to privileges, see, e.g., 5 U.S.C. 552(b)(5), and which could interfere with other important law enforcement concerns. See, e.g., 5 U.S.C. 552(b)(7).

  2. Protective Services: In accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552a(k)(3) investigatory material maintained in connection with assisting the U.S. Secret Service to provide protective services to the President of the United States or other individuals pursuant to 18 U.S.C. 3056 is exempt from the following section of the ACT: (c)(3), (d), (e)(1), (e)(4)(G), (H), and (I), and (f). This material is exempt in order to enable the OIG to continue its support of the Secret Service without compromising the effectiveness of either agency's activities.

  3. Contract Investigations: In accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552a(k)(5), investigatory material compiled solely for the purpose of determining integrity, suitability, eligibility, or qualifications for a DOL contract is exempt from the following sections of the ACT: (c)(3), (d), (e)(1), (e)(4)(G), (H), and (I) and (f). This exemption was obtained in order to protect from disclosure the identity of a confidential source when an express promise of confidentiality has been given in order to obtain information from sources who would otherwise be unwilling to provide necessary information.