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Grenada


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2012 Findings on the Worst Forms of Child Labor

In 2012, Grenada made a moderate advancement in efforts to eliminate the worst forms of child labor. The Government amended the Criminal Code to extend prohibitions on sale and trafficking for prostitution to boys and ratified both Optional Protocols to the Convention on the Rights of the Child. While the worst forms of child labor do not appear to be a problem in Grenada, the Government’s ability to prevent children from becoming engaged in exploitative work is limited due to a lack of express prohibitions against children’s involvement in hazardous work and the sale and trafficking of children for forced labor.

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Learn More: Findings on the Worst Forms of Child Labor | Previous Reports:



Prevalence and Sectoral Distribution of the Worst Forms of Child Labor

Research has not identified evidence of the worst forms of child labor in Grenada.(3).



Laws and Regulations on the Worst Forms of Child Labor

The Employment Act sets the minimum age for employment at 16 and prohibits forced labor.(4) Provisions prohibiting the employment of children in hazardous work do not exist.(5)

During the reporting period the Government amended the Criminal Code to extend prohibitions on sale and trafficking for prostitution to boys as well as girls. Although the Constitution prohibits slavery and forced labor, the Criminal Code does not specifically prohibit the sale and trafficking of children for forced labor.(5-8) Research did not find evidence of laws prohibiting the use of children in illicit activities.

Grenada has no regular military force and thus no military recruitment.(9, 10) The minimum age to join the police force is 18.(3)

Under the Education Act, schooling is compulsory and free until age 16.(3, 11, 12)

During the reporting period, the Government ratified the Optional Protocols to the CRC on the Sale of Children, Child Prostitution, and Child Pornography and on the Involvement of Children in Armed Conflict.(13, 14)



Institutional Mechanisms for Coordination and Enforcement

As there is no evidence of a problem, there appears to be no need for a coordinating mechanism to address the worst forms of child labor in Grenada.

The Ministry of Labor (MOL), Child Welfare Authority, Royal Grenada Police Force, and Ministry of Education (through its truancy officers) are the government agencies responsible for enforcing laws related to child labor and school attendance. The MOL has no labor inspectors dedicated to child labor; there are six labor inspectors in Grenada responsible for all forms of labor inspection, including child labor.(3) Although labor inspectors are authorized to act on possible child labor law violations that they encounter during their normal duties, child labor inspections are complaint driven. No inspections were carried out during the reporting period because there were no complaints.(3)



Government Policies on the Worst Forms of Child Labor

As there is no evidence of a problem, there appears to be no need for policies to address the worst forms of child labor in Grenada.Although the worst forms of child labor may not be a problem in Grenada, no Government-funded or Government-conducted studies on child work activities were identified to determine if any of the worst forms of child labor exist.



Social Programs to Eliminate or Prevent the Worst Forms of Child Labor

There appears to be no need for programs to address the worst forms of child labor in Grenada in the absence of a demonstrated problem. The Government does implement programs to promote education, however, which may contribute to the prevention of child labor. The Government has a School Feeding Program in its primary schools, which provides free breakfasts and subsidized lunches to students. Eleven secondary schools also participate.(15) The lunch fee is waived for students who cannot afford to pay.(11, 15) The Government also participates in World Bank-funded projects designed to increase children’s access to and improve the quality of secondary education, and to protect vulnerable populations by strengthening social safety nets.(16, 17)



Based on the reporting above, the following actions would advance the elimination of the worst forms of child labor in Grenada:

Area

Suggested Actions

Year(s) Action Recommended

Laws and Regulations

Establish specific provisions prohibiting hazardous work for children.

2009, 2010, 2011, 2012

Establish prohibitions on the sale and trafficking of children for forced labor.

2009, 2010, 2011, 2012

Prohibit the use of children in illicit activities.

2011, 2012

Policies

Conduct research to determine if any of the worst forms of child labor exist in Grenada.

2009, 2010, 2011, 2012



1. UNESCO Institute for Statistics. Gross intake ration to the last grade of primary. Total.; accessed February 4, 2013; http://www.uis.unesco.org/Pages/default.aspx?SPSLanguage=EN. Data provided is the gross intake ratio to the last grade of primary school. This measure is a proxy measure for primary completion. For more information, please see the "Children's Work and Education Statistics: Sources and Definitions" section of this report.

2. UCW. Analysis of Child Economic Activity and School Attendance Statistics from National Household or Child Labor Surveys. February 5, 2013. Reliable statistical data on the worst forms of child labor are especially difficult to collect given the often hidden or illegal nature of the worst forms. As a result, statistics on children's work in general are reported in this chart, which may or may not include the worst forms of child labor. For more information on sources used, the definition of working children and other indicators used in this report, please see the "Children's Work and Education Statistics: Sources and Definitions" section of this report.

3. U.S. Embassy- Grenada. reporting, March 1, 2013.

4. Government of Grenada. Employment Act, Act No. 14 of 1999, enacted 1999. http://www.ilocarib.org.tt/projects/cariblex/pdfs/Grenada_Employment.pdf.

5. ILO Committee of Experts. Individual Direct Request concerning Worst Forms of Child Labour Convention, 1999 (No. 182) Grenada (ratification: 2003) Submitted: 2011; accessed February 2, 2012; http://www.ilo.org/ilolex/english/iloquery.htm.

6. UN Committee on the Rights of the Child. Consideration of Reports Submitted by States Parties Under Article 44 of the Convention: Concluding Observations: Grenada. Geneva; June 11, 2010. Report No. CRC/C/GRD/CO/2. http://www2.ohchr.org/english/bodies/crc/docs/CRC.C.GRD.CO.2.doc.

7. U.S. Embassy- Grenada. reporting, February 18, 2012.

8. U.S. Embassy- Grenada.reporting, March 1, 2013.

9. Coalition to Stop the Use of Child Soldiers. "Caribbean," in Child Soldiers Global Report 2008. London; 2008; http://bit.ly/RB4Kz.

10. CIA. The World Factbook: Grenada, [online] December 21, 2011 [cited February 2, 2012]; https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/index.html.

11. U.S. Embassy- Grenada official. E-mail communication to USDOL official. April 19, 2011.

12. U.S. Embassy- Grenada official. E-mail communication to USDOL official. August 2, 2011.

13. United Nations. Signatories to Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Rights of the Child on the Involvement of Children in Armed Conflict, [online] [cited September 5, 2013]; http://treaties.un.org/Pages/ViewDetails.aspx?src=TREATY&mtdsg_no=IV-11-b&chapter=4&lang=en.

14. United Nations. Signatories to Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Rights of the Child on the Sale of Children, Child Prostitution and Child Pornography, [online] [cited September 5, 2013]; http://treaties.un.org/Pages/ViewDetails.aspx?src=TREATY&mtdsg_no=IV-11-c&chapter=4&lang=en.

15. Government of Grenada. Second Report: Implementation of the Convention on the Rights of the Child; September 2007. http://www.unicef.org/barbados/spmapping/Legal/national/Grenada/Reporting/2008_CRCStateReport.doc.

16. World Bank Projects Database. Education Development- 2nd APL; accessed February 2, 2012; http://www.worldbank.org.

17. World Bank Projects Database. Economic and Social Policy Development Loan; accessed February 2, 2012; http://www.worldbank.org.