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Secretary of Labor Thomas E. Perez
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News Release

OSHA News Release: [06/24/2013]
Contact Name: Adriano Llosa or Jesse Lawder
Phone Number: (202) 693-4686 or x4659
Email:
Llosa.Adriano.t@dol.gov or Lawder.Jesse@dol.gov
Release Number: 13-1249-NAT

OSHA urges increased safety awareness in fireworks industry in advance of July 4 celebrations

WASHINGTON — The Occupational Safety and Health Administration is urging the fireworks and pyrotechnics industry to be vigilant in protecting workers from hazards while manufacturing, storing, transporting, displaying and selling fireworks for public events.

"As we look forward to July 4 celebrations with fireworks and festivities, we must also consider the safety of workers who handle pyrotechnics," said Assistant Secretary of Labor for Occupational Safety and Health Dr. David Michaels. "Employers are responsible for keeping everyone safe on the job and taking appropriate measures to protect workers from serious injuries or death."

In March 2012, three workers suffered serious burns caused by an explosion at Global Pyrotechnic Solutions Inc. OSHA cited the Dittmer, Mo., company nearly $117,000 for safety violations relating to explosive hazards.

OSHA's pyrotechnics directive, Compliance Policy for Manufacture, Storage, Sale, Handling, Use and Display of Pyrotechnics, provides inspection guidance and OSHA requirements as they apply to pyrotechnics facilities and operations. The directive is available at http://www.osha.gov/OshDoc/Directive_pdf/CPL_02-01-053.pdf.

OSHA's Web page on the pyrotechnics industry addresses retail sales of fireworks and fireworks displays. Information on common hazards and solutions found in both areas of the industry, and downloadable safety posters for workplaces are available at http://www.osha.gov/SLTC/pyrotechnic/index.html. It also includes a video, available at http://www.osha.gov/video/fireworks/index.html, which demonstrates best industry practices for retail sales and manufacturers based on National Fire Protection Association consensus standards.

Under the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970, employers are responsible for providing safe and healthful workplaces for their employees. OSHA's role is to ensure these conditions for America's working men and women by setting and enforcing standards, and providing training, education and assistance. For more information, visit www.osha.gov.