Skip to page content
Bureau of International Labor Affairs
Bookmark and Share

Grenada

2014 Findings on the Worst Forms of Child Labor

Moderate Advancement

In 2014, Grenada made a moderate advancement in efforts to eliminate the worst forms of child labor. The Government passed the Prevention of Trafficking in Persons Act, which specifically prohibits the trafficking of children for labor and commercial sexual exploitation. The Government participated in the XVIII Inter-American Conference of Ministers of Labor discussions on the prevention and elimination of child labor, and continued to support programs that provide school meals, uniforms, and transportation costs to students of low-income families. While the worst forms of child labor do not appear to be a problem in Grenada, the Government's ability to prevent children from becoming engaged in exploitative work is limited due to a lack of express prohibitions against children's involvement in hazardous work and illicit activities, including the production and trafficking of drugs.

Sections

Download the Report

Download a PDF of the Grenada report.

English (PDF)

Previous Reports:





I. Prevalence and Sectoral Distribution of Child Labor

Research did not indicate that child labor, including its worst forms, exists in Grenada.(1)



II. Legal Framework for the Worst Forms of Child Labor

Grenada has ratified all key international conventions concerning child labor (Table 1).

Table 1. Ratification of International Conventions on Child Labor

Convention

Ratification

ILO C. 138, Minimum Age

ILO C. 182, Worst Forms of Child Labor

UN CRC

UN CRC Optional Protocol on Armed Conflict

UN CRC Optional Protocol on the Sale of Children, Child Prostitution and Child Pornography

Palermo Protocol on Trafficking in Persons

The Government has established laws and regulations related to child labor, including its worst forms (Table 2).

Table 2. Laws and Regulations Related to Child Labor

Standard

Yes/No

Age

Related Legislation

Minimum Age for Work

Yes

16

Article 32 of the Employment Act (2)

Minimum Age for Hazardous Work

No

 

 

Prohibition of Hazardous Occupations or Activities for Children

No

 

 

Prohibition of Forced Labor

Yes

 

Article 25 of the Employment Act; Article 4 of the Constitution (2, 3)

Prohibition of Child Trafficking

Yes

 

Article 10 of the Prevention of Trafficking in Persons Act (1, 4)

Prohibition of Commercial Sexual Exploitation of Children

Yes

 

Articles 137 and 188 of the Criminal Code; Article 12 of the Electronic Crimes Act; Article 10 of the Prevention of Trafficking in Persons Act (1, 4-6)

Prohibition of Using Children in Illicit Activities

Yes

 

Article 10 of the Prevention of Trafficking in Persons Act; Article 12 of the Electronic Crimes Act (4, 5)

Minimum Age for Compulsory Military Recruitment

N/A†

 

 

Minimum Age for Voluntary Military Service

N/A†

 

 

Compulsory Education Age

Yes

16

Articles 2 and 15 of the Education Act (7)

Free Public Education

Yes

 

Article 16 of the Education Act (7)

† No standing military (8)

The Prevention of Trafficking in Persons Act came into force in June 2014. Article 10 of this act prohibits the human trafficking of children, including for commercial sexual exploitation, and establishes penalties of 25 years imprisonment, a fine of approximately $370,000, or both.(1, 4)

Although the worst forms of child labor do not appear to exist in Grenada, gaps exist in the legal framework to prevent children from involvement in the worst forms of child labor. Article 32 of the Employment Act allows holiday employment for children under the age of 16 and does not specify the minimum age, types of work, or hours permitted for this work.(2) There are no existing provisions prohibiting the employment of children in hazardous work.(1, 9) Although the law prohibits the commercial sexual exploitation of children, research did not indicate there are laws prohibiting the use of children in other illicit activities, including the production and trafficking of drugs.(10)



III. Enforcement of Laws on the Worst Forms of Child Labor

The Government has established institutional mechanisms for the enforcement of laws and regulations on child labor, including in its worst forms (Table 3).

Table 3. Agencies Responsible for Child Labor Law Enforcement

Organization/Agency

Role

Ministry of Labor, Child Protection Authority, Royal Grenada Police Force, Ministry of Social Development and Housing, and Ministry of Education truancy officers

Enforce laws related to child labor and school attendance.(1)

Law enforcement agencies in Grenada took actions to combat child labor, including its worst forms. In 2014, the Ministry of Labor (MOL) employed seven labor inspectors responsible for general labor inspections.(1) MOL labor inspectors did not receive training related to child labor during the reporting period. MOL had a budget of approximately $279,311 to carry out all activities during the reporting period, including labor inspections.(1) There were no complaints or inspections related to child labor during the reporting period. In 2014, members of the Royal Grenada Police Force received training from the U.S. Government on sex crimes, including on components relating to children.(1) During the reporting period, the perpetrator of a 2013 child pornography was convicted and fined approximately $7,400; both the victim and the perpetrator received counseling. There were no new criminal investigations, prosecutions, or convictions relevant to child labor during the reporting period.(1)



IV. Coordination of Government Efforts on the Worst Forms of Child Labor

As there is no evidence of a problem, there appears to be no need for mechanisms to coordinate efforts to address child labor, including its worst forms.



V. Government Policies on the Worst Forms of Child Labor

As there is no evidence of a problem, there appears to be no need for policies to address child labor, including its worst forms. However, the Government has policies that may contribute to the prevention of child labor, including its worst forms (Table 4).

Table 4. Policies Related to Child Labor

Policy

Description

National Child Protocol (2013 — 2014)

Implements and strengthens the Child Protection and Adoption Act of 2011. Includes guidelines on areas such as coordination of government efforts related to the protection of children, investigations, and referrals to appropriate social services for victims of child labor, including its worst forms.(1, 10)

Child Abuse Reporting Guidelines (2013 — 2014)

Requires health care employees to report cases of child abuse.(1)

Poverty Reduction Strategy (2014)†

Supports compulsory school attendance.(1)

† Policy was approved during the reporting period.

In September 2014, Grenada participated in the First Meeting of the Working Groups of the XVIII Inter-American Conference of Ministers of Labor to foster continued dialogue and cooperation on labor issues throughout the Americas. Held in Bridgetown, Barbados, these discussions promoted the exchange of information on policies and programs that seek to formalize the informal sector, uphold workers' rights, and prevent and eliminate child labor.(11, 12)



VI. Social Programs to Address Child Labor

As there is no evidence of a problem, there appears to be no need for programs to address child labor, including its worst forms. However, there is no current research on whether the worst forms of child labor exists in Grenada.(1) In 2014, the Government of Grenada funded programs that may have an impact on child labor (Table 5).

Table 5. Social Programs to Address Child Labor

Program

Description

School Feeding Programs‡

Government program that provides free breakfast and subsidized lunches to primary school students and students in 11 secondary schools; waives lunch fee for students who cannot afford to pay.(10, 13, 14) The Government decreased funding for school meals by approximately $18,500 in 2014.(1)

Uniform and Transportation Allowances‡

Government program that covers costs of uniforms and transportation to schools for students from low-income families.(10) The Government increased support for transportation fees in 2014.(1)

‡ Program is funded by the Government of Grenada.



VII. Suggested Government Actions to Eliminate the Worst Forms of Child Labor

Based on the reporting above, suggested actions are identified that would continue the prevention of child labor, including its worst forms, in Grenada (Table 6).

Table 6. Suggested Government Actions to Prevent Child Labor, Including its Worst Forms

Area

Suggested Action

Year(s) Suggested

Legal Framework

Ensure the law conforms to international standards on light work in order to protect children engaged in holiday employment.

2014

Establish specific provisions prohibiting hazardous work for children.

2009 — 2014

Prohibit the use of children in illicit activities, including the production and trafficking of drugs.

2011 — 2014

Social Programs

Conduct research to determine whether any of the worst forms of child labor exist in Grenada.

2009 — 2014



1.U.S. Embassy- Grenada. reporting, January 15, 2015.

2.Government of Grenada. Employment Act, Act No. 14 of 1999, enacted 1999. http://www.ilo.org/dyn/natlex/docs/WEBTEXT/53925/65176/E99GRD01.htm.

3.Government of Grenada. Constitution, No. 2155 of 1973, enacted 1973. http://pdba.georgetown.edu/constitutions/grenada/gren73eng.html.

4.Government of Grenada. Prevention of Trafficking in Persons Act, enacted June 11, 2014.

5.Government of Grenada. Electronic Crimes Bill, enacted October 3, 2013. http://grenadabroadcast.net/pastshows2/hor1.

6.Government of Grenada. Criminal Code, enacted January 20, 1987. http://www.ilo.org/dyn/natlex/docs/ELECTRONIC/95182/111978/F2077022491/GRD95182.PDF.

7.Government of Grenada. Education Act, No. 21 of 2002, enacted 2002. http://laws.gov.gd/.

8.Child Soldiers International. Louder than Words: An Agenda for Action to End State Use of Child Soldiers. London; 2012. http://www.child-soldiers.org/global_report_reader.php?id=562.

9.ILO Committee of Experts. Individual Direct Request concerning Worst Forms of Child Labour Convention, 1999 (No. 182) Grenada (ratification: 2003) Published: 2014; accessed April 9, 2014; http://www.ilo.org/ilolex/english/iloquery.htm.

10.U.S. Embassy- Grenada. reporting, January 31, 2014.

11.Organization of American States. Agenda, First Meeting of the Working Groups of the XVIII Inter-American Conference of Ministers of Labor (IACML), Organization of American States, [online] [cited December 1, 2014]; https://www.oas.org/en/sedi/dhdee/labor_and_employment/pages/cpo_trab_WG1XVIII_IACML.asp [source on file].

12.Organization of American States. List of Participants, First Meeting of the Working Groups of the XVIII Inter-American Conference of Ministers of Labor (IACML), Organization of American States, [online] [cited December 1, 2014]; https://www.oas.org/en/sedi/dhdee/labor_and_employment/pages/cpo_trab_WG1XVIII_IACML.asp [source on file].

13.UN Committee on the Rights of the Child. Second Report: Implementation of the Convention on the Rights of the Child: Grenada. Prepared by Government of Grenada, September 2007. http://www.unicef.org/barbados/spmapping/Legal/national/Grenada/Reporting/2008_CRCStateReport.doc.

14.U.S. Embassy- Grenada official. E-mail communication to USDOL official. April 19, 2011.