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William Green

A selected bibliography of materials in the Wirtz Labor Library Collection

William Green (1870-1952) served as President of the American Federation of Labor from 1924 to 1952 through some of the most tumultuous times in American history. He was born in Coshocton, Ohio and died there at the age of 79. He developed an interest in labor issues early in life after leaving school to work in the coal mines.

Green was a profilic speaker and writer. For more than 28 years he served as editor of the American Federation of Labor publication, American Federationist. His differences with John L. Lewis over craft unionism vs. industrial unionism led to a split in the American Federation of Labor and spurred the formation of the Congress of Industrial Organizations by Lewis. Many of Green’s positions on issues such as the five-day work week and the six-hour a day were controversial but had a lasting impact on the lives of working men and women.

William Green was inducted into the Labor Hall of Fame (now Labor Hall of Honor) at the U.S.Department of Labor in 1996, honored for his life-long contributions to American labor.

The following bibliography contains references to materials in the Wirtz Labor Library. These works include books, articles, addresses, and Congressional testimony. The dates span the 1920s to the 1940s.

This bibliography is organized in three main sections: Biographical materials, materials authored by William Green, and his Congressional testimony.

William Green Biography

HD8074.M4 1937
Minton, Bruce and Stuart
Men Who Lead Labor
Modern Age Books. New York. 1937. pp. 3-29.
A chapter in a book which contains leading men in the labor field.

Madison, James
American Labor Leaders
Frederick Unger Publishing Co. 1962. pp. 108-135.
A short biography of William Green.

HD8073.G74 D36 1952
Danish, Max. D
William Green a Pictorial biography
Inter-Allied Publications. New York. 1952.
This brief biographical sketch is filled with pictures that capture some of the moments in the labor leader’s life and times.

Speeches, Addresses and Statements by William Green

William Green
"Labor's Demand's in Social Security." In Social Security
American Association for Social Security, Inc. New York. April 1927. pp. 178-182.
Mr. Green's statement on the postion that the administration of any social security plan could best be served through one agency instead of several. Green also called for the subsidy system to be strengthened.

Green, William
“Labor’s part in the alleviation of unemployment.” In the Unemployment Industry Seeks a Solution compiled by the President’s Emergency Committee for Employment.
U.S. Government Printing Office. Washington, D.C. 1931. pp. 23-27. A radio address given under the auspices of the President’s Emergency Committee for Employment.

Green, William
“More about Brookwood College.”
Statement as President of the American Federation of Labor.

Green, William
In The Economics of Collective Bargaining. Charlotte Knight, ed.
Regents of the University of California. 1950. pp. 88-97.
Part of a series of public lectures held in Berkeley and Los Angeles under the auspices of the Institute of Industrial Relations.

Green, William
“Unemployment during the World Depression.”
The World Today.
Special supplement to the Encyclopaedia Britannica. USA. Vol. 1, No. 1, October, 1933. pp. 37-41.
An article written to be included in the special supplement to the Britannica.

Green, William
An introduction address made at the Conference for Elimination of Waste in Industry.
Central Labor Union and Labor College. Philadelphia. April 9 and 10, 1927.

Green, William
We work for the Future.
American Federation of Labor. (A.F.of L.) Washington, D.C., 1941.

Green, William.
“The goals of organized Labor.” The American Academy of Political and Social Science
Philadelphia. 1936. pp. 147-153.

Green, William.
“Time is on the side of facts.”
General Federation of Women’s clubs. Official Report, 18th Biennial Convention, Atlantic City, N.J., May 22- June 5, 1926. pp. 97-101.

LB1044.5 .N42 no.1
Green, William.
“Labor’s contribution to American civilization.”
National Advisory Council on Radio in Education. Labor Series lecture No.1. May 1, 1932 delivered over Columbia Broadcasting Company radio station. University of Chicago Press. Chicago.

HD6508 .G78 1939
Green, William.
Labor and Democracy
Princeton University Press. Princeton, N.J., 1939.

Green, William.
“The Science of Labor Relations.” American Federationist. A.F. of L., Washington, D.C. March 1938.
Address to the officers and members of the University of Wisconsin Alumni Association. Madison, WI. February 12, 1938.

Green, William.
Labor and National Defense. Rotary Club of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Philadelphia. April 2, 1941.

HD6511 .A6 1952
Green, William.
A Democratic Institution. A.F. of L. Washington, D.C. October 1, 1952.

Green, William
The Superiority of Trade Unions Over Company “Unions.” A. F. of L. Washington, D.C. April 13, 1926.

HD5650 .G7
Green, William
"Company Unions." American Federationist.
A. F. of L. 1926.
A statement on the differences between company unions and outside unions.

Green, William, Frank Duffy and Matthew Woll.
Standards for Compensation Legislation: Data and Comment. A.F. of L. Washington, D.C. 1925.

Jewish Labor Committee.
A Tribute to William Green
Jewish Labor Committee. New York, 1951.
A bust was dedicated to William Green and tributes given for his long work in the labor field. The tribute was broadcast over the radio.

Green, William
Social Obligations of Business Industry and Labor.
A. F. of L. Washington, D.C. 1931.
In this statement, Mr. Green espouses some of his favorite causes such as the five-day work week and emphasizes the contributions of trade unions to the quality of life of the workers.

HD651 .G7 1930
Green, William
Labor proposes cooperation.
A. F. of L. Washington, D.C. 1930. Address made in Danville, Virginia. June 1930.

Green, William
Wage Theories.
A.F. of L., Washington, DC. 1926. Address at Princeton University, February 26, 1926.
A short treatise on wage theories and economics.

Green, William
Labor Seeks Life More Abundantly.
A. F. of L. Washington, D.C. September 1926.
Address at the Cathedral of St. John the Divine, New York, September 6, 1925.

Green, William
Modern Trade Unionism.
A. F. of L. Washington, D.C. 1925.
An address before the Harvard Union. Mr. Green discusses the balance that is necessary between labor and industry.

Green, William
The Right to Work.
A. F. of L. Washington, D.C. 1931.
This is the opening address of Mr. Green before the 1931 convention of the A.F. of L. held in British Columbia.

Green, William
Problems of Railroad Workers.
A. F. of L. Washington, D.C. 1930.
An address delivered before the Eighth Convention of the Railway Employees’ Department of the A. F. of L. Chicago. April 30, 1930.

Green, William
Unions Reduce Industrial Waste.
A.F. of L. Washington, D.C. 1925.
An address made in a round table discussion of industrial waste, April 11, 1925.

Green, William
Minimum Wage.
A. F. of L. Washington, D.C. 1915.
In debate at the annual dinner of the National Retail Dry Goods Association, New York, February 10, 1915.

Green, William
Address to the National Press Club, Washington, D.C. July 1936.
In this address, Mr. Green tells the National Press Club that A.F. of L. policies formed in conventions are the laws that affiliated organizations must follow.

Green, William
Address to the Maryland State and District of Columbia Federations of Labor. 32nd Annual Convention. A.F. of L. Hagerstown, Maryland. May 1937. Remarks made by Mr. Green concerning the difficulties between the A.F. of L. and the Congress of Industrial Organizations. He was apparently supported by the Maryland group in this dispute.

HD7819.U5 G79
Green, William
“Labor and Injunctions.”
A. F. of L. Washington, D.C. May 25, 1927.
Address delivered under auspices of the National Civic Foundation, New York City.

Green, William
“The Five day week inevitable.”
A. F. of L.. Washington, D.C. 1932.
Reprint of an article originally published in the New York Times, August 28, 1931.

Green, William
Profit Sharing.
A.F. of L. Washington, D.C. 1938.
A copy of a statement made to the Subcommittee of the Senate Finance Committee, November 23, 1938.

HD6486 .G8
Green, William
Analysis of Statements Contained in Vinson Committee’s Report Regarding Union Finances.
A.F. of L. Washington, D.C. 1942.

Green, William
The Union and Human Freedom: The Miners Electric Railways.
A.F. of L. Washington, D.C. 1927.

Green, William
“If I were an Industrial Manager.”
National Association of Manufacturers (NAM). New York. Dec. 6, 1944.
An address to the 49th Annual meeting of the NAM.

Green, William
“Labor.” In A Century of Progress. Beard, Charles,ed.
Harper & Brothers Publishers. New York. 1933. pp. 148-170.
Green's contribution is one of authors summarizing outstanding events and achievements in their respective fields.

Green, William
The Thirty Hour Week.
A.F. of L. Washington, D.C. 1935.
A proposal made by William Green on the behalf of organized labor in order to aid in the economic recovery of America.

Green, William
“Wage Freezing Uncalled for: Ceilings on Wages.”The Reference Shelf. Johnson, Julia, comp.
New York, 1943. pp. 117-121. Originally printed in Rotarian, 60:17. January 1942, pp. 55-6.

HD5109 .G7
Green, William
The Five Day Week.
A.F. of L. Washington, D.C. 1926?. Reprinted from the North America Review.
Impassioned statement in favor of the five-day work week.

Green, William
Address at the 33rd Constitutional Convention of the United Mine Workers of America.
Washington, D.C. 1936.
This address contained pointed criticisms of the CIO.

Green, William
"Labor". In the Congress of American Industry: Discussions by Leading Authorites.
Congress of American Industry. Philadelphia. September 7-27, 1926.
A speech given to the Congress on the subject of organized labor.

Green, William A.F. of L. Washington, D.C. April 1944.
A statement before th Post-War Policy and Planning Committee. Mr. Green gives suggestions on speeding conversion from war-time production to post-war production.

HD7819.U5 I5 1928
Oliphant, Herman
Interborough Rapid Transit Company against William Green, et. al, brief for defendant.
Workers Education Bureau Press. New York, 1928.
A foreword by William Green.

Congressional Testimony and Statements of William Green

U.S. Congress. Senate. Subcommittee of the Committee on Education and Labor. Conciliation Act of 1941. 77th Congress. First session on S. 683. May, 1941. pp. 114-132.
A statement by William Green concerning S. 683, on behalf of the American Federation of Labor.

U.S. Congress. Senate. Committee on Education and Labor. Unemployment in the United States. 70th Congress. 2nd Session pursuant to S. Res. 219. Dec. 1929. pp. 53-68.
This statement by Mr. Green to the subcommittee, largely discusses the problem of unemployment due to the replacement of workers by machines.

U.S. Congress. House of Representatives. Committee on Labor. Thirty-Hour Week Bill. 73rd Congress. First Session on S. 158 and H.R. 4557. April-May 1933, pg. 61-90.
A formal statement by Mr. Green on the behalf of the A.F. of L. in support of the 5 day, 6 hour workweek bill. Questioning by the committee followed the statement.

HC106.4 .A644
U.S. Congress. House of Representatives. Post-War Economic Policy and Planning Committee. Statement before Committee, Washington, D.C. April 17, 1944.

U.S. Congress. Senate. Committee on Labor and Public Welfare. 80th Congress. First Session. Statement by William Green, President of the American Federation of Labor. Washington, D.C., 1947.

U.S. Congress. Senate. Committee on Education and Labor. Washington, U.S. Government Printing Office, 1942.
Statement of William Green, President, the American Federation of Labor: vol.1, pp.132-141.

U.S. Congress. Senate. Special Committee Investigating the National Defense Program. Washington, D.C., U.S. Government Printing Office, 1943.
Testimony of William Green, President, American Federation of Labor: pp.7304-7328.

U.S. Congress. Senate. Subcommittee of the Committee on Commerce. Unemployment in the United States. 71st Congress, 2nd session. , March-April 1930. Statement of William Green, President, A.F. of L.

U.S. Congress. Senate. Committee on Banking and Currency. National Stabilization. 80th Congress. 2nd session on S 1873, S 1888, S 1967 and S 2023. January 1948. pg.301-332.
Testimony before the Committee given on behalf of the National Grain Trade Council.

U.S. Congress. Senate. Committee on Education and Labor. National Labor Relations Board. 74th Congress. 1st session on S. 1958. March 1935. pg.101-123.
Statement by Mr. Green to support the Wagner National Labor Relations Act.

U.S. Congress. House of Representatives. Committee on Labor. Labor Disputes Act. 74th Congress. 1st session on H.R. 6288. March -April 1935. pp. 197-242.

U.S. Congress. Senate. Committee on Finance. Economic Security Act. 74th Congress. 1st session on S. 1130. January 1935. pp. 141-186.
Testimony given before the committee in support of the social security bill.

U.S. Congress. House. Select Committee Investigating National Defense Migration. 77th Congress. 2nd Session. Pursuant to H.R. 113. February 1942, part 28. pp.10931-10935.
A brief statement by Green on converting manpower from war-time to post-war producation.