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Office of Workers' Compensation Programs

Division of Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation (DEEOIC)

Part E Resources

EEOICPA Part E — DOL Work Area A - Wage Loss Assessment Report (Dade Moeller & Associates, Inc.)

This report reviews options and identifies recommendations for determining the best sources of information to be used in calculation of the average annual wages prior to the first wage loss, identifies the best sources for determining annual wages following the first wage loss, and details a recommended methodology for determining the wage loss payment under the EEOICPA statute.

This report was provided as guidance to the Department of Labor by contractors who completed research in the area of wage loss.  The recommendations in the report were taken into consideration when developing the Part E procedures for processing claims by the Division of Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation staff.  However, not all of the recommendations were utilized.

Econometrica, Inc.

Econometrica and its subcontractors, National Jewish Research Center and Occupational HealthLink, have completed a project to provide a list of the most prevalent diseases and toxins identified by the DOE Former Worker program, Current Worker program, and other DOE medical screening programs.  The completed project also provides a matrix for use by DOL claims examiners to assist in the claims for compensation made under Part E.  The matrix is a cross-correlation of disease to chemicals and the level of exposure required to cause the disease.  Research identified the medical evidence required for diagnosis, identified options for obtaining impairment ratings, and provides recommendations for implementing the process.

This report was provided as guidance to the Department of Labor by contractors who completed research on toxic exposure.  The recommendations in the report were taken into consideration when developing the Part E procedures for processing claims by the Division of Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation staff.  However, not all of the recommendations were utilized.