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Grenada

2013 Findings on the Worst Forms of Child Labor

Moderate Advancement

In 2013, Grenada made a moderate advancement in efforts to eliminate the worst forms of child labor. The Government passed the Electronic Crimes Act, which prohibits child pornography, and launched the National Child Protocol, which contains guidelines for intra-governmental coordination on child protection, investigations, and referrals to appropriate services. It also continued to implement programs that make education a viable alternative to child labor. While the worst forms of child labor do not appear to be a problem in Grenada, the Government's ability to prevent children from becoming engaged in exploitative work is limited due to a lack of express prohibitions against children's involvement in hazardous work and the sale and trafficking of children for forced labor.

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I. Prevalence and Sectoral Distribution of Child Labor

There is no evidence that indicates children in the Grenada are engaged in the worst forms of child labor.(1, 2) Table 1 provides key indicators on children's education in Grenada. Data on some of these indicators are not available from the sources used in this report.

Table 1. Statistics on Children's Work and Education
Working children, ages 5 to 14: Unavailable
School attendance, ages 5 to 14 (%): Unavailable
Children combining work and school, ages 7 to 14 (%): Unavailable
Primary completion rate (%): 111.5

Source for primary completion rate: Data from 2010, published by UNESCO Institute of Statistics, 2014. (3)
Source for all other data: Understanding Children's Work Project's analysis, 2014. (4)

Research found no Government-sponsored efforts to determine if any of the worst forms of child labor exist in Grenada.(2)



II. Legal Framework for the Worst Forms of Child Labor

Grenada has ratified all key international conventions concerning child labor (Table 2).

Table 2. Ratification of International Conventions on Child Labor

Convention Ratification
ILO C. 138, Minimum Age
ILO C. 182, Worst Forms of Child Labor
UN CRC
UN CRC Optional Protocol on Armed Conflict
UN CRC Optional Protocol on the Sale of Children, Child Prostitution and Child Pornography
Palermo Protocol on Trafficking in Persons

The Government has established relevant laws and regulations related to child labor, including its worst forms (Table 3).

Table 3. Laws and Regulations Related to Child Labor

Standard Yes/No Age Related Legislation
Minimum Age for Work Yes 16 Article 32 of the Employment Act (5)
Minimum Age for Hazardous Work No    
List of Hazardous Occupations Prohibited for Children No    
Prohibition of Forced Labor Yes   Article 25 of the Employment Act; Article 4 of the Constitution (5, 6)
Prohibition of Child Trafficking No    
Prohibition of Commercial Sexual Exploitation of Children Yes   Criminal Code; Electronic Crimes Act (2, 7, 8)
Prohibition of Using Children in Illicit Activities No    
Minimum Age for Compulsory Military Recruitment N/A*    
Minimum Age for Voluntary Military Service Yes 19 Police Act No. 38 (2, 9)
Compulsory Education Age Yes 16 Article 2 of the Education Act (10)
Free Public Education Yes   Article 16 of the Education Act (10)

*No conscription or no standing military.

Grenada limits the general "recruitment" of children under the age of 18 for any type of work, but this prohibition does not extend to the employment of children under the age of 18 who offer services spontaneously.(2, 11, 12) Provisions prohibiting the employment of children in hazardous work do not exist.(2, 11, 12) Although the Constitution prohibits slavery and forced labor, the Criminal Code does not specifically prohibit the sale and trafficking of children for forced labor.(7, 8, 11, 13, 14) The Government has ratified ILO C. 182, which covers the use of children by adults for illegal activities; however, research did not find evidence of laws prohibiting the use of children in illicit activities.(2)

In 2013, the Government passed the Electronic Crimes Act, which prohibits the use of children in pornography, as well as the procurement and distribution of child pornography.(2)



III. Enforcement of Laws on the Worst Forms of Child Labor

The Government has established institutional mechanisms for the enforcement of laws and regulations on child labor, including in its worst forms (Table 4).

Table 4. Agencies Responsible for Child Labor Law Enforcement

Organization/Agency Role
Ministry of Labor (MOL), Child Protection Authority (CPA), Royal Grenada Police Force, Ministry of Social Development and Housing (MOSDH), and Ministry of Education truancy officers Enforce laws related to child labor and school attendance.(2, 8)

Labor law enforcement agencies in Grenada took actions to combat child labor, including its worst forms, during the reporting period. MOL employed six labor inspectors and had an overall budget of $317,400 for all its activities in 2013.(2, 8)

As there is no evidence of a problem, there appears to be no current need for criminal law enforcement actions to address child labor, including its worst forms.



IV. Coordination of Government Efforts on the Worst Forms of Child Labor

As there is no evidence of a problem, there appears to be no need for coordinating mechanisms to address child labor, including its worst forms.



V. Government Policies on the Worst Forms of Child Labor

As there is no evidence of a problem, there appears to be no need for policies to address child labor, including its worst forms. However, the Government has a policy that may contribute to the prevention of child labor, including its worst forms (Table 5).

Table 5. Policies Related to Child Labor

Policy Description
National Child Protocol† Implements and strengthens the Child Protection and Adoption Act of 2011. Includes guidelines on areas such as coordination of government efforts related to the protection of children, investigations, and referrals to appropriate social services for victims of child labor, including its worst forms.(2)

†Policy was launched during the reporting period.



VI. Social Programs to Address the Worst Forms of Child Labor

In 2013, the Government of Grenada funded programs that may contribute to the prevention of child labor, including its worst forms (Table 6).

Table 6. Social Programs to Address Child Labor

Program Description
School Feeding Programs*‡ Government program that provides free breakfast and subsidized lunches to primary school students and students in 11 secondary schools; waives lunch fee for students who cannot afford to pay.(2, 15, 16)
Uniform and Transportation Allowances*‡ Government program that covers costs of uniforms and transportation to schools for students from low-income families.(2)

*The impact of this program on child labor does not appear to have been studied.
‡Program is funded by the Government of Grenada



VII. Suggested Government Actions to Eliminate the Worst Forms of Child Labor

Based on the reporting above, suggested actions are identified that would continue the prevention of child labor, including its worst forms, in Grenada (Table 7).

Table 7. Suggested Government Actions to Prevent Child Labor, Including its Worst Forms

Area Suggested Action Year(s) Suggested
Laws Establish specific provisions prohibiting hazardous work for children. 2009 - 2013
Establish prohibitions on the sale and trafficking of children for forced labor. 2009 - 2013
Prohibit the use of children in illicit activities. 2011 - 2013
Social Programs Assess the impact that existing programs may have on preventing child labor. 2013
Conduct research to determine if any of the worst forms of child labor exist in Grenada. 2009 - 2013



1. U.S. Embassy- Grenada. reporting, March 1, 2013.

2. U.S. Embassy- Grenada. reporting, January 31, 2014.

3. UNESCO Institute for Statistics. Gross intake ratio to the last grade of primary. Total. [accessed February 10, 2014]; http://www.uis.unesco.org/Pages/default.aspx?SPSLanguage=EN . Data provided is the gross intake ratio to the last grade of primary school. This measure is a proxy measure for primary completion. For more information, please see the "Children's Work and Education Statistics: Sources and Definitions" section of this report.

4. UCW. Analysis of Child Economic Activity and School Attendance Statistics from National Household or Child Labor Surveys. February 5, Analysis received February 13, 2014. Reliable statistical data on the worst forms of child labor are especially difficult to collect given the often hidden or illegal nature of the worst forms. As a result, statistics on children's work in general are reported in this chart, which may or may not include the worst forms of child labor. For more information on sources used, the definition of working children and other indicators used in this report, please see the "Children's Work and Education Statistics: Sources and Definitions" section of this report.

5. Government of Grenada. Employment Act, Act No. 14 of 1999, enacted 1999. http://www.ilocarib.org.tt/projects/cariblex/pdfs/Grenada_Employment.pdf.

6. Government of Grenada. Constitution, No. 2155 of 1973, enacted 1973. http://pdba.georgetown.edu/constitutions/grenada/gren73eng.html.

7. U.S. Embassy- Grenada. reporting, February 18, 2012.

8. U.S. Embassy- Grenada. reporting, March 1, 2013.

9. Child Soldiers International. Louder than Words: An Agenda for Action to End State Use of Child Soldiers. London; 2012. http://www.child-soldiers.org/global_report_reader.php?id=562.

10. Government of Grenada. Education Act, No. 21 of 2002, enacted 2002. http://laws.gov.gd/.

11. ILO Committee of Experts. Individual Direct Request concerning Worst Forms of Child Labour Convention, 1999 (No. 182) Grenada (ratification: 2003) Submitted: 2011; accessed January 10, 2014; http://www.ilo.org/ilolex/english/iloquery.htm.

12. ILO Committee of Experts. Individual Direct Request concerning Minimum Age Convention, 1973 (No. 138) Grenada (ratification: 2003) Submitted: 2010; accessed January 10, 2014; http://www.ilo.org/ilolex/english/iloquery.htm.

13. ILO Committee of Experts. Individual Direct Request concerning Worst Forms of Child Labour Convention, 1999 (No. 182) Grenada (ratification: 2003) Published: 2014; accessed April 9, 2014; http://www.ilo.org/ilolex/english/iloquery.htm.

14. U.S. Embassy- Grenada. reporting, February 21, 2014.

15. UN Committee on the Rights of the Child. Second Report: Implementation of the Convention on the Rights of the Child: Grenada. Prepared by Government of Grenada, St. George's: September 2007. http://www.unicef.org/barbados/spmapping/Legal/national/Grenada/Reporting/2008_CRCStateReport.doc.

16. U.S. Embassy- Grenada official. E-mail communication to USDOL official. April 19, 2011.