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Secretary of Labor Thomas E. Perez
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2013 Sustainability Plan

June 28, 2013

Treasure Island Job Corps Center, San Francisco, CA students install solar panels.





Table of Contents

Policy Statement

Executive Summary

Goal Strategy Table

Goal Analysis Graphs

 

Agency Contact

Charlotte Hayes
Senior Sustainability Officer
Deputy Assistant Secretary for Policy
Office of the Assistant Secretary for
Administration and Management
Hayes.Charlotte@dol.gov




Policy Statement

Department of Labor

The Department of Labor (DOL) is committed to continuing to be a Federal government leader by example in creating a clean energy economy that increases our Nation's prosperity and complies with all environmental and energy statutes, regulations and Executive Orders while carrying out the vision of Good Jobs for Everyone. DOL's priority is to participate actively in the Federal sustainability standards formulation and to continue its substantial efforts to achieve its mission with sustainability as an integral mode of operation. The Department notes that it has a special interest and role in sustainability leadership as it works to increase the number of and train Americans for green jobs.

Though the Department notes that its programs are not involved significantly in substantial greenhouse gas (GHG) emitting production processes, DOL has significant challenges in the sustainability arena. More than 99 percent of the Department's buildings are on 125 Job Corps Center campuses across the Nation comprising aged, unsustainable building stock and its headquarters building was built in the unsustainable-friendly early 1970s. Yet with regard to the Department's nearly 2 million square foot headquarters in Washington DC, the Frances Perkins Building (FPB), we are very proud that our efforts to green the building have not gone unnoticed with the FPB designated an Energy Star facility by the Environmental Protection Agency in December 2008 and again in 2009. Additionally, DOL won the Closing the Circle Award in 2008 for achieving excellence in managing environmental issues related to transportation.

The Department will continue to improve upon achievements already realized to include for example: staying on track for continuing annual average reductions of 3% in electrical usage; continuing to identify ways of reducing the consumption of potable water (the Department used 36 million fewer gallons of water last year and DOL is on-track to meet a 16% water reduction goal by 2015); and ensuring that new covered building stock will be designed to exceed energy efficient, environmentally-friendly engineering standards by 30 percent. With respect to the fleet of almost 4,300 vehicles DOL operates to achieve mission related objectives such as inspections and investigations as well as for implementing job training programs, the Department has achieved a 95% alternative fuel usage rate for vehicles located in EPA-designated metropolitan statistical areas for FY 2007 and FY 2008 and a decrease in total petroleum use by over 10% annually. These are examples of results from the greenhouse gas (GHG) reducing measures that we have been taking and continue to take.

DOL has undertaken a two pronged approach to the reduction in GHG emissions. We helped develop the new government-wide GHG reduction targeting tools and the Public Sector Standard (PSS) for developing inventories of greenhouse gas emissions to allow for collecting and measuring GHG; and, have taken proactively a number of steps in environmental, energy and transportation management activities to reduce GHG emissions. The issues the Department faces in reaching sustainability targets with its Job Corps property portfolio are the most challenging requiring the most work and resources. We are committed to the goal of having the greenest Job Corps Centers to train young people in green and other jobs and will continue to work toward that goal.

The Department of Labor (DOL) is proud of its unique contribution to Federal sustainability: working to increase the number of and train Americans for energy sector and related jobs. Particularly exciting is seeing the sustainability knowledge and sensibility become an integral part of the graduates from the wide variety of job training programs of those 126 Job Corps Centers across the Nation. DOL's contribution to a more sustainable world lies largely in these young people's (ages 16-24) careers and approaches to their lives and careers, and in greening (as best we can) our aged, unsustainable Job Corps building stock in the face of ever tightening budgets. The picture below—like the pictures on the cover and throughout-- captures a great example, at the San Diego Job Corps Center where an electrical instructor and student discuss high energy use old fluorescent T-12 bulb versus new low energy use T-8 bulb.

 

Seth Harris
Acting Secretary for Policy

Charlotte Hayes
Senior Sustainability Officer
Deputy Assistant Secretary for Policy
Office of the Assistant Secretary for
Administration and Management




Executive Summary

Vision

The Department of Labor fosters and promotes the welfare of job seekers, wage earners, and retirees of the United States by improving their working conditions, advancing their opportunities for profitable employment, protecting their retirement and health care benefits, providing workers' compensation, helping employers find workers, strengthening free collective bargaining, and tracking changes in employment, prices, and other national economic measurements.

In carrying out this mission, the Department administers a variety of Federal labor laws including those that guarantee workers' rights to safe and healthful working conditions; a minimum hourly wage and overtime pay; freedom from employment discrimination; unemployment insurance; and other income support. These programs are not involved significantly in substantial greenhouse gas (GHG) emitting production processes. However, the Department believes that it has a significant contribution to make to Federal leadership in environmental energy and economic performance by helping set the standards for federal sustainability, ensuring that its buildings and operations are sustainable and training America's workers, including Job Corps (JC) students, for green jobs.

Leadership

The Department's efforts to meet the goals of Executive Order (E.O.) 13514 are coordinated from the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Administration and Management (OASAM) which provides the Departmental leadership for effective business operations and procurement; performance budgeting; information technology solutions; human resources and civil rights; security and emergency management; environmental sustainability; and long-term planning so that the Department of Labor accomplishes its mission on behalf of America's workers. The Assistant Secretary heads OASAM and reports directly to the Deputy Secretary, who conducts weekly management meetings with the entire senior staff and monthly meetings with each agency within the Department setting, highlighting, and monitoring the performance priorities for the Department to achieve its mission.

Coordination and distribution of the plan to the public and 16,000+ employees across the Nation occurs through the www.dol.gov web site, the LaborNet intranet site which is accessed by all employees, DOL eMag FRANCES, DOL Newsletter (with 120,000 subscribers), Job Corps newsletters (to at least 1,000 Center operators, contractors, etc.) and communiqués from the Secretary from town halls to email. At Job Corps, a new Higher Tier Environmental Management System (EMS) helps to coordinate dissemination of the Job Corps elements of the sustainability plan to all Job Corps Centers, which is combined with individual Job Corps Center-developed templates tailoring the most relevant, effective and best practices to the individual center.

With the senior sustainability officer, environmental, energy, fleet, real property, facility, and contracting management located in OASAM, the leadership and accountability for meeting the E.O. goals is concentrated in the DOL organization that is responsible for these roles on a daily basis. The individuals in these OASAM organizations have performance evaluation standards that include meeting the goals of E.O. 13514. As to the more than 99 percent of DOL's building stock on 125 Job Corps Center campuses, the Job Corps and OASAM teams use its Engineering Support Contractor Information System (ESCIS), a geospatial information system (GIS), to track and assess building energy performance and use, effectively manage buildings and determine renovation and disposal.

OASAM team leadership ensures and supports policy and planning integration from the senior sustainability officer to the property and fleet manager to the contracting operation which supports Job Corps operations.

Performance Review

Sustainability Practice Goals

The Department of Labor has to overcome a key challenge to achieving energy use reduction: 99% of the DOL building portfolio comprises 2,400 buildings at 125 Job Corps Centers (JCC) the average age of which is 40+ years. It is nearly impossible to achieve the goal of at least 15% of such inventory becoming sustainable by 2015, although DOL is still working toward this goal. To maintain progress, DOL's Job Corps (JC) employs many methods to reduce energy use. One important method is ingraining sustainability in the DNA of JC itself, i.e., JCC staff and students in the daily operation of the JCC and in the training for careers. Further, JC embarked on a Sustainability Intensive Initiative which reviews and retro-commissions individual JC buildings to achieve energy efficiency and savings and reduce the greenhouse gas footprint.

Implementation of DOL's sustainability practice goals is summarized below:

Goal 1: Greenhouse Gas Reduction
To help achieve the Scope 1 and 2 greenhouse gas emissions reduction by 27.7% in 2020 from the base year 2008, the Department of Labor is reducing facility energy intensity, installing and using renewable energy, reducing fleet vehicle petroleum use, increasing fleet alternative fuel vehicle (AFV) use, optimizing vehicles' use, right-sizing its fleet, and increasing low emission and high fuel economy vehicle use.

Significantly, DOL's Scope 1&2 emissions have dropped 25.5 percent. This is 7.8% less than GHG emissions in FY 2011 and only 2.2% above DOL's FY 2020 GHG target reduction of 27.7%. DOL's impressive progress on reducing energy intensity is contributing largely to this reduction in Scope 1 and 2 GHGs. The BTUs of energy consumed per building gross square footage was reduced 9.9% from FY 2011 and is presently only 1.9% above DOL's energy reduction target of 30% by FY 2020. Additionally, DOL:

  • Using as many principles as practicable of the Federal High Performance Sustainable Building Checklist, implemented the JCC Sustainability Intensive process at 2 JCCs.
  • Constructed and is operating the Ottumwa and Milwaukee Job Corps Centers, both constructed to the Federal Guiding Principles for High Performance Buildings. The N2 Dormitory at Albuquerque is a LEED Gold Certified building.
  • Purchased renewable energy credits (RECs) to achieve the 5% goal;
  • Completed Web-based training in recycling and water conservation at 50% of the JC sites;
  • Initiated a Web-based (Cloud) energy and water tracking system for Job Corps Centers;
  • Completed EISA Section 432 energy audits at 5 additional Job Corps Centers;
  • Used electric vehicles (EVs) to avoid at least 5 metric tons of greenhouse gases.

Goal 2: Sustainable Buildings
To overcome the challenge presented by the aged Job Corps building stock, all new JC construction is designed to and meets the New Construction Standard of the Federal Guiding Principles for High Performance Buildings. The newest JC projects--New Hampshire, Wind River, Ottumwa, Iowa, and Milwaukee Job Corps Centers--were designed in accordance with this standard. The new Ottumwa Job Corps Center and Milwaukee Job Corps Center received substantial rebates for energy efficient construction. JC facilities have been selected to be showcases for sustainable buildings. The Alaska Job Corps Center has been verified to be operating in accordance with the Existing Buildings Standard of the Federal Guiding Principles for High Performance Buildings.

At existing Job Corps Centers, "Sustainability Intensives" are designed to help meet sustainability goals. Sustainability Intensives assist targeted centers to attain sustainability standards at the lowest possible cost, and involve activities beyond physical facility upgrades. This is a whole-center approach that includes changing the behaviors of building occupants to be mindful of energy and water usage, incorporate green practices and policies, and significantly involve students and staff. Once a center has completed a Sustainability Intensive (and follow-up activities), it is eligible to become a "Center for Environmental Excellence."

With its building inventory loaded into the EPA Energy Star Portfolio Manager system, Job Corps strategies to meet targeted reductions in sustainable buildings are transparent and easily tracked. Currently, Job Corps has planned to meet targeted reductions on a square foot basis. Job Corps has critical issues in meeting the 15% goal of total sustainable buildings in its existing building stock by 2015 due to overall funding issues and construction timing related to annual milestones prior to 2015. Nevertheless, Job Corps has selected entire Centers to meet most of the Guiding Principles based upon the cost and relative ease with which they can be upgraded to the required standards.

Several buildings in Job Corps are already targeted for listing with Energy Star. These buildings will be included in the 15% sustainable buildings requirement. Other buildings will have HVAC systems replaced, enabling them to be commissioned and possibly meet the Energy Consumption Requirements. All new construction projects will meet the Guiding Principles. JC continues to work toward meeting the 15% sustainability goal by 2015 by planning for and using sustainable designs and practices.

Some examples of Job Corps sustainable design and green building efforts are: the new Milwaukee JCC has attractive rain gardens that capture runoff from center roofs and allow stormwater to infiltrate into the ground; the dormitory project at the St. Louis JCC has underground stormwater detention. Further, approximately 90 Job Corps centers are using a Computerized Maintenance Management Program. This program allows maintenance staff to prioritize repairs and respond to occupant work orders, and results in reduced maintenance costs. Also, repair logs are readily available for review to ensure the equipment is adequately maintained, which optimizes equipment efficiency. A facility survey team of engineers and an architect write up building deficiencies. All new deficiencies identified are corrected using energy and water efficiency solutions in accordance with FEMP designated products, ASHRAE 90.1 2007 energy standard, Energy Star, WaterSense, or other appropriate rating system for efficiency.

The Job Corps approach in regional and local planning is to:

  • Create a site selection process that favors areas that will leave a minimal environmental footprint.
  • Favor sites that provide physical connections to the surrounding community.
  • Incorporate participation in regional transportation planning (recognition and use of existing community transportation infrastructure) into existing policy and guidance.
  • Align its policies to increase effectiveness of local energy planning.
  • Incorporate sustainable building location into policy and planning for new Federal facilities and leases.
  • Update agency policy and guidance to ensure that all Environmental Impact Statements and Environmental Assessments required under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) for proposed new or expanded Federal facilities identify and analyze impacts associated with energy usage and alternative energy sources.
  • Update its policy and guidance to ensure coordination and (where appropriate) consultation with Federal, State, Tribal and local management authorities regarding impacts to local ecosystems, watersheds and environmental and management associated with new or expanded Federal facilities.

As a current practice, the Department works closely with local and Tribal authorities for new construction projects in their communities. As applicable, the Department participates in local and regional environmental and sustainability efforts and initiatives.

Goal 3: Fleet Management
DOL's 4,282-vehicle fleet has increased alternative fuel use to comprise 5.5% of its total fuel use and has decreased petroleum use by 15.4% from its FY 2005 baseline. This is an impressive achievement because lack of local AFV infrastructure makes it challenging to meet the AFV fuel increase and conventional fuel reduction targets.

DOL created its own fleet management system, Automobile Use Tracking On-Line System (AUTOS), an online vehicle reporting system that provides accurate and efficient compilation of fleet data and has reduced paperwork and administrative costs. AUTOS has been instrumental to DOL meeting and maintaining statutory requirements and the goals set by Executive Orders and in FY2008 resulted in the Department receiving the White House "Closing the Circle Award" for Leadership in Federal Environmental Stewardship.

Of the 4,282 vehicles in the current DOL fleet, almost 2,170 - more than 50% - are used by the Department's seven worker protection and enforcement agencies. These agencies require vehicles to conduct compliance and enforcement inspections. The need to transport or install specialized equipment in enforcement vehicles, or to deal with variable road terrain conditions, often defines what vehicle models an agency can consider. DOL agencies analyze fleet optimization strategies and options carefully to ensure that vehicle reduction, model downsizing,and conversions from conventional to alternative fuels do not compromise the agency mission.

Goal 4: Water Efficiency and Management
To support water use efficiency and management, Job Corps uses a Web-based utility tracking and monitoring system for all Job Corps Centers. The system's reporting and graphics package has proven to be a valuable tool to analyze utility data and has positively impacted Job Corps conservation initiatives. As an example, the monitoring system tracked results from one Job Corps Center identifying a water usage decrease of 25% from FY2008 to FY2009 as a result of a water line replacement project and installation of tankless water heaters. In addition, Job Corps has:

    • installed low-flow water fixtures in many of its facilities;
    • identified and promoted water reuse strategies consistent with state laws that reduce public water consumption; and
    • begun reducing its infrastructure footprint by planned demolition of older, less water efficient structures at Job Corps Centers.
    • Job Corps uses very little non-potable water for irrigation. The Pinellas Job Corps Center uses municipal-supplied non-potable water for irrigation. Other non-potable water such as storm water and pond water is appropriate for irrigation. Job Corps will reduce nonpotable water use wherever appropriate.

DOL is working hard meet the water reduction goals with:

    • Replacement of steam heating tubes in the headquarter building's hot water converters which has resulted in not only a 34% decrease in water use, but also has decreased steam consumption by over 20%; and,
    • Installation of smaller, more efficient cooling towers at the headquarters building will reduce water consumption and water loss to evaporation and be more energy efficient.
    • Replacement of the Gary JCC water supply piping to prevent leaks.
    • Installation of low-flow showerheads at the Flint/Genesee, Excelsior Springs, North Texas, Grafton and Penobscot JCC.

Goal 5: Pollution Prevention and Waste Reduction
DOL has established recycling programs at DOL sites nationwide and is a national level participant in GSA's recycling program. Additionally, DOL requires the use of recycled content paper for all printing within the Department.

In addition to the DOL overall implementation of methods for waste stream mitigation and reduction, Job Corps has taken the following steps:

  • Several Job Corps Centers have removed trays from food service, which reduces food waste.
  • Integrated pest management and waste tracking and management are core pieces of the Job Corps Center of Environmental Excellence Program. Integrated Pest Management Plans and Waste Management Plans have been implemented at the Alaska, Penobscot, and Flint/Genesee Job Corps Centers.
  • The Red Rock, Flint Hills, Pittsburgh and Oneonta Job Corps Centers compost landscaping waste and some food waste to support vegetable gardens and landscaping. All 23 Job Corps Centers in the San Francisco Region practice composting.

To prevent pollution risks, Job Corps does not exceed Emergency Planning and Community Right to Know Act storage requirements for any chemical.

At the DOL headquarters, the France Perkins Building (FPB), all requests for construction, alteration and repair must now go through a single point for review and approval. Among the items being reviewed and mandated under this process are the requirements for installation of recycled content and recyclable carpet within the building; use of zero-emission volatile organic content paints, and review of the statement of work to ensure that the sorting and recycling of construction and demolition materials are required.

The Department will include clauses in construction contracts to require construction companies to sort construction debris into recyclable products and non-recyclable products and require that all recyclable products generated and construction and demolition (C&D) debris be appropriately recycled. Further, DOL will install composting systems to allow the recycling of biodegradable wastes where practicable. Regarding strategies to reduce municipal solid waste sent to landfills, the Department's is working with GSA to develop a new statement of work for a single stream waste management contract. Using a single stream waste management company to remove solid waste and process and divert recyclable products will reduce the total solid waste sent to landfills. The initial contract will be a pilot that can be expanded across the Department's owned and leased properties in FY2012 and beyond.

Goal 6: Sustainable Acquisition
The DOL Procurement Executive has issued guidance to the Department's contracting officers on the requirements to acquire products and services complying with environmental and sustainability standards, including, but not limited to bio-based, Energy Star and Electronic Product Environmental Assessment Tool (EPEAT) products and products containing recycled content. DOL updates the agency affirmative procurement plans, policies and programs to ensure that all Federally-mandated products and services are included in all relevant acquisitions. In DOL's procurement system, federally-mandated designated sustainable products are built in as the default in all relevant procurements and services. Further, DOL is implementing a new Acquisition Management System (AMS) for procurements, which is being deployed in a commercially hosted cloud based environment and will include the same default settings. DOL deploys contracting officer notices to the contract officer community to remind the community about biobased purchasing requirements. The Department also uses the Federal Strategic Sourcing Initiatives, such as Blanket Purchase Agreements, for office products and imaging equipment which include sustainable requirements. To ensure that DOL tracks purchase card purchases for such products, DOL is revising the DOL purchase card handbook to include sustainable acquisition requirements. DOL will redeploy the revised handbook to the DOL purchase card community. Further, DOL is designing its government purchase card database to review purchase card purchases to ensure that sustainability requirements are met.

DOL requires the purchase of green products and services in the following categories: paper and paper products; vehicles; office products (including electronic equipment); printing services; fleet maintenance products; building construction, renovation and maintenance (including janitorial and landscape); recreational products and services; appliances; lighting; Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) designated products; and EPEAT-registered IT equipment (computers, laptops, and monitors).

Job Corps procurement activities are subject to all Departmental policies, guidance and oversight. Job Corps is making special efforts throughout its centers to enhance its central office and field performance and integrate compliance with statutory, Executive Order, and Department requirements and efforts to facilitate the achievement of the goals and targets.

Goal 7: Electronic Stewardship and Data Centers
The Deputy Secretary issued the "Green IT – Federal Data Center Consolidation Initiative" memo which directs creation of a unified IT infrastructure that aligns the Department with the electronic stewardship and data center goals of E.O. 13514. All agencies within DOL are directed to utilize the DOL enterprise Data Center Consolidation Initiative (DCCI) to satisfy new and existing requirements. The DOL consolidated data center, which is deployed in an externally hosted state of the art commercial facility, became operational in May 2013. The launch was marked by the successful migration of the first agency data center to the new facility. During the multi-year migration period, DOL agencies which continue to maintain and operate dedicated agency data centers are required to comply with the DOL-wide plan for greening DOL.

In support of energy reduction goals, as early as June 2009, DOL initiated policies and strategies to meet the goals, practices and reporting requirements for electronics stewardship in E.O. 13423. These are embodied in a Department-wide effort to: 1) improve the life cycle environmental management of electronic assets, including acquisition, operations, and end-oflife management strategies; 2) measure such improvements; and 3) achieve progress towards sustainable electronics stewardship.

The plan is updated periodically to facilitate the following target Electronics Stewardship Goals:

  1. Acquisition Phase: 95% of computer products purchased are EPEAT-registered;
  2. Use Phase: ENERGY STAR® features are enabled on 100% of computers and monitors, or to the maximum degree based on mission needs; and 100% of agencies/facilities have policies and programs to extend the lifetime of electronic equipment; and
  3. End-of life Phase: 100% of non-usable computers are recycled using environmentally sound management practices.

The Department requires that certified R2 or eSteward electronic recyclers are used to ensure proper recycling.

Goal 8: Renewable Energy
The Department's hero on renewable energy is Job Corps (JC). As the cover photo exemplifies, JC trains students for jobs in renewable energy careers. And, DOL and JC sustainability efforts are boosted through these technologies by installing these solutions on JCCs nationwide. Through these efforts the department meets the E.O. 13514 requirement to increase the use of renewable energy. Further, DOL has exceeded the EPAct 2005 requirement that agencies increase renewable energy use such that 7.5 percent of the agency's total electricity consumption is accounted for by Renewable Energy Credits for FY 2013 and beyond. For FY 2012, the required target was 5 percent of an agency's total electricity consumption. DOL renewable energy use has already clocked in at 7.9%.

Job Corps produces renewable energy with wind turbines at the Pine Ridge, Angell, Cassadaga, Hawaii/Maui, solar photovoltaic production at the Westover, Edison, and Woodland JCCs, and solar hot water at the Miami JCC. The Loring and Albuquerque JCCs produce domestic hot water using biomass.

Goal 9: Climate Change Resilience
The Department has taken the lessons from Hurricane Sandy, which was an extreme weather event affecting the Department's employees, locations and mission, and developed a working group comprised of emergency management representatives, human resources professionals, and policy staff to identify areas of improvement in current departmental emergency response policies and procedures. This working group has been meeting on an almost weekly basis since January. Additionally, continuing coordination and collaboration within the Department's emergency management community has ensured incorporation of new federal planning requirements, best practices and lessons learned from previous extreme weather events (e.g., Hurricane Sandy) into the annual review and updates of regional and agency continuity plans.

Combining these key Department-wide efforts with the Job Corps climate adaptation efforts has inculcated the constant consideration of the climate change risks and vulnerabilities into DOL's day-to-day operation. In addition, JC added climate change considerations into its most recent NEPA process and due diligence environmental review for the proposed use of an undeveloped property adjacent to an Iowa JC site.

In FY 2012, the Department drafted a Climate Adaptation Plan. DOL will evaluate its progress in meeting the Plan goals and will update the Plan as required.




Table 1: Size and Scope of Agency Operations

Agency Size and Scope

FY 2011

FY 2012

Total Number of Employees as Reported in the President's Budget

16,915

16,871

Total Acres of Land Managed

5,825

5,830

Total Number of Facilities Owned

3,518

3,650

Total Number of Buildings Leased (GSA and Non-GSA Lease)

1,292

1,282

Total Buildings Gross Square Feet (GSF)

25,990,887

25,341,410

Operates in Number of Locations Throughout U.S.

653

628

Operates in Number of Locations Outside of U.S.

0

0

Total Number of Fleet Vehicles Owned

123

73

Total Number of Fleet Vehicles Leased

4,300

4,282

Total Number of Exempted-Fleet Vehicles (Tactical, Law Enforcement, Emergency, Etc.)

49

124

Total Amount Contracts Awarded as Reported in FPDS ($Millions)

44.2

41.1

 

Table 1-1: Goal 1 Strategies - Scope 1 & 2 GHG Reductions

(A) Will the agency implement the
following strategies to achieve this
goal?

(B) Top 5?
Yes/No/NA

(C) Strategy Narrative

(D) Specific targets/metrics
to measure strategy
success including milestones
to be achieved in
next 12 months

Use the FEMP GHG emission report to identify/target high emission categories and implement specific actions to resolve high emission areas identified.

No

Not designated as a top strategy for FY 2014

 

Ensure that all major renovations and new building designs are 30% more efficient than applicable code.

Yes

All new Job Corps Centers are built to Guiding Principles.

Completed JCCs are built to Guiding Principles.

Implement in EISA 432 covered facilities all lifecycle cost effective ECMs identified.

Yes

Conduct energy audits of JCCs. Identify ECMs. Determine which ECMs to implement. Implement cost-effective ECMs.

Number of completed energy audits pursuant to EISA 432 by statutory deadline. Review audit recommendations determine if ECMs should be implemented. Number of completed ECMs which are cost effective.

Reduce on-site fossil-fuel consumption by installing more efficient boilers, generators, furnaces, etc. and/or use renewable fuels.

No

Not designated as a top strategy for FY 2014.

 

Reduce grid-supplied electricity consumption by improving/upgrading motors, boilers, HVAC, chillers, compressors, lighting, etc.

No

Not designated as a top strategy for FY 2014.

 

Employ operations and management best practices for energy consuming and emission generating equipment.

No

Not designated as a top strategy for FY 2014.

 

Install building utility meters and benchmark performance to track energy and continuously optimize performance.

Yes

JCCs install building utility meters, track energy use and benchmark performance.

Number of building utility meters installed.

Reduce hours of heating and cooling at DOL headquarters building.

Yes

Reduce hours of heating and cooling at DOL headquarters building.

Track changed energy consumption through utility bills.

Incorporate green building specifications into all new construction and major renovation projects.

Yes

All new JCCs are built to Guiding Principles.

100% completed new JCCs meet Guiding Principles.

 

Table 1-2: Goal 1 Strategies - Scope 3 GHG Reductions

(A) Will the agency implement the
following strategies to achieve this
goal?

(B) Top 5?
Yes/No/NA

(C) Strategy Narrative

(D) Specific targets/metrics
to measure strategy
success including milestones
to be achieved in
next 12 months

Reduce employee business ground travel.

Yes

Re-issue memorandum on video teleconferencing and priority travel decision making.

Track travel costs through budget. Review employee GHG for business ground travel

Reduce employee business air travel.

Yes

Re-issue memorandum on video teleconferencing and priority travel decision making.

Track travel costs through budget. Review employee GHG for business air travel

Develop and deploy employee commuter reduction plan.

No

Not designated as a top strategy for FY 2014.

 

Use employee commuting survey to identify opportunities and strategies for reducing commuter emissions.

No

Not designated as a top strategy for FY 2014.

 

Increase number of employees eligible for telework and/or the total number of days teleworked.

Yes

Re-issue information to employees about teleworking.

Number of days teleworked increases.

Develop and implement bicycle commuter program.

No

Not designated as a top strategy for FY 2014.

 

Provide bicycle commuting infrastructure.

Yes

Build bike infrastructure by adding more bike racks, providing ways for riders to refresh, and advertise benefits to employees.

Add bike racks. Deploy employee advertising campaign for bike program. Partner with GSA and DDOT to provide BikeShare station near DOL.

Examine increase of transit subsidy to promote mass transit use across DOL.

Yes

Review current transit subsidy. Determine if increase in transit subsidy is viable.

Complete examination of increased transit subsidy and implement, if viable.

Incorporate green building specifications into all new construction and major renovation projects.

Yes

All new JCCs are built to Guiding Principles.

100% completed new JCCs meet Guiding Principles.

 




Table 2: Goal 2 Strategies – Sustainable Buildings

(A) Will the agency implement the
following strategies to achieve this
goal?

(B) Top 5?
Yes/No/NA

(C) Strategy Narrative

(D) Specific targets/metrics
to measure strategy
success including milestones
to be achieved in
next 12 months

Incorporate green building specifications into all new construction and major renovation projects.

Yes

All new JCCs are built to Guiding Principles.

100% completed new JCCs meet Guiding Principles.

Redesign or lease interior space to reduce energy use by daylighting, space optimization, sensors/control system installation, etc.

Yes

Redesign interior space to reduce energy use.

Complete implementation of agency space redesign across DOL.Implement new DOL space regulation reducing useable square foot per person to achieve cost and energy reduction.

Deploy CEQ's Implementing Instructions - Sustainable Locations for Federal Facilities.

Yes

Deploy Implementing Instructions to JC.

Implementing Instructions followed in locating facilities at 100% new facilities.

Include in every construction contract all applicable sustainable acquisition requirements for recycled, biobased, energy efficient, and environmentally preferable products.

Yes

Review JC construction contracts to ensure all applicable sustainable acquisition requirements for recycled, biobased, energy efficient, and environmentally preferable products.

95% of JC new construction contracts include all applicable sustainable acquisition requirements for recycled, biobased, energy efficient, and environmentally preferable products.

Develop and deploy energy and sustainability training for all facility and energy managers.

No

Not designated as a top strategy for FY 2014.

 

Reduce heating and cooling hours at DOL headquarters building.

Yes

Reduce hours of heating and cooling at DOL headquarters building.

Track changed energy consumption through utility bills.

 




Table 3: Goal 3 Strategies – Fleet Management

(A) Will the agency implement the
following strategies to achieve this
goal?

(B) Top 5?
Yes/No/NA

(C) Strategy Narrative

(D) Specific targets/metrics
to measure strategy
success including milestones
to be achieved in
next 12 months

Optimize/Rightsize the composition of the fleet (e.g., reduce vehicle size, eliminate underutilized vehicles, acquire and locate vehicles to match local fuel infrastructure).

Yes

Use the DOL AUTOS Fleet Management System to continuously review fleet to determine optimum fleet size and vehicle mix and enforce DOL acquisition policies.

Measure fleet changes through AUTOS.

Reduce miles traveled (e.g., share vehicles, improve routing with telematics, eliminate trips, improve scheduling, use shuttles, etc.).

No

Not designated as a top strategy for FY 2014.

 

Acquire only highly fuel-efficient, low greenhouse gas-emitting vehicles and alternative fuel vehicles (AFVs).

Yes

Require DOL agencies to acquire AFVs where and as much as practicable.

Track AFV acquisitions and measure conformance through AUTOS Fleet Information System.

Increase utilization of alternative fuel in dual-fuel vehicles.

Yes

Re-issue policy that DOL agencies use alternative fuel in DOL vehicles as much as practicable.

Track alternative fuel use in the AUTOS Fleet Information System to measure increase.

Use a Fleet Management Information System to track fuel consumption throughout the year for agencyowned, GSA-leased, and commercially- leased vehicles.

Yes

Track fuel consumption in DOL's AUTOS Fleet Information System. Perform a midyear assessment of fuel use against previous year.

Track petroleum and alternative fuel consumption in the AUTOS Fleet Information System.

Increase GSA leased vehicles and decrease agency-owned fleet vehicles, when cost effective.

Yes

Continue to implement DOL's policy that prefers GSA leased vehicles over agency owned.

Track GSA leased and agency owned vehicles. New agency owned vehicles are fully justified.

 




Table 4: Goal 4 Strategies – Water Use Efficiency & Management

(A) Will the agency implement the
following strategies to achieve this
goal?

(B) Top 5?
Yes/No/NA

(C) Strategy Narrative

(D) Specific targets/metrics
to measure strategy
success including milestones
to be achieved in
next 12 months

Purchase and install water efficient technologies (e.g., Waterwise, lowflow water fixtures and aeration devices).

Yes

JCC install water efficient technologies.

Track number of installations.

Develop and deploy operational controls for leak detection including a distribution system audit, leak detection, and repair programs.

No

Not designated as a top strategy for FY 2014.

 

Design, install, and maintain landscape to reduce water use.

Yes

Install Xeriscape at appropriate JCCs.

Completed installation of Xeriscape at appropriate JCCs.

Design and deploy water closedloop, capture, recharge, and/or reclamation systems.

No

Not designated as a top strategy for FY 2014.

 

Install meters to measure and monitor industrial, landscaping, and agricultural water use.

No

Not designated as a top strategy for FY 2014.

 

Review JCC water use data for annual water use and create plan to address water inefficiency issues.

Yes

Review JCC water use data for increased water use and create plan for addressing issues.

Completed review of JCC water use data and plan to address water inefficiency issues.

Irrigate using cisterns with stormwater.

Yes

Cisterns will be used to collect stormwater and distribute it for irrigation at appropriate JCC locations. Greywater collection will be used for irrigation at appropriate JCC locations.

Completed installation of cisterns and greywater systems where appropriate.

New Construction will use water efficient fixtures.

Yes

Water efficient fixtures and equipment (WaterSense rated or better) will be used in all new construction and renovation.

Verify that JCCs use water efficient fixtures and equipment for new construction and renovation. Verify that applicable projects to address deficiencies include water efficient fixtures and equipment.

 




Table 6: Goal 6 Strategies – Sustainable Acquisition

(A) Will the agency implement the
following strategies to achieve this
goal?

(B) Top 5?
Yes/No/NA

(C) Strategy Narrative

(D) Specific targets/metrics
to measure strategy
success including milestones
to be achieved in
next 12 months

Update and deploy agency procurement policies and programs to ensure that federallymandated designated sustainable products are included in all relevant procurements and services.

Yes

Build federally- mandated designated sustainable product clauses as default in all relevant procurements and services in new AMS procurement system. Issue sustainable acquisition contracting notices to contracting community. Reissue contracting officer notice to contract officers regarding biobased purchasing. Track deviations from system default clauses.

Federally mandated clauses are built into system as default. Sustainable acquisition contracting notices are issued to contracting community. Contracting officer notice to contract officers regarding biobased purchasing are reissued. Deviations from system default clauses are tracked.

Deploy corrective actions to address identified barriers to increasing sustainable procurements with special emphasis on biobased purchasing.

Yes

Build federally- mandated designated sustainable product clauses as default in all relevant procurements and services in new AMS procurement system deployment. Reissue contracting officer notice to contract officers regarding biobased purchasing. Remind DOL acquisition community about biobased purchasing requirements quarterly.

Deviation from system default clauses are tracked. Contracting officer notice to contract officers regarding biobased purchasing is reissued. DOL acquisition community is reminded quarterly about biobased purchasing requirements.

Include biobased and other FAR sustainability clauses in all applicable construction and other relevant service contracts.

Yes

Build federally- mandated designated sustainable products as default in all relevant procurements and services in new AMS procurement system deployment. Reissue contracting officer notice to contract officers regarding biobased purchasing. Remind DOL acquisition community about biobased purchasing requirements quarterly.

Deviation from system default clauses are tracked. Contracting officer notice to contract officers regarding biobased purchasing is reissued. DOL acquisition community is reminded quarterly about biobased purchasing requirements.

Review and update agency specifications to include and encourage biobased and other designated green products to enable meeting sustainable acquisition goals.

NA

DOL is not the owner of federal purchasing specifications.

 

Use Federal Strategic Sourcing Initiatives, such as Blanket Purchase Agreements (BPAs) for office products and imaging equipment, which include sustainable acquisition requirements.

Yes

Use GSA FSSI procurement vehicles for office products and imaging equipment which include sustainable requirements. Revise DOL purchase card handbook to include sustainable acquisition requirements and distribute to purchase card community.

Revised handbook is distributed to the purchase card community.

Report on sustainability compliance in contractor performance reviews.

No

Not designated as a top strategy for FY 2014.

 

Ensure acquisition of 95% EPEAT registered and 100% of ENERGY STAR qualified and FEMP designated electronic office products.

Yes

Purchase recyclable and recycled furnishings for DOL space renovation and redesign.

Track purchasing through procurement systems.

 




Table 7: Goal 7 Strategies – Electronic Stewardship & Data Centers

(A) Will the agency implement the
following strategies to achieve this
goal?

(B) Top 5?
Yes/No/NA

(C) Strategy Narrative

(D) Specific targets/metrics
to measure strategy
success including milestones
to be achieved in
next 12 months

Identify agency "Core" and "Non- Core" Data Centers.

Yes

Identify agency "Core" and "Non-Core" Data. Assess agency Core and Non-Core data as systems are refreshed to cloud solutions or migrated as a part of FDCCI.

Complete Core/Non-Core classifications for all DOL data centers. Review designations for accuracy semi-annually or as required by FDCCI.

Consolidate 40% of agency Non- Core Data Centers.

No

Not designated as a top strategy for FY 2014.

 

Optimize agency Core Data Centers across total cost of ownership metrics.

Yes

Optimize agency Core Data Centers across total cost of ownership metrics.

Consolidate 3 agency facilities to the DOL enterprise data center. Complete periodic FDCCI reporting requirements in FY14.

Ensure that power management, duplex printing, and other energy efficiency or environmentally preferable options and features are enabled on all eligible electronics and monitor compliance.

Yes

Review printers to ensure that duplex printing function is enabled. Require that duplex setting is activated in new printers.

Assess policy implementation in FY 2014.

Update and deploy policies to use environmentally sound practices for disposition of all agency excess or surplus electronic products, including use of certified eSteward and/or R2 electronic recyclers, and monitor compliance.

Yes

Review policies for disposal of agency excess or surplus electronic products and update to ensure environmentally sound practices are used including the use of certified eSteward and/or R2 electronic recyclers.

Completed review of policies. Complete update of policies where appropriate and redeploy

Ensure acquisition of 95% EPEAT registered and 100% of ENERGY STAR qualified and FEMP designated electronic office products.

Yes

Acquire EPEAT registered and ENERGY STAR qualified and FEMP designated electronic office products.

Track designated electronic office products through procurement systems to ensure that 95% are EPEAT registered and 100% are ENERGY STAR qualified and FEMP designated.

 




Table 8: Goal 8 Strategies – Renewable Energy

(A) Will the agency implement the
following strategies to achieve this
goal?

(B) Top 5?
Yes/No/NA

(C) Strategy Narrative

(D) Specific targets/metrics
to measure strategy
success including milestones
to be achieved in
next 12 months

Purchase renewable energy directly or through Renewable Energy Credits (RECs).

Yes

JC will purchase RECs where appropriate.

Track JC REC purchases where appropriate.

Install onsite renewable energy on federal sites.

Yes

JC will install onsite renewable energy where appropriate.

Track onsite renewable energy installation.

Lease land for renewable energy infrastructure.

No

Not designated as a top strategy for FY 2014.

 

Develop biomass capacity for energy generation.

No

Not designated as a top strategy for FY 2014.

 

Utilize performance contracting methodologies for implementing ECMs and increasing renewable energy.

No

Not designated as a top strategy for FY 2014.

 

Work with other agencies to create volume discount incentives for increased renewable energy purchases.

Yes

Purchase renewable energy from GSA.

Renewable energy is purchased from GSA.

Train JC students to install solar panels and other renewable energy.

Yes

Train JC students to install solar panels and other renewable energy.

Track JC training on renewable energy.

Install geothermal energy.

Yes

Install geothermal at appropriate JCCs.

Track geothermal installation.

 




Table 9: Goal 9 Strategies – Climate Change Resilience

(A) Will the agency implement the
following strategies to achieve this
goal?

(B) Top 5?
Yes/No/NA

(C) Strategy Narrative

(D) Specific targets/metrics
to measure strategy
success including milestones
to be achieved in
next 12 months

Ensure climate change adaptation is integrated into both agency-wide and regional planning efforts, in coordination with other Federal agencies as well as state and local partners, Tribal governments, and private stakeholders.

No

Not designated as a top strategy for FY 2014.

 

Update agency emergency response procedures and protocols to account for projected climate change, including extreme weather events.

Yes

Integrate preparation for climate change extreme weather events into agency emergency response protocols. Establish working group to address necessary updates to departmental emergency response policies and procedures. Review and update human resources emergency procedures and protocols in DOL Continuity Plan. Review and update regional continuity plans. Update and publish revised DOL policy on Emergency Management. Develop formal departmental policies for employee accountability in preparation and response to emergencies. Review and update agency continuity plans. Develop formal departmental policies for emergency designation of emergency response and support employees.

Working group is established. Complete review and update human resources emergency procedures and protocols. Completed review and update of regional continuity plans. Completed update and publishing of revised DOL policy on emergency management. Completed departmental policies for employee accountability for emergencies. Completed review and update of agency continuity plans. Completed departmental policies for emergency designation emergency response and support employees.

Ensure workforce protocols and policies reflect projected human health and safety impacts of climate change.

Yes

Ensure workforce protocols and policies reflect projected human health and safety impacts of climate change.

OSHA reviews DOL climate adaptation plan, e.g., to ensure mission execution includes such efforts as "heat campaign" which take address climate adaptation.

Update agency external programs and policies (including grants, loans, technical assistance, etc.) to incentivize planning for, and addressing the impacts of, climate change.

No

Not designated as a top strategy for FY 2014.

 

Ensure agency principals demonstrate commitment to adaptation efforts through internal communications and policies.

No

Not designated as a top strategy for FY 2014.

 

Identify vulnerable communities that are served by agency mission and are potentially impacted by climate change and identify measures to address those vulnerabilities where possible.

No

Not designated as a top strategy for FY 2014.

 

Ensure that agency climate adaptation and resilience policies and programs reflect best available current climate change science, updated as necessary

Yes

Update DOL Climate Adaptation Plan reflect the best available current science.

Completed updated Plan.

Design and construct new or modify/manage existing agency facilities and/or infrastructure to account for the potential impacts of projected climate change.

Yes

Incorporate climate change considerations into the NEPA review of new facilities and major renovations. Design and construct new or modify existing agency facilities and/or infrastructure to account for the potential impacts of projected climate change.

Completed NEPA review and construction incorporates climate change considerations.

Incorporate climate preparedness and resilience into planning and implementation guidelines for agency-implemented projects.

Yes

Incorporate climate resilience considerations in NEPA assessments.

Review NEPA assessments.

 




Goal 1: Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Reduction

Agency Progress toward Scope 1 & 2 GHG Goals

 

Metric Tons of CO2e

2008 Baseline

297, 691

2010

287,769 (-3.3%)

2011

244, 940 (-17.7%)

2012

221,755 (-25.5%)

2020 Target

215,231 (-27.7%)

Agency Progress toward Scope 1 & 2 GHG Goals

E.O. 13514 requires each agency establish a Scope 1 & 2 GHG emission reduction target to be achieved by FY 2020. The red bar represents the agency's FY 2008 baseline. The green bar represents the FY 2020 target reduction. The blue bars represent annual agency progress towards achieving this target. The percentage at the top of each bar represents the reduction or increase from the FY 2008 baseline. A negative percentage value indicates that the emissions have decreased compared to the 2008 baseline.

 

Agency Progress towards Scope 3 GHG Goal

 

Metric Tons of CO2e

2008 Baseline

98,132

2010

85,639 (-12.7%)

2011

73,597 (-25.0%)

2012

66,834 (-31.9%)

2020 Target

75,169 (-23.4%)

Agency Progress towards Scope 3 GHG Goal

E.O. 13514 requires each agency establish a Scope 3 GHG emission reduction target to be achieved by FY 2020. The red bar represents the agency's FY 2008 baseline. The green bar represents the FY 2020 reduction target. The blue bars represent annual agency progress on achieving this target. The percentage at the top of each bar represents the reduction or increase from the FY 2008 baseline. A negative percentage value indicates that the emissions have been decreased compared to the FY 2008 baseline.

 




Goal 2: Sustainable Buildings

Agency Progress toward Facility Energy Intensity Reduction Goals

 

Btu per Gross Square Foot

2003 Baseline

118,769

2010

95,955 (-19.2%)

2011

97,164 (-18.2)

2012

85,369 (-28.1%)

2015 Target

83,138 (-30.0%)

Agency Progress toward Facility Energy Intensity Reduction Goal

E.O. 13514 Section 2 requires that agencies consider building energy intensity reductions. Further, the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA) requires each agency to reduce energy intensity 30 percent by FY 2015 as compared to the FY 2003 baseline. Agencies are expected to reduce energy intensity by 3 percent annually to meet the goal. The red bar represents the agency's FY 2003 baseline. The green bar represents the FY 2015 target reduction. The blue bars show annual agency progress on achieving this target. The percentage at the top of each bar represents the reduction or increase from the FY 2003 baseline. A negative percentage value indicates that the energy intensity has been decreased compared to the FY 2003 baseline.

 

Agency Progress toward Total Buildings Meeting the Guiding Principles

 

Percentage of Total Buildings Meeting the Guiding Principles

2010

0.01%

2011

1.4%

2012

0.01%

2015 Target

15.0%

Agency Progress toward Total Buildings Meeting the Guiding Principles

E.O. 13514 requires that by FY 2015, 15 percent of agencies' new, existing, and leased buildings greater than 5,000 square feet meet the Guiding Principles. In order to meet the FY 2015 goal, agencies should have increased the percentage of conforming buildings by approximately 2 percent annually from their FY 2007 baseline. The green bar represents the FY 2015 target. The blue bars represent annual agency progress on achieving this target.

 




Goal 3: Fleet Management

Agency Progress toward Fleet Petroleum Use Reduction Goal

 

Gallons Gasoline Equivalent (thous.)

2005 Baseline

3,318

2010

2,967 (-10.6%)

2011

2,911 (-12.3%)

2012

2,806 (-15.4%)

2015 Target

2,655 (-20.0%)

2020 Target

2,323 (-30.0%)

Agency Progress toward Fleet Petroleum Use Reduction Goal

E.O. 13514 and the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA) require that by FY 2015 agencies reduce fleet petroleum use by 20 percent compared to a FY 2005 baseline. Agencies are expected to achieve at least a 2 percent annual reduction and a 30 percent reduction is required by FY 2020. The red bar represents the agency's FY 2005 baseline. The green bars represent the FY 2015 and FY 2020 target reductions. The blue bars represent annual agency progress on achieving these targets. The percentage at the top of each bar represents the reduction or increase from the FY 2005

 

Agency Progress toward Fleet Alternative Fuel Consumption Goal

 

Gallons Gasoline Equivalent

2005 Baseline

54,185

2010

59,007 (8.9%)

2011

177,082 (226.8%)

2012

163,845 (202.4%)
Represents 5.5% of Total Fleet Fuel Use

2015 Target

140,542 (159.4%)

Agency Progress toward Fleet Alternative Fuel Consumption Goal

E.O. 13423 requires that agencies increase total alternative fuel consumption by 10 percent annually from the prior year starting in FY 2005. By FY 2015, agencies must increase alternative fuel use by 159.4 percent, relative to FY 2005. The red bar represents the agency's FY 2005 baseline. The green bar represents the FY 2015 target. The blue bars represent annual agency progress on achieving this target. The percentage at the top of each bar represents the reduction or increase from the FY 2005 baseline. A negative percentage indicates a decrease in fleet alternative fuel use.




Goal 4: Water Use Efficiency & Management

Agency Progress toward Potable Water Intensity Reduction Goal

 

Gallons per Gross Square Foot

2007 Baseline

48.1

2010

47.8 (-0.6%)

2011

44.2 (-8.1%)

2012

45.0 (-6.6%)

2015 Target

40.4 (-16.0)

2020 Target

35.6 (-26.0%)

Agency Progress toward Potable Water Intensity Reduction Goal

E.O. 13514 requires agencies to reduce potable water intensity by 2 percent annually through FY 2020 compared to an FY 2007 baseline. A 16 percent reduction is required by FY 2015 and a 26 percent reduction is required by FY 2020. The red bar represents the agency's FY 2007 baseline. The green bars represent the FY 2015 and FY 2020 target reductions. The blue bars represent annual agency progress on achieving these targets. The percentage at the top of each bar represents the reduction or increase from the FY 2007 baseline. A negative percentage value indicates that portable water use intensity has decreased compared to the FY 2007 baseline.




Goal 5: Pollution Prevention & Waste Reduction

Agency Progress toward Pollution Prevention & Waste Reduction

E.O. 13514 requires that Federal agencies promote pollution prevention and eliminate waste. The E.O. requires agencies to minimize the use of toxic and hazardous chemicals and pursue acceptable alternatives. It also requires agencies minimize waste generation through source reduction, increase diversion of compostable materials, and by the end of FY 2015 divert at least 50% of non-hazardous and 50% of construction and demolition debris.

(A) Will the agency implement the
following strategies to achieve this
goal?

(B) Top 5?
Yes/No/NA

(C) Strategy Narrative

(D) Specific targets/metrics
to measure strategy
success including milestones
to be achieved in
next 12 months

Eliminate, reduce, or recover refrigerants and other fugitive emissions.

No

Not designated as a top strategy for FY 2014.

 

Reduce waste generation through elimination, source reduction, and recycling.

Yes

Review recycling program.

Completed review of recycling program. Completed guidance for recycling and waste diversion tracking.

Implement integrated pest management and improved landscape management practices to reduce and eliminate the use of toxic and hazardous chemicals/materials.

Yes

Review DOL headquarter pest management contractor and eliminate use of toxic and hazardous chemicals and materials.

Completed review of DOL headquarter pest management contractor and eliminate use of toxic and hazardous chemicals and materials.

Establish a tracking and reporting system for construction and demolition debris elimination.

No

Not designated as a top strategy for FY 2014.

 

Purchase 3% post-consumer paper.

Yes

Purchase 3% post-consumer paper.

Track purchases.

Develop/revise Agency Chemicals Inventory Plans and identify and de- ploy chemical elimination, substitution, and/or management opportunities.

No

Not designated as a top strategy for FY 2014.

 

Purchase recyclable and recycled furnishings for DOL space renovation and redesign.

Yes

Purchase recyclable and recycled furnishings for DOL space renovation and redesign.

Track purchases.

Ensure printers are duplex printing enabled.

Yes

Review printers to ensure that duplex printing function is enabled. Require that duplex setting is activated in new printers.

Completed review of printers to ensure that printers are duplex printing enabled.

 




Goal 6: Sustainable Acquisition

Agency Progress toward Sustainable Acquisition Goal

 

Percent of Applicable Contracts Containing Sustainable Acquisition Requirements

1st Quarter

100%

2nd Quarter

100%

3rd Quarter

100%

4th Quarter

100%

FY 2012

Agency Progress toward Sustainable Acquisition Goal

E.O. 13514 requires agencies to advance sustainable acquisition and ensure that 95 percent of applicable new contract actions meet federal mandates for acquiring products that are energy efficient, water efficient, biobased, environmentally preferable, non-ozone depleting, recycled content, or are non-toxic or less toxic alternatives, where these products meet performance requirements. To monitor performance, agencies perform quarterly reviews of at least 5 percent of applicable new contract actions to determine if sustainable acquisition requirements are included.

 

Total # FPDS Reported Applicable Contract Actions

1,486 (100%)

Total # FPDS Reported Contract Actions that include Biopreferred Requirements

5 (0.34%)

Federal Procurement Data System Standard Reports on Biopreferred Procurement Actions

Progress Toward Water Intensity Reduction Goals

The Federal Procurement Data System (FPDS) is used by federal agencies to record and manage contract actions. On the pie chart below, the blue area represents the total number of contract actions reported by the agency in FPDS in FY 2012 that are "applicable" to the sustainable procurement requirements. Applicable contract actions are new domestic contracts, task and delivery orders, excluding weapons systems and those actions that are unlikely to use biobased products (e.g., research and social development contracts, education and training, social services, and the lease or rental of equipment). The green area represents the total number of applicable contract actions that the agency reported in FPDS as containing biobased product requirements.

 




Goal 7: Electronic Stewardship & Data Centers

Agency Progress toward EPEAT, Power Management & End of Life Goals

E.O. 13514 requires agencies to promote electronics stewardship by: ensuring procurement preference for EPEAT-registered products; implementing policies to enable power management, duplex printing, and other energy-efficient features; employing environmentally sound practices with respect to the disposition of electronic products; procuring Energy Star and FEMP designated electronics; and, implementing best management practices for data center operations.

EPEAT

Power Management

End-of-Life

Comments

green dot

green dot

green dot

 


EPEAT:

green dot

95% or more Monitors and PCs/Laptops purchased in FY2012 was EPEAT Compliant Agency-wide

yellow dot

85-94% or more Monitors and PCs/Laptops purchased in FY2012 was EPEAT Compliant Agency-wide

red dot

84% or less Monitors and PCs/Laptops purchased in FY2012 was EPEAT Compliant Agency-wide


Power Management:

green dot

100% Power Management Enabled Computers, Laptops and Monitors Agency-wide

yellow dot

90-99% Power Management Enabled Computers, Laptops and Monitors Agencywide

red dot

89% or less Power Management Enabled Computers, Laptops and Monitors Agency-wide


End-of-Life:

green dot

100% of Electronics at end-of-life disposed through GSA Xcess, CFL, Unicor or Certified Recycler (R2, E-Stewards)

yellow dot

100% of Electronics at end-of-life disposed through GSA Xcess, CFL, Unicor and/or non-Certified Recycler

red dot

Less than 100% of Electronics at end-of-life disposed through GSA Xcess, CFL, Unicor or non-Certified Recycler


 




Renewable Energy (MWh)

22,372 (7.9%)

Total Non - RE (MWh)

260,684 (92.1%)

Goal 8: Renewable Energy

Agency Renewable Energy Percentage of Total Electricity Usage

Progress Toward Water Intensity Reduction Goals

E.O. 13514 requires that agencies increase use of renewable energy. Further, EPACT 2005 requires agencies to increase renewable energy use such that 7.5 percent of the agency's total electricity consumption is generated by renewable energy sources for FY 2013 and beyond. For FY 2012, the required target was 5 percent of an agency's total electricity consumption.




Goal 9: Climate Change Resilience

Agency Climate Change Resilience

E.O. 13514 requires each agency to evaluate agency climate change risks and vulnerabilities to identify and manage the effects of climate change on the agency's operations and mission in both the short and long term.