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Secretary of Labor Thomas E. Perez
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Photo Gallery: Secretary Solis, Atty General Eric Holder at Potomac Job Corps
(October 12, 2011)

Images include:

  • Students from the Center's award winning Culinary Program prepare dessert, learning the finer art of presentation and the people skills employers look for.
  • Potomac Job Corps provides academic training, including basic reading and math as well as courses in independent living, employability skills, and social skills to help students transition into the workplace.
  • Job Corps works to ensure that every qualified student obtains his or her GED/high school diploma prior to leaving the center. Students who don't already have a high school diploma upon their arrival at Potomac can enroll in our GED program. Students can also earn their high school diplomas through our partnership with the District of Columbia Public Schools.
  • In addition to academic training, Job Corps provides career technical training in vocational trades including Bricklaying, Business Technologies, Carpentry, Cement Masonry, Culinary Arts, Electrical, Facilities Maintenance, Painting, Pharmacy Technician, Plumbing, and Security.
  • Job Corps graduates also have access to job placement assistance for up to six months, career counseling, and relocation counseling services to help graduates get started in their new careers.
  • During lunch, Attorney General Holder discusses the importance of ensuring equal access to education in the fight against poverty.
  • Solis and Holder listen in as students describe how they ended up at Job Corps, and what they hope to get out of their second chance.
  • Job Corps students had the chance to talk with Solis and Holder about career training, and the impact the program has had in turning their lives around.
  • Potomac Job Corps students and faculty grab a quick photo with their guests.
  • Secretary Solis and Attorney General Holder pose for a photo with students in the Potomac Job Corps Center's Security training program.

Images include:

  • Students from the Center's award winning Culinary Program prepare dessert, learning the finer art of presentation and the people skills employers look for.
  • Potomac Job Corps provides academic training, including basic reading and math as well as courses in independent living, employability skills, and social skills to help students transition into the workplace.
  • Job Corps works to ensure that every qualified student obtains his or her GED/high school diploma prior to leaving the center. Students who don't already have a high school diploma upon their arrival at Potomac can enroll in our GED program. Students can also earn their high school diplomas through our partnership with the District of Columbia Public Schools.
  • In addition to academic training, Job Corps provides career technical training in vocational trades including Bricklaying, Business Technologies, Carpentry, Cement Masonry, Culinary Arts, Electrical, Facilities Maintenance, Painting, Pharmacy Technician, Plumbing, and Security.
  • Job Corps graduates also have access to job placement assistance for up to six months, career counseling, and relocation counseling services to help graduates get started in their new careers.
  • During lunch, Attorney General Holder discusses the importance of ensuring equal access to education in the fight against poverty.
  • Solis and Holder listen in as students describe how they ended up at Job Corps, and what they hope to get out of their second chance.
  • Job Corps students had the chance to talk with Solis and Holder about career training, and the impact the program has had in turning their lives around.
  • Potomac Job Corps students and faculty grab a quick photo with their guests.
  • Secretary Solis and Attorney General Holder pose for a photo with students in the Potomac Job Corps Center's Security training program.