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FY 2002 Annual Performance Plan


DOL Strategic Goals

Goal 1.
A Prepared Workforce:

Enhance opportunities for America's workforce

Goal 2.
A Secure Workforce:

Promote the economic security of workers and families

Goal 3.
Quality Workplaces:

Foster quality workplaces that are safe, healthy, and fair











DOL STRATEGIC GOAL 1
A PREPARED WORKFORCE Enhance opportunities for America's Workforce


OutCome Goal:
Increase employment, earnings, and assistance
Increase the number of youth making a successful transition to work
Improve the effectiveness of information and analysis on the U.S. economy

Total Funds for This Goal (in Billions):

Fiscal Years: FY 2002
Budget:$7.1

Outlays:$6.7

Fiscal Years:FY 2001
Budget:$7.1
Outlays:$7.8

Fiscal Years:FY 2000
Budget:$5.2

Outlays:$6.4

Fiscal Years:FY 1999
Budget:
$7.5

Outlays:$5.8










Outcome Goal 1.1--Increase employment, earnings, and assistance
FY 2002 Performance Goals

Total Funds for This Outcome Goal (in Billions)

Fiscal Years: FY 2002
Budget:$3.4

Outlays:$3.2

Fiscal Years:FY 2001
Budget:$3.4
Outlays:$4.2

Fiscal Years:FY 2000
Budget:$2.4

Outlays:$3.5

Fiscal Years:FY 1999
Budget:
$4.3

Outlays:$3.0

A. Increase the employment, retention, and earnings of individuals registered under the WIA adult program. In Program Year 2002:
70% will be employed in the first quarter after program exit
80% of those employed in the first quarter after program exit will be employed in the third quarter after program exit; and
The average earnings change will be $3,423 for those who are employed in the first quarter after program exit and are still employed in the third quarter after program exit.

B. Increase the retention and earnings of Welfare-to-Work participants placed in unsubsidized employment. In Fiscal Year 2002:
67% will remain in the workforce for two consecutive quarters following the placement quarter; and
The average earnings increase by the second consecutive quarter following the placement quarter will be 7%.

C. Improve the outcomes for job seekers and employers who receive public labor exchange services. In Program Year 2002:
55% *of job seekers registered with the public labor exchange will enter employment with a new employer by the end of the second quarter following registration;
70%* of job seekers will continue to be employed two quarters after initial entry into employment with a new employer; and
The number of job openings listed with the public labor exchange (with both State Employment Security Agencies and America's Job Bank) will increase by 5% over the total for PY 2001

D. Increase the capacity and quality of One-Stop system services for people with disabilities who are registered in the workforce investment area(s) receiving Work Incentive Grants. In Fiscal Year 2002:
The number of people with disabilities registered in these areas will increase by 5%; and
The number of people with disabilities who are registered in these areas and are employed in the quarter after exit will increase by 2%.

E. Increase customer satisfaction with services received from workforce investment activities in connection with the One-Stop delivery system. In Program Year 2002:
Customer satisfaction of participants with WIA services will result in a score of 70 on the American Customer Satisfaction Index; and
Customer satisfaction of employers with One-Stop services will result in a score of 68 on the American Customer Satisfaction Index.

F.Increase by 5% the number of women in the labor force reached directly by the Women's Bureau who have greater knowledge that can assist them in improving their pay and benefits, worklife needs, and career advancement.

G. Increase the employment and retention rate of veteran job seekers registering for public labor exchange services.
55%* of veteran job seekers will be employed in the first or second quarter following registration.
70%* of veteran job seekers will continue to be employed two quarters after initial entry into employment with a new employer.

H. At least 51% of veterans enrolled in Homeless Veteran Reintegration Project grants enter employment.

I. Implement 12 demonstration programs, through grants, designed to develop and test strategies and techniques that need to be implemented in order for One-Stop Centers and WIA youth programs to effectively serve persons with significant disabilities.

* DOL is undergoing a transition to a new labor exchange performance measurement system. These performance goals are estimates and will be revised when baseline data become available.











Outcome Goal 1.2--Increase the Number of Youth Making A Successful Transition to Work
FY 2002 Performance Goals

Total Funds for This Outcome Goal (in Billions)

Fiscal Years: FY 2002
Budget:$3.1

Outlays:$3.0

Fiscal Years:FY 2001
Budget:$3.1
Outlays:$3.1

Fiscal Years:FY 2000
Budget:$2.5

Outlays:$2.5

Fiscal Years:FY 1999
Budget:
$2.7

Outlays:$2.4

A. Increase entrance and retention of youth registered under the WIA youth program in education, training, or employment. In Program Year 2002:
53% of the 14-18 year-old youth will be either employed, in advanced training, post-secondary education, military service or apprenticeships in the third quarter after program exit;
63% of the 19-21 year-old youth will be employed in the first quarter after program exit; and,
77% of the 19-21 year-old youth employed in the first quarter after exit will be employed in the third quarter after program exit.

B. Increase participation, retention, and earnings of Job Corps graduates in employment and education. In Program Year 2002:

C. Increase retention of Youth Opportunity Grant participants in education, training, or employment. In Program Year 2002:
53% of the 14-18 year-old participants placed in employment, the military, advanced training,
post-secondary education, or apprenticeships will be retained at six months; and
72% of the 19-21 year-old participants will be employed in the third quarter after program exit

D. Increase participation of Responsible Reintegration for Young Offender program graduates in education programs or employment.
65% will get jobs or be enrolled in education or training.











Outcome Goal 1.3--Improve the Effectiveness of Information and Analysis on the U.S. Economy
FY 2002 Performance Goals
Total Funds for This Outcome Goal (in Millions)

Fiscal Years: FY 2002
Budget: $518
Outlays: $490

Fiscal Years: FY 2001
Budget: $516
Outlays: $486

Fiscal Years: FY 2000
Budget: $385
Outlays: $373

Fiscal Years: 1999
Budget: $422
Outlays: $395

A. Produce and disseminate timely, accurate, and relevant economic information.

B. Improve the accuracy, efficiency, and relevancy of economic measures.











DOL STRATEGIC GOAL 2

A SECURE WORKFORCE
Promote the Economic Security of Workers and Families

OUTCOME GOALS:

  • Increase compliance with worker protection laws
  • Protect worker benefits
  • Increase employment and earnings for retrained workers

Total Funds for This Goal (in Billions):

Fiscal Years: FY 2002
Budget: $36.3
Outlays: $34.3

Fiscal Years: FY 2001
Budget: $31.0
Outlays: $29.4

Fiscal Years: FY 2000
Budget: $24.8
Outlays: $24.3

Fiscal Years: FY 1999
Budget: $27.0
Outlays: $26.0












Outcome Goal 2.1--Increase Compliance with Worker Protection Laws
FY 2002 Performance Goals
Total Funds for This Outcome Goal (in Millions)
Total Funds for This Outcome Goal (in Millions)

Fiscal Years: FY 2002
Budget: $326
Outlays: $309

Fiscal Years: FY 2001
Budget: $314
Outlays: $289

Fiscal Years: FY 2000
Budget: $242
Outlays: $231

Fiscal Years: FY 1999
Budget: $247
Outlays: $238

A. Covered American workplaces legally, fairly, and safely employ and compensate their workers as demonstrated by:

1. Increased compliance, including among employers which were previous violators and the subject of repeat investigations, with labor standards laws and regulations in nationally targeted industries. In FY 2002, increase compliance:

  • in the garment industry:- to 45% in Los Angeles (recidivism: to 42%) ;
  • in agricultural commodities:- to 54% in cucumber (recidivism: to 44%) and to 43% in garlic (recidivism: establish baseline);
  • in forestry:- to 35% (recidivism: to 20%); and,
  • in the health care industry:- establish baseline for home health care (recidivism: establish baseline).

2. Increased child labor compliance, including among employers which were previous violators and the subject of repeat investigations, in the industries where data indicates that the risk of serious injury to young workers is greatest. In FY 2002, increase compliance in :

  • full service restaurants:- to 85% (recidivism: to 78%)
  • fast food restaurant:- to 75% (recidivism: to 78%); and,
  • grocery stores:- to 85% (recidivism: to 77%).

B. Achieve timely union reporting such that a minimum of 89% of unions with annual receipts greater than $200,000 timely file union annual financial reports for public disclosure access.

C. Increase by 2.5% (to 1,768) per year the number of closed fiduciary investigations of employee pension plans where assets are restored, prohibited transactions are corrected, participant benefits are recovered, or plan assets are protected from mismanagement and risk of future loss is reduced

D. Increase by 2.5% (to 349) per year the number of closed fiduciary investigations of employee health and welfare plans where assets are restored, prohibited transactions are corrected, participant benefits are recovered, or plan assets are protected from mismanagement and risk of future loss is reduced.











Outcome Goal 2.2--Protect Worker Benefits
FY 2002 Performance Goals
Total Funds for This Outcome Goal (in Billions)

Fiscal Years: FY 2002
Budget: $33.9
Outlays: $32.1

Fiscal Years: FY 2001
Budget: $28.6
Outlays: $27.2

Fiscal Years: FY 2000
Budget: $22.9
Outlays: $22.5

Fiscal Years: FY 1999
Budget: $25.2
Outlays: $24.3

  • Unemployed workers receive fair UI benefit eligibility determinations and timely benefit payments. In Fiscal Year 2002:
  • Eligibility Determination Fairness: increase to 30 the number of States meeting or exceeding the minimum performance criterion for benefit adjudication quality; and
  • Payment Timeliness: increase to 49 the number of States meeting or exceeding the Secretary's Standard (minimum performance criterion) for intrastate payment timeliness.
  • Promptly review applications for foreign labor certifications to ensure that aliens admitted to work under foreign labor certification will not adversely affect domestic workers' wages or working conditions. In Fiscal Year 2002: Establish a baseline for the average time required in the ETA's Regional Offices to process applications for permanent alien residency.
  • Increase by 2% (to $67 million) benefit recoveries achieved through the assistance of Pension Benefit Advisors.
  • Increase by 1% the number of workers who are covered by a pension plan sponsored by their employer, particularly women, minorities and workers in small businesses.
  • Return Federal employees to work following an injury as early as appropriate indicated by a 4% reduction from the FY 2000 baseline in the average number of production days lost due to disability.
  • Produce $122 million in cumulative first-year savings (FY 1999-FY 2002) in the FECA program through Periodic Roll Management.
  • In the FECA program, reduce the overall average medical service cost per case (adjusted for inflation) by .5% versus the FY 2000 baseline. Reduce the average annual cost for physical therapy cases by .5% through focus reviews of services charged.
  • Reduce the average processing time to 3 years to send benefit determinations to participants in defined benefit pension plans taken over by PBGC.










Outcome Goal 2.3--Increase Employment and Earnings for Retrained Workers
FY 2002 Performance Goals
Total Funds for This Outcome Goal (in Billions)

Total Funds for This Goal (in Billions):

Fiscal Years: FY 2002
Budget: $2.1
Outlays: $2.0

Fiscal Years: FY 2001
Budget: $2.1
Outlays: $1.9

Fiscal Years: FY 2000
Budget: $1.6
Outlays: $1.5

Fiscal Years: FY 1999
Budget: $1.6
Outlays: $1.4

A. Increase the employment, retention, and earnings replacement of individuals registered under the WIA dislocated worker program. In Program Year 2002:

  • 75% will be employed in the first quarter after program exit;
  • 85% of those employed in the first quarter after program exit will be employed in the third quarter after program exit; and
  • Those who are employed in the first quarter after program exit and are still employed in the third quarter after program exit will have 92% of their pre-dislocation earnings.

B. Increase the employment, retention, and earnings replacement of workers dislocated in important part because of trade and who receive trade adjustment assistance benefits. In Fiscal Year 2002:

  • 75% will be employed in the first quarter after program exit;
  • 85% of those employed in the first quarter after program exit will be employed in the third quarter after program exit; and
  • Those who are employed in the first quarter after program exit and are still employed in the third quarter after program exit will earn, on average, 85% of their pre-separation earnings.










DOL STRATEGIC GOAL 3

QUALITY WORKPLACES
Foster Quality Workplaces that are Safe,
Healthy, and Fair

OUTCOME GOALS:

  • Reduce workplace injuries, illnesses, and fatalities
  • Foster equal opportunity workplaces
  • Support a greater balance between work and family
  • Reduce Exploitation of Child Labor and Address Core International Labor Standards Issues

Total Funds for This Goal (in Billions):

Fiscal Years: FY 2002
Budget: $1.1
Outlays: $1.0

Fiscal Years: FY 2001
Budget: $1.1
Outlays: $1.0

Fiscal Years: FY 2000
Budget: $0.7
Outlays: $0.7

Fiscal Years: FY 1999
Budget: $0.8
Outlays: $0.7











Outcome Goal 3.1--Reduce Workplace Injuries, Illnesses, and Fatalities
FY 2002 Performance Goals
Total Funds for This Outcome Goal (in Millions)

Fiscal Years: FY 2002
Budget: $788
Outlays: $745

Fiscal Years: FY 2001
Budget: $781
Outlays: $739

Fiscal Years: FY 2000
Budget: $587
Outlays: $574

Fiscal Years: FY 1999
Budget: $614
Outlays: $600

  • Reduce the number of mine fatalities and non-fatal injury rate to below the average for the previous five years.
  • Reduce by 5% the percentage of coal dust and silica dust samples that are out of compliance for coal mines and metal and nonmetal high risk mining occupations, respectively.
  • Reduce three of the most significant types of workplace injuries and causes of illnesses by 15%.
  • Reduce injuries and illnesses by 15% in five industries characterized by high-hazard workplaces.
  • Reduce injuries and illnesses (LWDII) by 20% in at least 100,000 workplaces where OSHA initiates an intervention.
  • Decrease fatalities in the construction industry by 15%, by focusing on the four leading causes of fatalities (falls, struck-by, crushed-by, and electrocutions and electrical injuries).
  • Reduce injuries and illnesses by 15% at work sites engaged in voluntary, cooperative relationships with DOL.










Outcome Goal 3.2--Foster Equal Opportunity Workplaces
FY 2002 Performance Goals
Total Funds for This Outcome Goal (in Millions)

Fiscal Years: FY 2002
Budget: $105
Outlays: $99

Fiscal Years: FY 2001
Budget: $105
Outlays: $97

Fiscal Years: FY 2000
Budget: $ 87
Outlays: $80

Fiscal Years: FY 1999
Budget: $ 83
Outlays: $79

  • Federal contractors achieve equal opportunity workplaces as demonstrated by:
  • Improving the equal employment opportunity performance of federal contractors and subcontractors within industries where data indicate the likelihood of equal employment opportunity problems is greatest. In FY 2002, achieve __% improvement over the FY 2001 established baselines;
  • Improving the equal employment opportunity performance of federal contractors and subcontractors that have had prior contact with ESA/OFCCP through evaluations, outreach, or technical assistance. In FY 2002, achieve __% improvement over the FY 2001 established baselines; and,
  • Reducing compensation discrimination by federal contractors and subcontractors. In FY 2002, achieve __% improvement over the FY 2001 established baselines.
  • States that receive DOL financial assistance under the Workforce Investment Act provide benefits and services in a nondiscriminatory manner as evidenced by:
  • Their timely submission of Methods of Administration (MOA) which demonstrate how their programs and activities are operated in a nondiscriminatory manner; and
  • The issuance, within 180 days of the submission of the MOA, of a determination or a conciliation agreement which indicates that the MOA gives reasonable guarantee that benefits and services are provided in a nondiscriminatory manner.










Outcome Goal 3.3--Support a Greater Balance between Work and Family
FY 2002 Performance Goals
Total Funds for This Outcome Goal (in Millions)

Fiscal Years: FY 2002
Budget: $11
Outlays: $11

Fiscal Years: FY 2001
Budget: $11
Outlays: $12

Fiscal Years: FY 2000
Budget: $ 4
Outlays: $ 5

Fiscal Years: FY 1999
Budget: $11
Outlays: $ 8

  • Increase employment and access to quality child care by increasing the number of registered child care apprenticeship programs and the number of newly registered child care apprentices. In Fiscal Year 2002:
  • 49 States will have registered child care apprenticeship programs; and

The number of newly registered child care apprentices will increase by 25% over the FY 1999 baseline.











Outcome Goal 3.4--Reduce Exploitation of Child Labor and Address Core International Labor Standards IssuesFY
2002 Performance Goals
Total Funds for This Outcome Goal (in Millions)

Fiscal Years: FY 2002
Budget: $179
Outlays: $169

Fiscal Years: FY 2001
Budget: $181
Outlays: $179

Fiscal Years: FY 2000
Budget: $ 66
Outlays: $ 59

Fiscal Years: FY 1999
Budget: $ 49
Outlays: $ 40

A. Reduce exploitative child labor by promoting international efforts and targeting focused initiatives in selected countries to include these objectives:

  • 8 countries will ratify International Labor Organization (ILO) Convention 182 on Worst Forms of Child Labor.
  • 7 countries will establish National Action Plans.
  • 100,000 children in developing countries will be targeted for prevention and/or removal from exploitative work and placed in educational settings.
  • 50,000 children in developing countries will be prevented and/or removed from exploitative work.
  • 70% of children removed from child labor will be placed in educational settings.
  • Establish baseline for a rate of retention for children placed in educational settings.
  • Advance workers' protections and economic status in developing countries to include these objectives:
  • 7 countries commit to undertake improvements in assuring compliance and implementation of core labor standards.
  • 6 project countries will commit with US/DOL assistance to make substantive improvements in raising income levels of working families.










Outcome Goal Financial Management: Maintain the Integrity and Stewardship of the Department's Financial Resources
FY 2002 Performance Goals

FM1. All DOL financial systems meet the standards set in the Federal Financial Management Improvement Act (FFMIA) and the Government Management Reform Act (GMRA).

FM2. DOL meets all new accounting standards issued by the Federal Accounting Systems Advisory Board (FASAB) including the Managerial Cost Accounting Standard.











Outcome Goal IT: Improve Organizational Performance and Communication through Effective Deployment of IT Resources
FY 2002 Performance Goals

IT1 Improve automated access to administrative and program systems, services and information.











Outcome Goal HR: Establish DOL as a Model Workplace
FY 2002 Performance Goals

HR1. The right people are in the right place at the right time to carry out the mission of the Department.

HR2. Reduce the rate of lost production days by two percent (i.e., number of days employees spend away from work due to injuries and illnesses).

HR3. Reduce the overall occurrence of injuries and illnesses for DOL employees by 5 percent, and improve the timeliness of filing injury/illness claims by 5 percent.











Outcome Goal PR: Improve Procurement Management
FY 2002 Performance Goals

PR1: Complete public-private or direct conversion competitions on not less than five percent of the FTE listed on DOL's Federal Activities Inventory Reform Act listings.











1.1A
Performance Goal: Increase the employment, retention, and earnings of individuals registered under the WIA adult program.

Performance Results: PY 2000: N/A

PY 1999: N/A

Indicator: PY 2002:

  • 70% will be employed in the first quarter after program exit;
  • 80% of those employed in the first quarter after program exit will be employed in the third quarter after program exit; and
  • The average earnings change will be $3,423 for those who are employed in the first quarter after program exit and are still employed in the third quarter after program exit.

PY 2001:

  • 68% will be employed in the first quarter after program exit;
  • 78% of those employed in the first quarter after program exit will be employed in the third quarter after program exit; and
  • The average earnings change will be $3,361 for those who are employed in the first quarter after program exit and are still employed in the third quarter after program exit

PY 2000:

  • 67% will be employed in the first quarter after program exit;
  • 77% of those employed in the first quarter after program exit will be employed in the third quarter after program exit; and
  • The average earnings change will be $3,264 for those who are employed in the first quarter after program exit and are still employed in the third quarter after program exit.

PY 1999: N/A

Data Source: Workforce Investment Act Standardized Record Data (WIASRD) included in the Enterprise Information Management System (EIMS); UI Wage Records

Baseline: There is no prior experience with this WIA indicator, which is based on the use of UI wage records. PY 2000, the first full year of WIA implementation, will constitute the baseline year for this measure. The performance measure will be derived from the agreed upon levels of performance for all States. Because there is no comparable baseline, these measures will be regularly reviewed for appropriateness and rigor as performance data becomes available.

Comment: The current FY 1999-2004 Strategic Plan includes the new WIA goal based upon a weighted average of negotiated levels of performance for all States. The goals for PY 2000, PY 2001 and PY 2002 stated in this plan also reflect these negotiated levels for all States.











1.1B
Performance Goal: Increase the retention and earnings of Welfare-to-Work participants placed in unsubsidized employment.

Performance Results: FY 2000: The goal was achieved. Of those Welfare-to-Work (WtW) participants placed in unsubsidized employment, 84% remained in the workforce for six months with 59% average earnings increase by the second consecutive quarter following the placement quarter.

FY 1999: N/A

Indicator

FY 2002:

  • 67% will remain in the workforce for two consecutive quarters following the placement quarter; and
  • The average earnings increase by the second consecutive quarter following the placement quarter will be 7%.

FY 2001:

  • 66% will remain in the workforce for six months; and
  • The average earnings increase by the second consecutive quarter following placement will be 6%.

FY 2000:

  • 60% will remain in the workforce for six months; and
  • The average earnings increase by the second consecutive quarter following placement will be 5%.

FY1999: N/A

Data Source: WtW Quarterly Financial Status Report

Baseline: New Goal. The baseline for this performance measure will be FY 2000.

Comment: The 84 percent retention rate achieved in FY 2000 is attributed largely to the strong WtW emphasis on post-employment and other supportive services. The 59 percent earnings increase rate is likely to be inflated due to misinterpretations of the reporting guidance by a number of grantees. DOL will use corrected data to establish new baselines for FY 2002 goals and evaluate the need to revise the targets for the goals upward. DOL anticipates raising the FY 2002 retention and earnings increase goals.











1.1C
Performance Goal: Improve the outcomes for job seekers and employers who receive public labor exchange services.

Performance Results: PY 2000: N/A for all indicators.

PY 1999: Achieved for all indicators.

Indicator PY 2002:

  • 55%* of job seekers registered with the public labor exchange will enter employment with a new employer by the end of the second quarter following registration;
  • 70%* of job seekers will continue to be employed two quarters after initial entry into employment with a new employer; and
  • The number of job openings listed with the public labor exchange (with both SESAs and AJB) will increase by 5% over the total for PY 2001.

PY 2001:

  • 75% of job seekers will have unsubsidized jobs six months after initial entry into employment; and
  • The total number of job openings listed with the public employment service, including both those listed with State Employment Security Agencies (SESAs) and those listed directly with America's Job Bank (AJB) via the Internet, will increase by 10 percent.

PY 2000:

  • Increase by 1 percentage point the share of applicants who receive labor exchange services that enter employment, resulting in more than 3.2 million Employment Service applicants entering employment;
  • Increase by 15%, the total number of job openings listed with the public employment service, including both those listed with State Employment Security Agencies (SESAs) and those listed directly with America's Job Bank (AJB) via the Internet; and
  • Increase the number of new employers registered with America's Job Bank from 51,000 to 60,000.

PY 1999:

  • Increase by 1 percentage point the share of applicants who receive labor exchange services that enter employment; and
  • The total number of job openings listed with the public employment service, including both those listed with State Employment Security Agencies (SESAs) and those listed directly with America's Job Bank (AJB) via the Internet.

Data Source: State reports, UI wage records, and AJB Center Reports.

Baseline: During PY 2001, DOL will transition to a new Labor Exchange Performance Measurement system. A baseline will be established for the entered employment rate and retention rate goals based on PY 2001 results. Baseline data currently do not exist for the job seeker entered employment and employment retention goals.

PY 2001 data will be the baseline for job openings listed.

Comment: Indicators for job seekers were revised to be consistent with the new WIA program.

*ETA is undergoing a transition to a new labor exchange performance measurement system. These performance goals are estimates and will be revised when baseline data become available.











1.1D
Performance Goal: Increase the capacity and quality of One-Stop system services for people with disabilities who are registered in the workforce investment area(s) receiving Work Incentive Grants.

Performance Results: FY 2000: The goal was achieved. Grants were awarded to 23 state or local recipients.

FY 1999: N/A

Indicator: FY 2002:

  • The number of people with disabilities registered in these areas will increase by 5%; and
  • The number of people with disabilities who are registered in these areas and are employed in the quarter after exit will increase by 2%.

FY 2001:

  • The number of people with disabilities served will increase by 5%; and
  • The rate of unsubsidized employment in the local Workforce Investment Area will increase by 2 percentage points.

FY 2000: The new Work Incentive Grant program will be implemented by September 30, 2000, with plans for 20 to 40 awards in State and local areas to enhance services for people with disabilities in the One-Stop Center environment.

FY 1999: N/A

Data Source: Workforce Investment Act Standardized Record Data (WIASARD) included in the Enterprise Information Management System (EIMS) from State and/or local areas receiving Work Incentive Grants

Baseline: New Goal. The baseline is to be established using PY 2000 WIA data. The baseline will be the number of people with disabilities, as of the beginning of FY 2001 (10/1/00), registered in the workforce area(s) that receive Work Incentive Grants and the number of those registered who are employed in the quarter after exit. Because there is no comparable baseline, these measures will be regularly reviewed for appropriateness and rigor as performance data becomes available.

Comment: The Work Incentive Grant program is directed to systemic change for people with disabilities obtaining services under the WIA. Therefore, the current (FY2002) strategic goals are established based upon the extent to which the One-Stop delivery system in the workforce areas which receive grants increase the percent of people with disabilities served.











1.1E
Performance Goal: Increase customer satisfaction with services received from workforce investment activities in connection with the One-Stop delivery system.

Performance Results: PY 2000: N/A

PY 1999: N/A

Indicator: PY 2002:

  • Customer satisfaction of participants with WIA services will result in a score of 70 on the American Customer Satisfaction Index; and
  • Customer satisfaction of employers with One-Stop services will result in a score of 68 on the American Customer Satisfaction Index.

PY 2001:

  • Customer satisfaction of participants with WIA services will result in a score of 69 on the American Customer Satisfaction Index; and
  • Customer satisfaction of employers with One-Stop services will result in a score of 66 on the American Customer Satisfaction Index.

PY 2000:

  • Customer satisfaction of participants with WIA services will result in a score of 67 on the American Customer Satisfaction Index; and
  • Customer satisfaction of employers with One-Stop services will result in a score of 65 on the American Customer Satisfaction Index.

PY 1999: N/A

Data Source: WIA State reports

Baseline: The goal was based upon limited grantee experience gathering participant customer satisfaction information, including pilot projects.

Comment: The indicator is an index of participant and employer customer satisfaction based upon three questions that will be asked of a sample of WIA program exiters and three questions that will be asked of a sample of employers. The index is based upon the American Customer Satisfaction Index.

The current FY 1999-2004 Strategic Plan includes the new WIA goal based upon a weighted average of negotiated levels of performance for all States. The goals for PY 2000, PY 2001 and PY 2002 stated in this plan also reflect these negotiated levels for all States.











1.1F
Performance Goal: FY 2002: Increase by 5% the number of women in the labor force reached directly by the Women's Bureau who have greater knowledge that can assist them in improving their pay and benefits, worklife needs, and career advancement.

FY 2001: Prepare 27,500 for the labor force by providing them with tools and education on equal pay, etc.

FY 2000: Prepare 25,000 for the labor force by providing them with tools and education on equal pay, etc.

FY 1999: N/A

Performance Results: FY 2000: The goal was achieved. The 31,588 women directly assisted surpassed the target of 25,000 by 26%.

FY 1999: N/A

Indicator:

  • Number of individual women provided direct assistance and/or consultation by the Women's Bureau
  • Number of women served through service providers trained by the Women's Bureau
  • Number of women provided assistance to gain entry into nontraditional jobs through WANTO grants
  • Number of low-income women provided assistance to gain entry into high wage, high tech careers
  • Number of young women (middle and high school students) who are given information to assist them in making informed decisions for careers in the high-tech industry

Data Source:

  • Regional and National Office Tracking/Ticketing System
  • Regional and National Office Log of Correspondence from Customers Seeking Assistance
  • WANTO, Grant Report
  • Women Work! Grant Report
  • Grantee Evaluation Forms
  • Comment Cards
  • WB OMB approved evaluation form

Baseline: 25,000 women prepared in FY2000

Comment: The true measurement for this goal is the degree of knowledge gained by women and the extent it enabled successful entry into the work force and/or improvements in pay, benefits, working conditions, etc. Approximately 2 million women are indirectly affected through policy and other advocacy efforts.











1.1G
Performance Goal: FY 2002: Increase the employment and retention rate of veteran job seekers registering for public labor exchange services

  • *55% of veteran job seekers will be employed in the first or second quarter following registration.
  • * 70% of veteran job seekers will continue to be employed two quarters after initial entry into employment with a new employer.

FY 2001: N/A

FY 2000: N/A

FY 1999: N/A

Performance Results: FY 2000: N/A

FY 1999: N/A

Indicator: Employment and retention rate of veteran job seekers after registering for public labor exchange services.

Note: In addition to veterans, "other eligible persons" as defined by Title 38 also receive employment services and are counted as part of this goal. Under Title 38, "eligible person" means a) the spouse of any person who died of a service-connected disability, and b) the spouse of any member of the Armed Forces serving on active duty who, at the time of application for assistance meets specific criteria as provided in this Title. The portion of the serviced population which comprises "other eligible persons" is less than ½ of 1% of the total population served.

Data Source: State reports and UI wage records.

Baseline: FY 2002. Because there is no comparable baseline, these measures will be regularly reviewed for appropriateness and rigor as performance data becomes available.

Comment: DOL is undergoing a transition to a new labor exchange performance measurement system. These performance goals are estimates and will be revised when baseline data become available.











1.1H
Performance Goal: FY 2002: At least 51% of veterans enrolled in homeless veterans reintegration project enter employment

FY 2001: Same as FY 2002.

FY 2000: N/A

Performance Results: FY 2000: N/A

FY 1999: N/A

Indicator: Number of those veterans and other eligible persons enrolled in HVRP who enter employment

Note: In addition to veterans "other eligible persons" as defined by Title 38 also receive employment services and are counted as part of this goal. See definition for other eligible persons in the preceding goal matrix.

Data Source: Reports submitted by VETS grantees

Baseline: FY 2001: Baseline will be established in FY 2001.

Comment: The HVRP program has had a rapid expansion since FY 1999, with many new grantees. As these grantees gain experience dealing with this hard to serve population, performance results are expected to increase.









1.1I
Performance Goal: FY 2002: Implement 12 demonstration programs, through grants, designed to develop and test strategies and techniques that need to be implemented in order for One Stop Centers and WIA youth programs to effectively serve persons with significant disabilities.

Performance Results:

FY 1999: N/A

Indicator: Number of demonstration programs implemented

Data Source: Administrative data

Baseline: N/A

Comment: The new Office of Employment Disability Policy will use program evaluation and demonstration programs as key elements for achieving the mission of the office. The demonstration programs will be evaluated and those found successful will be implemented in the WIA youth programs and the One-Stop system..











Outcome Goal 1.2: Increase the Number of Youth Making A Successful Transition to Work--Performance Goals

1.2A
Performance Goal: Increase entrance and retention of youth registered under the WIA youth program in education, training, or employment.

Performance Results: PY 2000: N/A

PY 1999: N/A

Indicator: PY 2002:

  • 53% of the 14-18 year-old youth will be either employed, in advanced training, post-secondary education, military service or apprenticeships in the third quarter after program exit;
  • 63% of the 19-21 year-old youth will be employed in the first quarter after exit; and
  • 77% of the 19-21 year-old youth employed in the first quarter after exit will be employed in the third quarter after program exit.

PY 2001:

  • 50% of the 14-18 year-old youth will be either employed, in advanced training, post-secondary education, military service or apprenticeships in the third quarter after program exit; and
  • 70% of the 19-21 year-old youth will be employed in the third quarter after program exit.

PY 2000:

  • 48% of the 14-18 year-old youth will be either employed, in advanced training, post-secondary education, military service or apprenticeships in the third quarter after program exit; and
  • 69% of the 19-21 year-old youth will be employed in the third quarter after program exit.

PY 1999: N/A

Data Source: State WIA reports included in the Enterprise Information System (EIMS); UI wage records

Baseline: Younger Youth Indicator: There is no prior experience with this indicator and no basis for approximating a baseline from JTPA reports. The negotiation process for establishing expected levels of performance included information about the percentage of all low income youth who completed high school in each State (the national average is about 75%), the percentage of JTPA youth who completed a major level of education among those who were school dropouts, and the expected relative levels of service to in-school youth and dropouts.

Older Youth Indicator: There is no prior experience with this WIA indicator which is based on the use of UI wage records. An approximation of the goal was derived by analysis of the JTPA program experience of seven States using WIA indicator specifications.

Because there is no comparable baseline, these measures will be regularly reviewed for appropriateness and rigor as performance data becomes available.

Comment: Quantified levels for performance measures under the Workforce Investment Act (WIA) were developed through cooperative negotiation between DOL, its partners, and stakeholders. A small number of States began early implementation of WIA in PY 1999. For the younger youth indicator, data had not previously been collected which could have assisted in the development of a baseline for this measure. As data becomes available from the remaining States, a revised baseline level will be established or revised as necessary. For the older youth indicator, the 2000 and 2001 goals served as a proxy measure for the expected level of performance based upon levels negotiated with a limited number of early implementing States. The goal went from 70% to 69% for PY 1999. Note: The goal excludes youth who go on to post secondary education or advanced training.











1.2B
Performance Goal: Increase participation, retention, and earnings of Job Corps graduates in employment and education.

Performance Results: PY 2000: N/A

PY 1999: The goal was achieved: 88.3% of Job Corps graduates entered employment or enrolled in education. For those placed in jobs, the average hourly wage was $7.49.

Indicator: PY 2002:

  • 88.5% will enter employment or be enrolled in education;
  • Graduates with jobs will be employed at average hourly wages of $7.90; and
  • 70% will continue to be employed or enrolled in education six months after their initial placement date.

PY 2001:

  • 85% of Job Corps graduates will get jobs with entry average hourly wages of $7.25 or be enrolled in education;
  • 70% will continue to be employed or enrolled in education six months after their initial placement date.

PY 2000:

  • Increase the percent of Job Corps graduates who get jobs or pursue education to 85%;
  • those who get jobs will have an average entry wage increase from the previous year and 70% will still have a job or will be pursuing education after 90 days.

PY 1999:

  • 75% of Job Corps trainees will get jobs or pursue further education, with those obtaining jobs having an average starting wage of $6.50 per hour.

Data Source: Job Corps Management Information System

Data Source: Job Corps Management Information System

Baseline: The PY 2000 results will serve as the baseline, due to a change in the graduate definition in 7/00 to reflect additional requirements for graduation. This information will be compiled and made available in August, 2001.

Comment: Job Corps targets severely disadvantaged youth with a variety of barriers to self-sufficiency, including deficiencies in education and job skills. To achieve the enhanced quality of placement and job retention required by the WIA, in FY 2002 Job Corps will focus resources on program improvements that enhance the full Job Corps experience for students, from reinforced outreach and admission strategies and center program effectiveness to intensified center and post-center career development support.

Job Corps introduced a new graduate definition effective 7/00 to reflect additional requirements for graduation. Requirements under this new definition include skill attainment associated with the Career Preparation Period, participation in community service projects, and participation in employer-based work experience.











1.2C
Performance Goal: Increase retention of Youth Opportunity Grant participants in education, training, or employment.

Performance Results: PY 2000: N/A

PY 1999: N/A

Indicator: PY 2002:

  • 53% of the 14-18 year-old participants placed in employment, the military, advanced training, post-secondary education, or apprenticeships will be retained at six months.
  • 72% of the 19-21 year-old participants will be employed in the third quarter after program exit.

PY 2001:

  • 50% of the 14-18 year-old participants placed in employment, the military, advanced training, post-secondary education, or apprenticeships will be retained at six months.
  • 70% of the 19-21 year-old participants will be employed in the third quarter after program exit.

PY 2000:

  • 48% of the 14-18 year-old participants placed in employment, the military, advanced training, post-secondary education, or apprenticeships will be retained at six months.
  • 69% of the 19-21 year-old participants will be employed in the third quarter after program exit.

PY 1999: N/A

Data Source: Grantee reports

Baseline: Younger Youth Indicator: The baseline for this program will be established in PY 2000.

Older Youth Indicator: The baseline for this program will be established in PY 2000.

Because there is no comparable baseline, these measures will be regularly reviewed for appropriateness and rigor as performance data becomes available.

Comment: The Youth Opportunity initiative is authorized under the new Workforce Investment Act. It is aimed at increasing the long-term employment of youth living in high-poverty communities. As planned, further development and refinements to the programs and the measures resulted in some revisions to the goal.











1.2D
Performance Goal: Increase participation of Responsible Reintegration for Young Offender Program graduates in education programs or employment.

Performance Results: FY 2000: N/A

FY 1999: N/A

Indicator: FY 2002: 65% will get jobs or be enrolled in education or training.

FY 2001: 65% will get jobs or be enrolled in education or training.

FY 1999-FY 2000: N/A

Data Source: Youthful Offender Program Management Information System.

Baseline: This is a new initiative. Because there is no comparable baseline, these measures will be regularly reviewed for appropriateness and rigor as performance data becomes available.

Comment: Youthful offenders are a particularly difficult population to serve. Also, most employers do not readily hire individuals with criminal records.











1.3A
Performance Goal: FY 2002: Produce and disseminate timely, accurate, and relevant economic information

FY 1999-2001: Same as FY 2002.

Performance Results: FY 2000: The goal was substantially achieved. BLS missed the timeliness target for the Employment Cost Index (ECI) and the quality target for the Producer Price Index (PPI).

FY 1999: The goal was not achieved. BLS missed the timeliness targets for the National Labor Force; Employment, Hours, and Earnings; and PPI, and the quality target for the PPI.

Indicator: Percentage of releases of National Labor Force; Employment, Hours, and Earnings; Consumer Prices and Price Indexes; Producer Prices and Price Indexes; and Employment Cost Index that are prepared on time; measures of quality for each Principal Federal Economic Indicator; average number of Internet site user sessions each month.

Data Source: Office of Publications and Special Studies report of release dates against release schedule of BLS Principal Federal Economic Indicators; Press releases for each Economic Indicator; Internet site analysis software.

Baseline: Timeliness measures for FY 1997: National Labor Force (100 percent); Employment, Hours, and Earnings (100 percent); Consumer Prices and Price Indexes (100 percent); Producer Prices and Price Indexes (100 percent); and Employment Cost Index (100 percent).

Quality measures:

National Labor Force: Number of months that a change of at least 0.25 percentage point in the monthly national unemployment rate will be statistically significant at the 90 percent confidence level = 12. (Baseline is FY 1997.)

Employment, Hours, and Earnings: Root mean square error of total nonfarm employment (a measure of the amount of revision) <70,000. (Baseline is FY 2000.)

Consumer Prices and Price Indexes: Number of months that the standard error on the 12-month change in the U.S. City Average All Items CPI-U Index was 0.25 percentage point or less = 12. (Baseline is FY 1999.)

Producer Prices and Price Indexes: (1) Percent of domestic output, within the scope of the PPI, that is covered by the PPI: goods produced = 85.1 percent; services produced = 38.8 percent; total production = 52.6 percent. (Baseline is FY 1997.) (2) Percent of months that the change in the one-month Finished Goods Index (not seasonally adjusted) between the first-published and final release was +0.2 percent. (Baseline will be set in FY 2001.)

Employment Cost Index: Number of quarters the change in the Civilian Compensation Less Sales Workers Index was within +0.5 percent at the 90 percent confidence level = 4. (Baseline is FY 1998.)

Internet Usage: Average number of user sessions each month = 707,347. (Baseline is FY 1999.)

Comment:











1.3B
Performance Goal: FY 2002: Improve the accuracy, efficiency, and relevancy of economic measures.

FY 1999-2001: Same as FY 2002.

Performance Results: FY 2000: The goal was achieved. Since the performance indicators are the accomplishment of milestones that are specific to the fiscal year, there is no continuity in indicators from year to year, even though the performance goal remained the same.

FY 1999: The goal was achieved.

Indicator: Complete full implementation of a four-year outlet rotation cycle.

Data Source: BLS Quarterly Review and Analysis System

Baseline: Since activities described are new activities, there are no baseline measures.

Comment: Since activities described in all indicators are new activities, there are no corresponding FY 1999-2000 results, FY 2001 measures, or baseline measures.











2.1A
Performance Goal: FY 2002: Covered American workplaces legally, fairly, and safely employ and compensate their workers as demonstrated by:

  • Increased compliance, including among employers which were previous violators and the subject of repeat investigations, with labor standards laws and regulations in nationally targeted industries. In FY 2002, increase compliance:
  • -in the garment industry:- to 45% in Los Angeles (recidivism: to 42%) ;
  • - in agricultural commodities:- to 54% in cucumber (recidivism: to 44%) and to 43% in garlic (recidivism: establish baseline);
  • -in forestry:- to 35% (recidivism: to 20%); and,
  • -in the health care industry:- establish baseline for home health care (recidivism: establish baseline).
  • Increased child labor compliance, including among employers which were previous violators and the subject of repeat investigations, in the industries where data indicates that the risk of serious injury to young workers is greatest. In FY 2002, increase compliance in :
  • -full service restaurants:-to 85% (recidivism: to 78%)
  • -fast food restaurant:- to 75% (recidivism: to 78%); and,
  • -grocery stores:- to 85% (recidivism: to 77%).

FY 2001:

Garment:- increase to 85% in San Francisco and 42% in New York City (recidivism: 90% in San Francisco and 57% in New York City); in agricultural commodities:- 47% in onion, 80% in tomato, and 70% in lettuce (recidivism: 64% in tomato, 47% in onion and 48% in lettuce); health care:- 62% in residential health care (assisted living facilities) (recidivism: 60%).

Activities ongoing in FY 2001 to support goal accomplishment in FY 2002 (recidivism: ongoing activities to support goal accomplishment in FY 2002).

FY 2000:

Garment:- increase to 45% in Los Angeles (recidivism: establish baseline) Agricultural Commodities:- establish baseline for garlic (recidivism: establish baseline)

Poultry Processing:- 5% increase (recidivism: 5% increase)

Forestry:- establish baseline (recidivism: (establish baseline)

Health Care:- 5% increase in nursing homes (recidivism: 5% increase)

Establish baselines for the restaurant and grocery industries (recidivism: establish baselines)

FY 1999: Increase compliance with labor standards laws and regulations by 5% in the San Francisco and New York City garment industries (recidivism: establish baselines); in the agricultural industry, establish baselines for the commodities of onions, lettuce and cucumbers; and establish baseline for residential health care (assisted living facilities) (recidivism: establish baseline.)

N/A--Child labor compliance.

Performance Results: FY 2000:

1. The garment, poultry processing and healthcare (nursing homes) industry goals were not met.

The forestry and agriculture (garlic) goals were met.

The garment, poultry processing, healthcare (nursing home) and agriculture (garlic) recidivism goals were not met.The forestry recidivism goal was met.

2. The child labor goal was met. The compliance surveys established a baseline of 79% in full service restaurants, 70% in fast food restaurants, and 82% in grocery stores. The child labor recidivism goal was met. The compliance surveys established baselines of 53% in full service restaurants, 73% in fast food restaurants and 72% in grocery stores.

FY 1999:

1. The garment goal was not met, remaining goals were met.

2. N/A--Child labor compliance.

Indicator: Trends in compliance/violation rates by industry (NAIC Code); changes in results of compliance surveys in targeted industries

Data Source: Wage Hour Investigator Support and Reporting Database (WHISARD); results of compliance surveys

Baseline: Industry/sector-specific baseline data

79% compliance in the San Francisco garment industry ( 1997); recidivism: 86% (1999)

37% compliance in the New York City garment industry ( 1997); recidivism: 52% (1999)

22% compliance in the Los Angeles garment industry ( 1994); recidivism: 37% (2000)

75% compliance in tomato commodities ( 1996); recidivism: 59% (1998)

70% compliance in the nursing home industry ( 1998); recidivism: 76% (1997)

57% compliance in residential health care (assisted living facilities); recidivism 55% (1999)

40% compliance in the poultry processing industry; recidivism 40% (1998)

49% compliance in cucumber commodities; recidivism 37% (1999)

42% compliance in onion commodities; recidivism 42% (1999)

65% compliance in lettuce commodities; recidivism 43% (1999)

38% compliance in garlic commodity (2000); recidivism: TBD

30% compliance in forestry (planting and thinning); recidivism 15% (2000)

Comment: Because there is no unbiased industry-wide database on labor standards violations or compliance, the Wage and Hour Division faces a challenge in determining industry-wide levels of compliance, measuring changes in compliance and attributing causality for any changes. To determine the impact of Wage and Hour efforts, a statistically sound method for establishing baselines and measuring compliance was developed using investigation-based compliance surveys of targeted industries and areas.

Based on results, specific industries and/or industry sectors will be re-surveyed every 2 to 3 years.











2.1B
Performance Goal: FY 2002: Achieve timely union reporting such that a minimum of 89% of unions with annual receipts greater than $200,000 timely file union annual financial reports for public disclosure access.

FY 2001: Achieve timely union reporting such that a minimum of 88% of unions with annual receipts greater than $200,000 timely file union annual financial reports for public disclosure access.

FY 2000: Minimum of 87% of unions with annual receipts greater than $200,000 timely file union annual financial reports for public disclosure.

FY 1999: 85% of unions with receipts greater than $200,000, timely file union annual financial reports for public disclosure.

Performance Results: FY 2000: The goal was achieved for FY 2000. 87.2% of unions with annual receipts greater than $200,000 timely filed union annual financial reports for public disclosure access.

FY 1999: The goal was met. 89.8% of unions with annual receipts greater than $200,000 timely filed union annual financial reports for public disclosure access.

Indicator: Percentage of financial reports timely filed for public disclosure availability

Data Source: Labor Organization Reporting System

Baseline: Timely filing of annual financial reports required of unions with annual receipts over $200,000: 79% in FY 1997

Comment: The indicators reflect union compliance with laws established to ensure democratic practices and financial integrity in unions in the American workforce.











2.1C
Performance Goal: FY 2002: Increase by 2.5% (to 1,768) per year the number of closed fiduciary investigations of employee pension plans where assets are restored, prohibited transactions are corrected, participant benefits are recovered, or plan assets are protected from mismanagement and risk of future loss is reduced.

FY 2001: Increase by 2.5% (to 1,725) per year the number of closed fiduciary investigations of employee pension plans where assets are restored, prohibited transactions are corrected, participant benefits are recovered, or plan assets are protected from mismanagement and risk of future loss is reduced.

FY 2000: 2.1C Increase by 2.5% both the number of closed investigations of employee pension and health benefits plans where assets are restored (to 819) and the number where prohibited transactions are reversed (to 301).

FY 1999: 2.1C Increase by 2.5% both the number of closed investigations of employee pension and health benefits plans where assets are restored (to 537) and prohibited transactions are corrected (to 241)

Performance Results: FY 2000: The goal was achieved. 1,187 cases where assets were restored and 538 cases where Prohibited Transactions were corrected.

FY 1999: Goal was achieved. 958 cases where assets were restored and 389 cases where Prohibited Transactions were corrected.

Indicator: Number of closed fiduciary investigations of employees' pension plans where assets are restored, prohibited transactions are corrected, participant benefits are recovered, or plan assets are protected

Data Source: Enforcement Management Systems

Baseline: The number of investigations of employee pension plans where assets are restored, prohibited transactions are corrected, participant benefits are recovered, or plan assets are protected for FY 1999-2000 (1,683).

Comment: The protection of plan assets is the primary investigative purpose. When plan assets have been potentially endangered by an imprudent act on the part of a plan fiduciary or have otherwise been misused, DOL seeks to have the plan made whole through the restoration of assets.











2.1D
Performance Goal: FY 2002: Increase by 2.5% (to 349) per year the number of closed fiduciary investigations of employee health and welfare plans where assets are restored, prohibited transactions are corrected, participant benefits are recovered, or plan assets are protected from mismanagement and risk of future loss is reduced.

FY 2001: Increase by 2.5% (to 340) per year the number of closed fiduciary investigations of employee health and welfare plans where assets are restored, prohibited transactions are corrected, participant benefits are recovered, or plan assets are protected from mismanagement and risk of future loss is reduced.

FY 1999-FY 2000: N/A

Performance Results: FY 1999-FY2000: N/A

Indicator: Number of closed fiduciary investigations of employees' health and welfare plans where assets are restored, prohibited transactions are corrected, participant benefits are recovered, or plan assets are protected

Data Source: Enforcement Management Systems

Baseline: The number of investigations of employee health and welfare plans where prohibited transactions are corrected, assets are restored, participant benefits are recovered, or plan assets are protected for fiscal years 1999 and 2000 (332).

Comment: The protection of plan assets is the primary investigative purpose. When plan assets have been potentially endangered by an imprudent act on the part of a plan fiduciary or have otherwise been misused, DOL seeks to have the transaction corrected to minimize potential loss.











2.2A
Performance Goal: Unemployed workers receive fair UI benefit eligibility determinations and timely benefit payments.

Performance Results: FY 2000: This goal was substantially achieved.

23 States met or exceeded the minimum performance criterion for benefit adjudication quality (nationwide, 70.3% of all nonmonetary determinations were adequate.);

47 States met or exceeded the Secretary's Standard for intrastate payment timeliness (nationally, 89.9% of all intrastate first payments were made within 14/21 days).

FY 1999: N/A

Indicator: FY 2002:

Eligibility Determinations Fairness: Increase to 30 the number of States meeting or exceeding the minimum performance criterion for benefit adjudication quality;

Payment Timeliness: Increase to 49 the number of States meeting or exceeding the Secretary's Standard (minimum performance criterion) for intrastate payment timeliness.

FY 2001:

Eligibility Determinations Fairness: increase to 26 the number of States meeting or exceeding the minimum performance criterion for benefit adjudication quality; and

Payment Timeliness: Increase to 48 the number of States meeting or exceeding the Secretary's Standard (minimum performance criterion) for intrastate payment timeliness.

FY 2000:

Eligibility Determinations Fairness: Increase to 24 the number of States meeting or exceeding the minimum performance criterion for benefit adjudication quality; and

Payment Timeliness: Increase to 47 States the number of States meeting or exceeding the Secretary's Standard (minimum performance criterion) for intrastate payment timeliness.

FY 1999: N/A

Data Source: Eligibility Determinations Quality: ETA 9056; Payment timeliness:9050 Report

Baseline: Fiscal Year 1999:

Eligibility Determinations Fairness: 20 States met the minimum criterion that at least 75% of their determinations score over 80 points; nationally, 71% of all non-monetary adjudications scored >80 points using the standard review instrument.

Payment Timeliness: 46 States met the Secretary's Standard that at least 87% of intrastate lst payments were made within 14 days (in States with a waiting week) or 21 days (non-waiting week States). Nationally, 90% of intrastate payments were made within 14/21 days.

CommentThe ETA 9056 report is validated in two ways. The data entry software has edits for several elements. More importantly, two expert reviewers must agree on every rated element to ensure validity of the quality review of each determination. The ETA 9050 report is not now validated but the Department plans to validate it and most other key reports as part of the UI Data Validation system.











2.2B
Performance Goal: Promptly review applications for foreign labor certifications to ensure that aliens admitted to work under foreign labor certification will not adversely affect domestic workers' wages or working conditions.

Performance Results: FY 2000: N/A

FY 1999: N/A

Indicator: FY 2002: Establish a baseline for the average time required in the ETA's Regional Offices to process applications for permanent alien residency.

FY 1999-2001: N/A

Data Source: Regional Office Foreign Labor Certification data system, implemented in early FY 2001.

Baseline: To be established. Because there is no comparable baseline, these measures will be regularly reviewed for appropriateness and rigor as performance data becomes available.

Comment: At present, SESAs first process applications for permanent alien certification to ensure absence of adverse impact; ETA Regional Offices complete the review and then they go to INS. SESAs do not report processing times. Starting in FY 2001, Regional Offices will assume responsibility for the entire review of applications and forwarding the applications to INS. The new regional data system will enable tracking of processing times and age of unprocessed cases.











2.2C
Performance Goal: FY 2002: Increase by 2% (to $67 million) benefit recoveries achieved through the assistance of Pension Benefit Advisors.

FY 2001: Increase by 2% (to $66 million) benefit recoveries achieved through the assistance of Benefit Advisors.

FY 2000: Increase by 2% (to $53 million) benefit recoveries achieved through the assistance of Benefit Advisors.

FY 1999: N/A

Performance Results: FY 2000: The goal was achieved. The Department recovered $67 million as a result of participant assistance.

FY 1999: N/A

Indicator: The dollar value of benefit recoveries achieved through the assistance of technical assistance staff

Data Source: The Technical Assistance and Inquiries System

Baseline: Average of the benefit recoveries achieved in Fiscal Years 1999 and 2000 ($64.5 million)

Comment: Represents the amount of dollars returned to participants via the intervention of Benefit Advisers.











2.2D
Performance Goal: FY 2002: Increase by 1% the number of workers who are covered by a pension plan sponsored by their employer, particularly women, minorities and workers in small businesses.

FY 1999-FY 2001: Same as FY 2002.

Performance Results: FY 2000: The goal was achieved. The number of workers increased by 2% (From 46.6 million to 48.3 million).

FY 1999: The goal was achieved. The number of workers increased by 5% (From 45.1 million to 47.6 million)

Indicator: The number of active workers within the categories that report participation in a proper pension plan sponsored by their current employer

Data Source: Income Supplement of the Current Population Survey, U.S. Bureau of Census

Baseline: Estimated covered population derived from 1998 pension topical module--45.1 million.

Comment: The expansion of coverage within the private employer-sponsored pension system is one of the primary results goals toward which PWBA's programs and policy initiatives are directed. Providing access to populations that have historically shown a lower coverage rate is a high priority within this large goal. Coverage rates for specific populations can be tracked through specific sets of questions periodically included in surveys conducted by the Census Bureau. The Bureau provides statistically reliable data on pension coverage rates.











2.2E
Performance Goal: FY 2002: Return Federal employees to work following an injury as early as appropriate indicated by a 4% reduction from the FY 2000 baseline in the average number of production days lost due to disability.

FY 2001: Return Federal employees to work following an injury as early as appropriate indicated by a 2% reduction from the FY 2000 baseline in the average number of productions days lost due to disability.

FY 2000: Reduce to 173 days (QCM cases only). Establish baseline for all cases.

FY 1999: Return Federal employees to work following an injury as early as appropriate, as indicated by a 6% reduction from the baseline in production days lost due to disability for cases in the Quality Case Management (QCM) program. Reduce number of lost production days to 178 days (QCM cases only).

Performance Results: FY 2000: This goal was exceeded. Average lost production days (LPD) measured for Quality Case Management cases in FY 2000 was 164 days. A new LPD baseline representing all cases was established at 68.3 workdays.

FY 1999: This goal was exceeded. Average LPD for cases measured in FY 1999 was 173 days against a target of 178 days.

Indicator: Average number of days lost due to disability for all cases

Data Source: Federal Employees' Compensation Act (FECA) data systems; Federal agency payroll offices; Office of Personnel Management employment statistics.

Baseline: Baseline for Quality Case Management (QCM) cases only is the FY 1997 actual: 189 workdays. FY 2000 baseline: 68.3 workdays (revised by .2 workdays in 1st quarter FY2001 to reflect receipt of late data).

Comment: In FY 2000 DOL established a new baseline covering all Federal employee injuries.











2.2F
Performance Goal: FY 2002: Produce $122 million in cumulative first-year savings (FY 1999-FY 2002) in the FECA program through Periodic Roll Management.

FY 2001: Produce $95 million in cumulative first-year savings in the FECA Program through Periodic Roll Management.

FY 2000: Produce $66 million in first year savings through Periodic Roll Management.

FY 1999: Produce $19 million in first year savings through Periodic Roll Management.

Performance Results: FY 2000: This goal was exceeded. Cumulative first-year savings for FY 1999-2000 were $72 million.

FY 1999: This goal was exceeded. PRM case review actions produced an additional $20.8 million in FECA compensation benefit savings.

Indicator: The fiscal year amount of total periodic payment (compensation benefit) reductions in PRM universe cases

Data Source: Periodic Roll Management System; Automated Compensation Payment System

Baseline: For all cases with benefit actions in the measurement year, the periodic payment amount paid at time of their entry into the PRM universe, compared to the periodic payment amount after benefit reduction.

The methodology for measuring savings from compensation benefit adjustments and terminations was revised in FY 2000 to coincide with PRM's integration into permanent operations. PRM savings for performance reporting were previously derived by comparing total FECA program benefit reductions in all cases, including PRM cases, in the measurement year, to total reductions produced in the baseline year, but not counting PRM case reductions.

Comment: Periodic Roll Management has proven highly successful in identifying potential for return to work and resolving cases leading to greater savings in benefit compensation (an additional $317 million between 1992 and 1998). In FY 1999, Congress appropriated resources to fully staff all offices and integrate PRM into FECA program operations. This is accelerating savings in Federal workers' compensation costs, and increasing the potential for returning workers to employment after recovery from an injury. Note: Decisions on cases under PRM review often result in adjustment or termination of benefits. On a case-by-case basis, and beginning with the first payment cycle after the benefit action, savings are scored for the remainder of the measurement (fiscal) year, producing the first-year savings for the case. First-year savings for all cases in the measurement year are then combined producing the total first-year savings. The cumulative sum of first-year savings is matched against the goal as stated for each measurement year.











2.2G
Performance Goal: FY 2002: In the FECA program, reduce the overall average medical service cost per case (adjusted for inflation) by .5% versus the FY 2000 baseline. Reduce the average annual cost for physical therapy cases by .5% through focus reviews of services charged.

FY 2001: In the FECA program, reduce the average annual cost for physical therapy and psychiatric services cases by 1% through focus reviews of services charged. (Note: This intermediate goal will assist the agency in developing strategies to reach the overall cost reduction goal. Reduction of overall average medical costs will be measured against an FY 2000 baseline.)

FY 2000: In the FECA program, save an additional $5 million over FY 1999 compared to amounts charged through full-year implementation of fee schedules for inpatient hospital and pharmacy services; save $1.5 million compared to amounts charged for physician services through the Correct Coding Initiative.

FY 1999: Save 19% annually versus amounts billed for FECA medical services.

Performance Results: FY 2000: This goal was exceeded. The FECA program saved $34.5 million (61% over target) using fee schedules for Inpatient and Pharmacy services.

FY 1999: Both the original and revised goals were achieved.

Indicator: For Fee Schedules, Correct Coding Initiative, and Focus Reviews, savings are calculated by comparing amounts paid to amounts billed for drugs, hospital, and physician services in each performance year (e.g., paid versus billed in FY 2001).

Overall average case costs, after adjustment for inflation, for all cases receiving medical services.

Average case costs for services, adjusted for inflation and changes in industry practices, paid for selected medical conditions.

Data Source: FECA Medical Bill Pay System.

Baseline: Fee Schedule and Correct Coding Initiative Baselines: Amounts charged for medical services in each fiscal year that performance will be measured.

Fee Schedule Baseline: Amounts billed for drugs, hospital and physician services in the measurement year

Overall Average Medical Cost Baseline: Average annual cost per case in FY 2000 for all cases receiving medical services.

Selected Medical Services Average Cost Baseline: Average annual cost per case in FY 2000 for cases receiving medical services selected for review.

Comment: The FECA program uses Fee Schedules to set payment levels for standard categories of billed medical services. A special automated bill review, the Corrective Coding Initiative (CCI) identifies medical providers' duplicate and abusive billing practices, and facilitates evaluation and resolution of questionable bills before payment is authorized. Focus Reviews identify proper treatment or payments for selected medical services provided and matched to medical condition. These mechanisms, along with procedural changes and other quality controls, will result in overall reduction of program medical costs.











2.2H
Performance Goal: FY 2002: Reduce the average processing time to 3 years to send benefit determinations to participants in defined benefit pension plans taken over by PBGC.

FY 2001: Reduce processing time from 4-5 years to 3-4 years to send benefit determinations to participants in defined benefit pension plans taken over by PBGC.

FY 2000: Reduce processing time from 5-6 years to 4-5 years to send benefit determinations to participants in defined benefit pension plans taken over by PBGC.

FY 1999: N/A

Performance Results: FY 2000: This goal was achieved.

FY 1999: N/A

Indicator: Timeliness of benefit determinations to participants in trusteed plans

Data Source: Participant Record Information Management System

Baseline: FY 1997: 7 to 8 years

Comment: This measure addresses PBGC's largest operating functions which are processing terminated plans and paying benefits. Termination activities involve an intricate series of complex actions, from reviewing plan assets and participant data, to completing financial and control group analysis. Sponsor bankruptcies and legal disputes over plan assets also complicate and stretch out the trusteeship process. Total participant count in PBGC-trusteed plans will have increased to over 500,000 in FY 2002, while trusteed plans will have increased to about 3,000.

Ultimately, faster case processing leads to increased accuracy of benefit payments.











2.3A
Performance Goal: Increase the employment, retention, and earnings replacement of individuals registered under the WIA dislocated worker program.

Performance Results: PY 2000: N/A

PY 1999: N/A

Indicator: PY 2002:

  • 75% will be employed in the first quarter after program exit.
  • 85% of those employed in the first quarter after program exit will be employed in the third quarter after program exit; and
  • Those who are employed in the first quarter after program exit and are still employed in the third quarter after program exit will have 92% of their pre-dislocation earnings.

PY 2001:

  • 73% will be employed in the first quarter after program exit.
  • 3% of those employed in the first quarter after program exit will be employed in the third quarter after program exit; and
  • Those who are employed in the first quarter after program exit and are still employed in the third quarter after program exit will have 91% of their pre-dislocation earnings.

PY 2000:

  • 71% will be employed in the first quarter after program exit.
  • 82% of those employed in the first quarter after program exit will be employed in the third quarter after program exit; and
  • Those who are employed in the first quarter after program exit and are still employed in the third quarter after program exit will have 90% of their pre-dislocation earnings.

PY 1999: N/A

Data Source:Workforce Investment Act Standardized Record Data (WIASRD) included in the Enterprise Information Management System (EIMS); UI Wage Records

Baseline: There is no prior experience with these WIA indicators, which are based on the use of UI wage records. PY 2000, the first full year of WIA implementation, will constitute the baseline year for this measure. The performance measure is derived from the agreed upon levels of performance for all States. Because there is no comparable baseline, these measures will be regularly reviewed for appropriateness and rigor as performance data becomes available.

Comment: The current FY 1999-2004 Strategic Plan includes the new WIA goal based upon a weighted average of negotiated levels of performance for all States. The goals for PY 2000, PY 2001 and PY 2002 stated in this plan also reflect these negotiated levels for all States.











2.3B
Performance Goal: Increase the employment, retention, and earnings replacement of workers dislocated in important part because of trade and who receive trade adjustment assistance benefits.

Performance Results: FY 2000: N/A

FY 1999: N/A

Indicator: FY 2002:

  • 75% will be employed in the first quarter after program exit;
  • 85% of those employed in the first quarter after program exit will be employed in the third quarter after program exit; and
  • Those who are employed in the third quarter after program exit will earn, on average, 85% of their pre-separation earnings.

FY 2001:

  • 73% will be employed in the first quarter after program exit;
  • 80% of those employed in the first quarter after program exit will be employed in the third quarter after program exit; and
  • Those who are employed in the first quarter after program exit and are still employed in the third quarter after program exit will earn, on average, 82% of their pre-separation earnings.

FY 1999-FY 2000: N/A

Data Source: TAPR (Trade Act Participant Report) included in the Enterprise Information Management System (EIMS)

Baseline: New Goal. FY 2001 will constitute the baseline year for this measure. Because there is no comparable baseline, these measures will be regularly reviewed for appropriateness and rigor as performance data becomes available.

Comment: Beginning in FY 2001, the TAA/NAFTA program's performance measures were revised to conform to WIA and align more closely with the dislocated worker goals.











3.1A
Performance Goal: FY 2002: Reduce the number of mine fatalities and non-fatal injury rate to below the average for the previous five years

FY 1999-FY 2001: Reduce the number of mine fatalities and the non-fatal injury rate to below the average for the previous five years.

PerformanceResults: FY 2000: The goal was substantially achieved.

  • Fatalities: Average FY 1995-1999 = 89; FY 2000 = 89
  • Nonfatal-days-lost incidence rate: Average FY 1995-1999 =3.83; FY 2000 = 3.45

FY 1999: The goal was achieved.

  • Fatalities: FY 1994-1998 Average = 92; FY 1999 = 82*
  • Nonfatal-days-lost incidence rate: FY 1994-1998 Average = 4.07; FY 1999 = 3.51*

Indicator: Coal and metal/nonmetal mine fatalities: Coal and Metal and Nonmetal mine industry nonfatal-days-lost incidence rate

Data Source: Mine Accident, Injury, Illness, Employment, and Coal Production System (30 Code of Federal Regulations Part 50 System)

Baseline: 89 average fatalities for FY 1995-1999 (five-year average); 3.83. average nonfatal-days-lost incidence rate for FY 1995-1999

Comment: A five-year moving average is used to reduce irregular fluctuations in order to highlight trends in the performance measure.

*These figures will not necessarily match those reported in the FY 2000 Annual Performance Report, since they reflect more current data.











3.1B
Performance Goal: FY 2002: Reduce by 5% the percentage of coal dust and silica dust samples that are out of compliance for coal mines and metal and nonmetal high risk mining occupations, respectively.

FY 1999-2001: Same as FY 2002.

Performance Results: FY 2000: The goal was achieved.

  • Coal dust goal: 5% reduction; Target: 11.7%; actual: 11.2% reduction
  • Silica dust goal: < 85 index points; actual: 65.3 index points

FY 1999: The goal was achieved.

  • Coal dust goal: 5% reduction; actual: 11.6% reduction
  • Silica dust goal <90 index points; actual: 75.1 index points.

Indicator: Compliance with the permissible level for coal mine dust and metal/nonmetal silica.

Data Source: Coal Mine Safety and Health Management Information System and Metal and Nonmetal Mine Safety and Health Management Information System

Baseline: Coal dust baseline: 13% not in compliance in FY 1998 based on 3,773 inspector samples.

Metal and Nonmetal silica baseline set at 100 index points (1997-1998 data); FY 2000 target at 85 index points.

Comment: Respirable dust is one of the three major health hazards to miners. Prevention of pneumoconiosis (black lung disease) and silicosis is a priority health initiative.











3.1C
Performance Goal: FY 2002: Reduce three of the most significant types of workplace injuries and causes of illnesses by 15%.

FY 2001: Reduce three of the most significant types of workplace injuries and causes of illnesses by 11% [from baseline].

FY 2000: Reduce three of the most significant types of workplace injuries and causes of illnesses by 7% [from baseline].

FY 1999: Reduce three of the most prevalent workplace injuries and causes of illnesses by 3% in selected industries and occupations.

Performance Results: FY 2000: The goal was achieved.

  • Silica: Decreased by 59%
  • Lead: Decreased by 36%
  • Amputations: Decreased by 19% (CY 1997-1999)*

FY 1999: The goal was achieved.

  • Silica: Decreased by 70%
  • Lead: Decreased by 48%
  • Amputations: Decreased by 17% (CY 1996-1998)

Indicator: Silica: Percent change in average silica exposure severity**

Lead: Percent change in average lead exposure severity**

Amputations: Percent change in rate of amputations

Data Source: OSHA Integrated Management Information System (IMIS) (Silica and Lead)

Bureau of Labor Statistics Annual Survey of Occupational Injuries and Illnesses (Amputations)

Baseline: Silica: 9.4 average silica exposure severity (IMIS) FY 1996)

Lead: 4.8 average lead exposure severity (IMIS) FY 1995)

Amputations: 1.45 per 10,000 employees for CY 1993-1995

Comment: Silica: OSHA will measure average silica exposure severity in establishments where OSHA has silica-related interventions.

Lead: OSHA will measure average lead exposure severity in establishments where OSHA has lead-related interventions.

Amputation: A three-year moving average is used to reduce fluctuations in order to highlight trends in the performance measures.

* CY 2000 BLS Annual Survey of Occupational Injury and Illness characteristic data for amputations will be available in April 2002.

** Average exposure severity calculated by averaging the exposures measured for each inspection, then taking the average for all inspections.











3.1D
Performance Goal: FY 2002: Reduce injuries and illnesses by 15% in five industries characterized by high-hazard workplaces.

FY 2001: Reduce injuries/illnesses by 11% [from baseline] in five industries characterized by high-hazard workplaces.

FY 2000: Reduce injuries and illnesses by 7% [from baseline] in five industries characterized by high-hazard workplaces.

FY 1999: Reduce injuries and illnesses by 3% in five industries characterized by high-hazard workplaces.

Performance Results: FY 2000 data will be available December 2001.

FY 1999: The goal was achieved.

  • Shipyard industry: Decreased by 28%*
  • Food processing industry: Decreased by 15%*
  • Nursing home industry: Decreased by 6%*
  • Logging industry: Decreased by 26%*
  • Construction industry: Decreased by 19%*

Indicator: Shipyard, food processing, nursing homes and logging: Percent change in lost workday injury/illness (LWDII) rates in industries per 100 full-time workers

Construction: Percent change in lost workday injury rate per 100 full-time workers in the construction industry

Data Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics Annual Survey of Occupational Injuries and Illnesses

Baseline: Shipyard: 13.4 average lost workday injury and illness rate per 100 full-time workers for CY 1993-1995

Nursing homes: 8.7 average lost workday injury and illness rate per 100 full-time workers for CY 1993-1995

Food processing: 8.9 average lost workday injury and illness rate per 100 full-time workers for CY 1993-1995

Logging: 7.2 average lost workday injury and illness rate per 100 full-time workers for CY 1993-1995

Construction: 5.2 average lost workday injury rate per 100 full-time workers for CY 1993-1995

Comment: A three-year moving average is used to reduce fluctuations in order to highlight trends in the performance measures.

* CY 1997-1999 BLS data.

CY 2000 BLS lost workday injury and illness rate data will be available in December 2001.











3.1E
Performance Goal: FY 2002: Reduce injuries and illnesses (LWDII) by 20% in at least 100,000 workplaces where OSHA initiates an intervention.

FY 2001: Reduce injuries and illnesses (LWDII) by 20% in at least 75,000 workplaces where an intervention is initiated.

FY 2000: Reduce injuries and illnesses (LWDII) by 20% in at least 50,000 workplaces where the agency initiates an intervention.

FY 1999: Reduce injuries and illnesses (LWDII) by 20% in at least 25,000 workplaces where the agency initiates an intervention.

Performance Results: FY 2000: The goal was achieved. Lost workday injury and illness (LWDII) rates were reduced by 20% in 67,900 workplaces.**

FY 1999: The goal was achieved. Lost workday injury and illness (LWDII) rates were reduced in 50,100 workplaces.*

Indicator: The number of workplaces where OSHA intervened and (LWDII) rates were reduced by 20%

Data Source: OSHA Data Initiative (ODI)

OSHA Integrated Management Information System (IMIS)

Bureau of Labor Statistics Annual Survey of Occupational Injuries and Illnesses

Baseline: Will vary depending on when the intervention occurs; tracking began with FY 1995 interventions

Comment: * Results based on an analysis conducted by researchers from the University of Pittsburgh and Clark University.

** Results based on an analysis conducted by a researcher from Clark University.











3.1F
Performance Goal: FY 2002: Decrease fatalities in the construction industry by 15%, by focusing on the four leading causes of fatalities (falls, struck-by, crushed-by, and electrocutions and electrical injuries)

FY 2001: Decrease fatalities in the construction industry by 11% [from baseline], by focusing on the four leading causes of fatalities (falls, struck-by, crushed-by, and electrocutions and electrical injuries).

FY 2000: Decrease fatalities in the construction industry by 7%, [from baseline] by focusing on the four leading causes of fatalities (falls, struck-by, crushed-by, and electrocutions and electrical injuries).

FY 1999: Decrease fatalities in the construction industry by 3%, by focusing on the four leading causes of fatalities (falls, struck-by, crushed-by, and electrocutions and electrical injuries).

Performance Results: FY 2000 data will be available August 2001.*

FY 1999: The goal was not met. Fatalities were decreased by 2% (CY 1997-1999).

Indicator: Percent change in the rate of fatalities

Data Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries

Baseline: Rate of fatal occupational injuries: 14.5 per 100,000 workers for CY 1993-1995

Comment: A three-year moving average is used to reduce fluctuations in order to highlight trends in the performance measures.

CY 2000 BLS Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries data will be available in August 2001.











3.1G
Performance Goal: FY 2002: Reduce injuries and illnesses by 15% at work sites engaged in voluntary, cooperative relationships with DOL

FY 2001: Same as FY 2002.

FY 1999-2000: N/A

Performance Results: FY 2000: N/A

FY 1999: N/A

Indicator: The percent change in injury and illness rates at work sites engaged in voluntary, cooperative relationships with DOL

Data Source: Special study

Baseline: The year prior to the voluntary cooperative relationship with DOL .

Comment: This is a new performance goal (FY 1999/2000 Strategic Plan revision).











3.2A
Performance Goal: FY 2002: Federal contractors achieve equal opportunity workplaces as demonstrated by:

  • Improving the equal employment opportunity performance of federal contractors and subcontractors within industries where data indicate the likelihood of equal employment opportunity problems is greatest. In FY 2002, achieve __% improvement over the FY 2001 established baselines;
  • Improving the equal employment opportunity performance of federal contractors and subcontractors that have had prior contact with OFCCP through evaluations, outreach, or technical assistance. In FY 2002, achieve __% improvement over the FY 2001 established baselines; and,
  • Reducing compensation discrimination by federal contractors and subcontractors. In FY 2002, achieve __% improvement over the FY 2001 established baselines.

FY 2001: Identify those industries where data indicate the likelihood of equal employment opportunity problems is greatest and establish baselines; establish baselines for contractors and subcontractors that have had prior contact with ESA/OFCCP through evaluations, outreach or technical assistance; and establish baselines for reducing compensation discrimination by federal contractors and subcontractors.

FY 2000: Increase by 5% over the FY 1999 baseline the number of Federal contractors brought into compliance with the Equal Employment Opportunity (EEO) provisions of Federal contracts via OFCCP's compliance evaluation procedures.

FY 1999: Increase by 5% over the FY 1998 baseline the number of Federal contractors brought into compliance with the EEO provisions of Federal contracts via ESA's compliance evaluation procedures.

Performance Results: FY 2000: The goal was fully achieved. The Department brought 3,353 contractors into compliance, an increase of 27 percent over FY 1999 performance.

FY 1999: This goal was not achieved.

Indicator: Trends/changes in compliance and violation rates and EEO-1 data. Trends/Changes in compensation and other data gathered from evaluations and from Federal contractors. Trends/changes in data gathered from customer satisfaction surveys.

Data Source: EEO-1 data file; Case Management System; Federal contractors' data; customer satisfaction survey; compliance reviews within industries.

Baseline: Baselines will be established by the end of FY 2001.

Comment: Revisions to the goal have been made for FY 2001 to more comprehensively measure the Department's mission and the effectiveness of our efforts in the EEO arena.











3.2B
Performance Goal: FY 2002: States that receive DOL financial assistance under the Workforce Investment Act provide benefits and services in a nondiscriminatory manner as evidenced by:

  • Their timely submission of Methods of Administration which demonstrate how their programs and activities are operated in a nondiscriminatory manner, or in the absence of timely submissions, the issuance of a "Show Cause Notice" within 15 days of a non-timely submission ; and
  • The issuance, within 180 days of the submission of the MOA, of a determination or a conciliation agreement which indicates that the MOA gives reasonable guarantee that benefits and services are provided in a nondiscriminatory manner.

FY 2001: All DOL national and State level programs financially assisted under the Workforce Investment Act (WIA) are in compliance with all applicable civil rights laws and regulations.

FY 2000: Within 180 days of submission of State Methods of Administration (MOAs), States are in compliance with the non-discrimination provisions of Section 188 of the Workforce Investment Act (WIA) and 29 CFR Part 37.

FY 1999: Issue final regulations implementing the nondiscrimination provisions of Section 188 of WIA by August 7, 1999.

Performance Results: FY 2000: Deferred until FY 2001

FY 1999: The goal was not met.

Indicator:

  • Number of MOAs due during FY
  • Number of MOAs timely submitted
  • Number of compliance determinations issued within 180 days.
  • Number of conciliation agreements issued within 180 days.
  • Number of Show Cause Notices issued within 15 days.

Data Source: Methods of Administration Agreement signed by States, Show Cause Notices, Compliance Determinations, and Conciliation Agreements.

Baseline: FY 2001: 30 ETA approved State plans.

FY 2000: 53 state administered programs, 4 national programs

Comment: MOAs detail how each State will implement the nondiscrimination and equal opportunity provisions of WIA. MOAs are due 180 days after ETA gives final approval to a States's five-year WIA Strategic Plan. Noncompliance with MOA requirements can result in the withdrawal of grant funds.











3.3A
Performance Goal: Increase employment and access to quality child care by increasing the number of registered child care apprenticeship programs and the number of newly registered child care apprentices.

Performance Results: FY 2000: The goal was achieved. The number of States with child care apprenticeship programs increased from 29 to 39. The number of newly registered child care apprentices increased from 202 in FY 1999 to 700 in FY 2000, significantly exceeding the targeted 15% increase.

FY 1999: The goal was achieved.

Indicator: FY 2002:

  • 49 States will have registered child care apprenticeship programs; and
  • The number of newly registered child care apprentices will increase by 25% over the FY 1999 baseline.

FY 2001:

  • 49 States will have registered child care apprenticeship programs; and
  • The number of new child care apprentices will increase by 20% over the FY 1999 baseline.

FY 2000:

  • 39 States will have registered child care apprenticeship programs; and
  • The number of new child care apprentices will increase by 15% over the FY 1999 baseline.

FY 1999:

  • 29 States will have registered child care apprenticeship programs; and
  • The number of new child care apprentices will increase by 10% (to at least 2,114).

Data Source: Apprenticeship Information Management System (AIMS)

Baseline: At the end of FY 1999, 29 States had child care apprenticeship programs. In FY 1999, the number of child care apprentices increased from 1,914 to 2,116 (202 new apprentices).

Comment:











3.4A
Performance Goal: FY 2002: Reduce exploitative child labor by promoting international efforts and targeting focused initiatives in selected countries.

FY 2001: Reduce exploitative child labor worldwide by increasing international support and funding the most promising programs and projects in targeted countries.

FY 2000: Same as 2001.

FY 1999: N/A

Performance Results: FY 2000: The goal was achieved as reflected in the following supporting indicators:

1. Increase number of countries ratifying International Labor Organization (ILO) Convention 182 on the Worst Forms of Child Labor.

Result: A total of 37 countries(36 in FY 2000) ratified ILO Convention 182 on the Worst Forms of Child Labor. This Convention was unanimously adopted by the delegates to the International Labor Conference in June 1999.

2. Increase number of IPEC National Action Plans.

Result: DOL funded two additional IPEC National Action Plans in FY2000--one in South Africa and the other in Yemen.

3. Increase awareness through reports, other publications, and website on exploitative child labor disseminated by ILAB.

Result:

• ILAB published its sixth report on international child labor, By the Sweat & Toil of Children: An Economic Consideration of Child Labor.

• ILAB's International Child Labor Program's website provides information on child labor issues. ICLP receives numerous questions and requests for information from the public via email.

• ILAB funded a Global Campaign/Best Practices Conference to help raise awareness about child labor. This conference provided speakers from Africa, Asia, and Latin America with an opportunity to share their experiences in working to address child labor issues.

4. 50,000 children targeted for prevention and removal from exploitative work.

Result: In FY2000, ILAB targeted over 100,000 children for prevention and/or removal from exploitative work.

FY 1999: N/A

Indicator:

  • 8 countries will ratify International Labor Organization (ILO) Convention 182 on Worst Forms of Child Labor.
  • 7 countries will establish National Action Plans.
  • 100,000 children in developing countries will be targeted for prevention and/or removal from exploitative work and placed in educational settings.
  • 50,000 children in developing countries will be prevented and/or removed from exploitative work.

5. 70% of children removed from child labor will be placed in educational settings.

6. Establish baseline for a rate of retention for children placed in educational settings.

Data Source: ILO-IPEC and DOL/ILAB

Baseline: Baseline is zero for all indicators.

In the Spring of 2000, ILAB published its sixth child labor report in the By the Sweat & Toil of Children series. This report focuses on the possible economic benefits that could be realized from withdrawing children from exploitative work and enrolling these children in school.

The ILO's Statistical Information and Monitoring Program (SIMPOC) is currently assisting countries in generating statistical data on child labor at the national level that would more accurately assess the extent and nature of the global child labor problem. More than 40 SIMPOC surveys are scheduled to be conducted through 2000 and 2001. In the meantime, baseline information collected through the IPEC projects will be used to establish target populations and measure future progress.

Comment: Throughout the 1990s, increased international recognition of the child labor problem and action to address it have been increasing. While there is still a high incidence of child labor in many developing countries, many governmental and non-governmental organizations are taking steps to remove children from exploitative work. This increased commitment to the eradication of child labor is evident by the unanimous adoption of the ILO Convention on the Worst Forms of Child Labor in Geneva in June 1999.

ILAB is working to establish better survey data and to document the extent and nature of child labor through the ILO's SIMPOC program. Achievement of this performance goal depends upon other countries agreeing to establish and implement IPEC projects to be funded by ILAB. Projects funded in FY 2000 in some instances may not have impact until FY 2001.











3.4B
Performance Goal: FY 2002: Advance workers' protections and economic status in developing countries.

FY 2001: Raise workers' protection and the safety of work places in selected countries by improving core labor standards and social safety net programs.

1. 15 countries receive US financial support and commit to core labor standards.

2. Two initiatives to effect policy changes in other Nations will yield judicial, legal, or significant policy decisions which improve core labor standards.

3. Eight project countries commit with USA/DOL assistance make substantive improvements in social safety programs that protect workers and develop labor markets.

FY 2000: Raise workers' protection and the safety of work places in selected countries by improving core labor standards and social safety net programs.

  • Eight USDOL project countries commit to undertake improvements in assuring compliance and implementation of core labor standards in USDOL project countries which have accepted financial support from U.S.A./DOL.
  • Number of judicial and legal decisions which improve core labor standards and workplace safety standards.
  • Four project countries commit to undertake improvements in social safety nets funded by U.S.A./DOL, which may include labor market information systems; unemployment insurance/social security systems; employment creation, training/retraining and placement programs; occupational safety and health including the mining sector; workforce development initiatives for vulnerable groups.
  • Number of countries that improve social safety programs that protect workers and develop labor markets.

FY 1999: N/A

Performance Results: FY 2000: The goal was substantially achieved. Three of four performance indicators were met or surpassed; one indicator was not achieved. Results are reported after each indicator below.

1. Eight USDOL project countries will commit to undertake improvements in assuring compliance and implementation of core labor standards in USDOL project countries which have accepted financial support from U.S.A./DOL in USDOL project countries which have accepted financial support from DOL.

Result: A total of 12 projects in 35 countries to improve the protection of workers' basic rights were established

2. Four project countries commit to undertake improvements in social safety nets funded by U.S.A./DOL, which may include labor market information systems; unemployment insurance/social security systems; employment creation, training/retraining and placement programs; occupational safety and health including the mining sector; workforce development initiatives for vulnerable groups

Result: A total of 11 projects to economically empower workers were implemented in 34 countries

3. Number of countries that improve social safety programs that protect workers and develop markets.

Result: Projects in target countries were not funded until September 2000.

4. Number of judicial and legal decisions which improve core labor standards and workplace safety standards.

Result: In Mexico core labor standards have been improved with these actions: The Mexican Department of Labor signed a Joint Declaration with the United States and Canada, committing to promote that workers be provided information pertaining to collective bargaining agreements existing in their place of employment and to promote the use of eligible voters lists and secret ballot elections in disputes over the right to administer the collective bargaining contract.

FY 1999: N/A

Indicator:

  • 7 countries commit to undertake improvements in assuring compliance and implementation of core labor standards.
  • 6 project countries will commit with US/DOL assistance to make substantive improvements in raising income levels of working families.

Data Source: ILO Reports; reports by government and nongovernmental organizations

Baseline: Current level of implementation

Comment: Multilateral and Bilateral technical assistance programs are being launched in FY 2000 with new funds. Consequently, outcomes are not anticipated to be realized until FY 2001, following a number of key project interventions. Other countries may not share U.S. priorities in determining agendas.











FM1
Performance Goal: FY 2002: All DOL financial systems meet the standards set in the Federal Financial Management Improvement Act (FFMIA) and the Government Management Reform Act (GMRA).

FY 2001: Same as FY 2002.

FY 2000: All of DOL financial systems meet the standards or have prepared corrective action plans to meet the standard by FY 2000.

FY 1999: DOL financial systems and procedures either meet the "substantial compliance" standard as prescribed in the Federal Financial Management Improvement Act (FFMIA) or corrective actions are scheduled to promptly correct material weaknesses identified.

Performance Results: FY 2000: The goal was substantially achieved.

FY 1999: The goal was achieved.

Indicator: Percentage of financial systems compliant with the Acts

Data Source: OIG audit opinion in Accountability Report to be issued in March 2002

Baseline: FY 1997: 8 of 14 systems in compliance (57%) ; FY 1998: 9 of 14 systems in compliance (64%); FY 1999: 17 of 22 (77%) systems in compliance; FY 2000: 15 of 17 (88%) systems in compliance.

Comment:











FM2
Performance Goal: FY 2002: DOL meets all new accounting standards issued by the Federal Accounting Systems Advisory Board (FASAB) including the Managerial Cost Accounting Standard.

FY 2001: Same as FY 2002.

FY 2000: DOL meets all current FASAB standards

FY 1999: N/A

Performance Results: FY 2000: The goal was achieved.

FY 1999: N/A

Indicator: Percentage of accounting standards met

Data Source: OIG audit opinion in Accountability Report to be issued in March 2002

Baseline: The standard has been met in each year since FY 1997.

Comment:











IT1
Performance Goals: FY 2002: Improve automated access to administrative and program systems, services andinformation.

FY 2000-2001: Increase integration of DOL IT systems and extend access to automated services

FY1999: N/A

Performance Results: FY 2000: This goal was achieved.

FY 1999: N/A

Indicator:

  • Common office automation suite of software DOL-wide (ITC)
  • The Remote Terminal Network (RTN) replaced (ITC)
  • New automated time and attendance and payroll systems operational Department-wide (PP2K).
  • Establish baseline for LaborNet customer satisfaction using an on-line survey.
  • Implement 15 DOL Public Web Site topical and client-targeted web interfaces. (ASP)
  • Increase the number of DOL Public Web Site users by 5%. (ASP)
  • Reduce the number of page hits users must traverse to obtain the information they seek by 5%. (ASP)
  • Improve the user satisfaction results from the Internet Customer Satisfaction Survey to average score of 3 or better. (ASP)

Data Sources: a) Agency reports.

  • Network inventory monitoring.
  • Time and Attendance (T&A) and Payroll transactions.
  • Results of on-line Customer Satisfaction Survey.
  • Progress reports to the IMG.
  • Webtrends Usage Reports.
  • Webtrends Usage Reports.
  • Internet Customer Satisfaction Survey Results.

Baseline:

  • FY 2001: DOL does not have a common office automation suite of software DOL-wide.
  • FY 2001: The RTN is fully operational.
  • FY 2001: ATA and legacy payroll systems in use.
  • FY2002: LaborNet customer satisfaction baseline to be established.
  • FY2000: Zero topical and client-targeted web interfaces.
  • FY2000: Average monthly user sessions: 2,732,919,

Average monthly page hits: 14, 366,961.

  • FY 2001: Baseline to be established.
  • FY 2000: Average customer satisfaction usability results: 4.05

(Scale: 1=Exactly, 5=Not At All)

Comment:











HR1
Performance Goal: FY 2002: The right people are in the right place at the right time to carry out the mission of the Department.

a) A prepared and competent workforce

b) A diverse workforce

c) Compliance with merit system principals

FY 2001: N/A

FY 2000: N/A

Performance Results: FY 2000: N/A

Indicators: a1) Extent of satisfaction by selecting officials with the quality of applicants referred for their vacancies.

a2) Extent of agreement by program managers that their workforce enables their program to meet its mission.

b1) Extent of satisfaction of selection officials with the diversity of the applicants referred for their vacancies.

b2) Extent to which diversity in the DOL workforce reflects the civilian labor force.

c1) Percent of vacancy announcements that meet regulatory requirements.

c2) Extent to which DOL employees agree that personnel actions are carried out in accordance with merit system principles.

Data Sources: a1) Survey of selecting officials.

a2) Survey of program managers.

b1) Survey of selecting officials.

b2) Data on overall DOL representation rates for the six protected groups.

c1) Accountability review (several DOL agencies are reviewed each year).

c2) DOL survey or MSPB/OPM survey.

Baseline: a1) To be established in 2001

a2) To be established in 2001

b1) To be established in 2001

b2) 2000 data

c1) To be established in 2001

c2) To be established in 2001, or use 2000 MSPB/OPM survey results

Comment: The following factors may affect the ability to attain the above goal: DOL's budget; changes in recruitment and hiring procedures; introduction of new recruitment flexibilities; computer access to programs and services to all DOL employees.











HR2
Performance Goal: FY 2002: Reduce the rate of lost production days by two percent (i.e., number of days employees spend away from work due to injuries and illnesses).

FY 2001: Reduce the rate of lost production days by 3.5 percent (i.e., number of days employees spend away from work due to injuries and illnesses).

FY 2000: Reduce the rate of lost production days by two percent (i.e., number of days employees spend away from work due to injuries and illnesses).

FY 1999: N/A

Performance Results: FY 2000: This goal was not achieved. The rate of lost production days was reduced by .05 percent to 57.1 days per 100 employees.

FY 1999: N/A

Indicator: Percent decrease in rate of lost production days (target is 2%)

Data Source: OWCP Table 2 Reports and personnel data from DOL's Office of Budget.

OWCP Charge Back System data.

Baseline: Initial baseline for lost production days was officially set by OWCP at 56 days per 100 employees in FY 2001 (based on FY 2000 data).

Comment: Factors that will influence achieving the above goal: ability of the Safety and Health Center to fill currently vacant staff positions; progress in achieving the FY 2001 goals; and successful implementation of the new system for filing and tracking of injury/illness reports.











HR3
Performance Goal: FY 2002: Reduce the overall occurrence of injuries and illnesses for DOL employees by 3 percent, and improve the timeliness of filing injury/illness claims by 5 percent.

FY 2001: Same as FY 2002

FY 2000: Reduce the overall occurrence of injuries of DOL employees by three percent. Improve the timeliness of filing injury claim forms by five percent.

FY 1999: N/A

Performance Results: FY 2000: Results for this goal have changed. The Annual Report indicated that this goal (3.6 cases per 100 employees) had not been achieved. More current and accurate data indicates that this goal was achieved and the FY 2000 injury and illness rate was 3.50 cases per 100 employees, a reduction of 5.7%. The Department also significantly improved the timeliness of filing injury claims, improving to 57.3% from the previous baseline of 47.4%.

FY 1999: N/A

Indicator: a) Percent decrease in total case rate of illnesses, accidents, & injuries (target is 3%).

b) Increase in timeliness of reporting new injuries (target is 5%).

Data Source: OWCP time-lag reports for federal agencies for submission of claims forms CA-1

and CA-2 within 10 working days or 14 calendar days.

OWCP Table 2 Reports and personnel data from DOL's Office of Budget.

Baseline: a) Initial baseline for timeliness of filing is 47.4% based on 1998 data. Initial baseline injury and illness rate is 3.71 cases per 100 employees based on 1997 data.

Comment: Preliminary data indicated that DOL's injury and illness rate had increased in FY 2000. As a result, DOL reported that this goal had not been achieved and accelerated its reduction to 5% in FY 2001 to assist in achieving the Initiative's overall 5-year goal. More current and accurate data indicates that this goal was achieved (3.50 cases per 100 employees). As a result, DOL's FY 2001 goal has reverted to the Initiative's original 3% reduction (3.49 cases per 100 employees). DOL exceeded the timeliness of filing goal in FY 2000 (57.3%) and has implemented a stretch goal of 65% in FY 2001. Factors that will influence achieving the above goals: ability of the Safety and Health Center to fill currently vacant staff positions; progress in achieving the FY 2001 goals; and successful implementation of the new system for filing and tracking of injury/illness reports.











PR1
Performance Goal: FY 2002: Complete public-private or direct conversion competitions on not less than the five percent of the FTE listed on the DOL's Federal Activities Inventory Reform Act (FAIR) listings.

FY 2001: N/A

FY 2000: N/A

Performance Results: N/A

Indicator: Percentage of commercial competitive or commercial exempt FTE on the Department's FAIR inventory included in completed competitions or direct conversions.

Data Sources: DOL Federal Activities Inventory Reform Act inventory.

Completed A-76 competitions.

Completed direct conversion competitions for DOL commercial exempt FTE.

Baseline: FY 2001 FTE listings.

Comment: During the remainder of FY 2001 DOL will: (a) assess and verify the accuracy of the Department's current system for conducting FAIR Act inventories; (b) provide recommendations for changes in how DOL inventories are conducted; (c) where changes are needed, develop and implement a DOL wide implementation plan; (d) validate and refine the system as needed.











Outcome Goal 1.1
ETA

Training and Employment Services
0174-0-1-504

01 Adult employment and training activities
03 Dislocated worker employment and training activities
10 Native Americans
11 Migrant and seasonal farm workers
13 National programs

Welfare to Work
0177-0-1-504

01 Formula grants
02 Competitive grants

Community Service Employment for Older Americans
0175-0-1-504

01 National programs
02 State programs

Employment Service
0179-0-1-999

10 Grants to States
11 National activities
12 One-stop centers
13 Work Incentive assistance grants

Program Administration
0172-0-1-504

01 Adult services
03 Workforce security
04 Apprenticeship training, employer and labor services
05 Executive Direction
06 Welfare to Work

VETS
Veterans Employment and Training
0164-0-1-702

01 Disabled veterans outreach program
02 Local veterans employment representatives
03 Administration
04 National Veterans Training Institute
05 Homeless veterans program
06 Veterans workforce investment program

Office of the Inspector General
0106-0-1-505

01 Program activities
02 Executive direction and management

Departmental Management
0165-0-1-505

01 Program direction and support
02 Legal services
04 Administration and management
07 Women's Bureau
09 Chief Financial Officer

Office of Disability Employment Policy
0166-0-1-505

01 Office of Disability Employment Policy
02 President's Taskforce on Employment of Adults with Disabilities











Outcome Goal 1.2

ETA
Training and Employment Services

0174-0-1-504

05 Youth activities
06 Youth opportunity grants
07 Job Corp
08 Responsible reintegration for youth offenders
13 National programs
14 Expired programs

Employment Service
0179-0-1-999

10 Grants to States
11 National activities

Program Administration
0172-0-1-504

02 Youth services
05 Executive Direction

Office of the Inspector General
0106-0-1-505

01 Program activities
02 Executive direction and management

Departmental Management
0165-0-1-505

01 Program direction and support
02 Legal services
04 Administration and management
09 Chief Financial Officer











Outcome Goal 1.3

BLS
0200-0-1-505

01 Labor force statistics
02 Prices and living conditions
03 Compensation and working conditions
04 Productivity and technology
06 Executive direction and staff services
07 Consumer Price Index
9.01 Reimbursable program

Office of the Inspector General
0106-0-1-505

01 Program activities
02 Executive direction and management

Departmental Management
0165-0-1-505

01 Program direction and support (ASP)
04 Administration and management
09 Chief Financial Officer

Office of Disability Employment Policy
0166-0-1-505

01 Office of Disability Employment Policy
02 President's Taskforce on Employment of Adults with Disabilities











Outcome Goal 2.1

PWBA
1700-0-1-601

01 Enforcement and Compliance
02 Policy, regulations and public services
03 Program oversight
9.01 Reimbursable program

ESA

Direct program
0105-0-1-505

01 Enforcement of wage and hour standards
04 Program direction and support
05 Labor-management standards
9.01 Reimbursable program

Veterans Employment and Training
0164-0-1-702

03 Administration
04 National Veterans Training Institute

Office of the Inspector General
0106-0-1-505

01 Program activities
02 Executive direction and management

Departmental Management
0165-0-1-505

01 Program direction and support (ASP)
02 Legal services
04 Administration and management
09 Chief Financial Officer











Outcome Goal 2.2

ETA

Fed Unemployment Benefits & Allowances
0326-0-1-999

01 Trade adjustment assistance benefits
03 NAFTA adjustment assistance benefits
9.01 Reimbursable program

Training & Employment Services
0174-0-1-504

13 National programs

Unemployment Compensation
0179-0-1-999

01 State Administration
02 National Activities
9.01 Reimbursable grants

Unemployment Trust Fund
8042-0-7-999

01, 02, 03 Federal State withdrawals
10, 11 Federal administrative expenses
20 Veterans employment and training
21 Interest on refunds

Program Administration
0172-0-1-504

03 Workforce security
05 Executive Direction

ESA
Direct program

0105-0-1-505

01 Enforcement of wage and hour standards
03 Federal programs for workers compensation
04 Program direction and support
05 Labor-management standards
9.01 Reimbursable program

Black Lung Disability Trust Fund
8144-0-7-601

01 Disabled coal miners benefits
02 Administrative expenses
03 Interest on advances

Special Workers Compensation Expenses
9971-0-7-601

01 Longshore and Harbor Workers Compensation Act
02 DC Compensation Act

Special Benefits
1521-0-1-600

01 Longshore and harbor workers compensation benefits
02 Federal Employee Compensation Act benefits

Panama Canal Commission Compensation Fund

5155-0-2-602

PWBA
1700-0-1-601

01 Enforcement and Compliance
02 Policy, regulations and public services
03 Program oversight
9.01 Reimbursable program

PBGC
4204-0-3-601

01 Single employer benefits payment
02 Multi-employer program financial assistance
9.03 Administrative expenses
9.04 Services related to terminations

Departmental Management
0165-0-1-505

01Program direction and support
02 Legal services
04 Administration and management
05 Adjudication
09 Chief Financial Officer

Office of the Inspector General: 0106-0-1-505

01 Program activities
02 Executive direction and management











Outcome Goal 2.3

ETA

Training & Employment Services
0174-0-1-504

03 Dislocated worker employment and training activities

Employment Service
0179-0-01-999

12 One-stop centers

Federal Unemployment Benefits & Allowances
0326-0-1-999

02 Trade adjustment assistance training
04 NAFTA adjustment assistance training

Program Administration
0172-0-1-504

01 Adult services
05 Executive Direction

Departmental Management
0165-0-1-505

01 Program direction and support
02 Legal services
04 Administration and management
09 Chief Financial Officer











Outcome Goal 3.1

OSHA
Direct Program
0040-0-1-554

01 Safety and health standards
02 Federal enforcement
03 State programs
04 Technical support
05 Federal compliance assistance
06 State consultation grants
07 Training grants
08 Safety and health statistics
09 Executive direction and administration
9.01 Reimbursable program

MSHA
Enforcement
1200-0-1-554

01 Coal
02 Metal/non-metal
03 Standards development
04 Assessment
05 Educational policy and development
06 Technical support
07 Program administration
9.01 Reimbursable program

Office of the Inspector General
0106-0-1-505

01 Program activities
02 Executive direction and management

Departmental Management
0165-0-1-505

01 Program direction and support
02 Legal services
04 Administration and management
09 Chief Financial Officer











Outcome Goal 3.2

ESA
Direct Program
0105-0-1-505

02 Federal contractor EEO standards enforcement
04 Program direction and support

Office of the Inspector General
0106-0-1-505

01 Program activities
02 Executive direction and management

Departmental Management
0165-0-1-505

01 Program Direction and support
02 Legal services
04 Administration and management
08 Civil Rights
09 Chief Financial Officer











Outcome Goal 3.3

ETA
Training and Employment Services
0174-0-1-504

13 National programs

Departmental Management
0165-0-1-505

01 Program direction and support (ASP)
02 Legal services
04 Administration and management
09 Chief Financial Officer











Outcome Goal 3.4

Departmental Management
0165-0-1-505

01 Program direction and support
02 Legal services
03 ILAB
04 Administration and management
09 Chief Financial Officer

Office of the Inspector General
0106-0-1-505

01 Program activities
02 Executive direction and management











Congressional Committee: Senate Government Affairs Committee
Goal 1: A Prepared Workforce: x
Goal 2: A Secure Workforce: x
Goal 3: Quality Workplaces: x
Departmental Management Goals: x

Congressional Committee: House Government Reform and Oversight Committee
Goal 1: A Prepared Workforce: x
Goal 2: A Secure Workforce: x
Goal 3: Quality Workplaces: x
Departmental Management Goals: x

Congressional Committee: Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions
Goal 1: A Prepared Workforce: x
Goal 2: A Secure Workforce: x
Goal 3: Quality Workplaces: x
Departmental Management Goals: x

Congressional Committee: House Education and Workforce Committee
Goal 1: A Prepared Workforce: x
Goal 2: A Secure Workforce: x
Goal 3: Quality Workplaces: x
Departmental Management Goals: x

Congressional Committee: House Appropriations Subcommittee for Labor, Health and Human Services
Goal 1: A Prepared Workforce: x
Goal 2: A Secure Workforce: x
Goal 3: Quality Workplaces: x
Departmental Management Goals: x

Congressional Committee: Senate Appropriations Subcommittee for Labor, Health and Human Services
Goal 1: A Prepared Workforce: x
Goal 2: A Secure Workforce: x
Goal 3: Quality Workplaces: x
Departmental Management Goals: x

Congressional Committee: House Budget Committee
Goal 1: A Prepared Workforce: x
Goal 2: A Secure Workforce: x
Goal 3: Quality Workplaces: x
Departmental Management Goals: x

Congressional Committee: Senate Budget Committee
Goal 1: A Prepared Workforce: x
Goal 2: A Secure Workforce: x
Goal 3: Quality Workplaces: x
Departmental Management Goals: x

Congressional Committee: Joint Economic Committee
Goal 1: A Prepared Workforce: x
Goal 2: A Secure Workforce: x
Goal 3: Quality Workplaces: x
Departmental Management Goals: x

Congressional Committee: Senate Indian Affairs Committee
Goal 1: A Prepared Workforce: x
Goal 2: A Secure Workforce:
Goal 3: Quality Workplaces:
Departmental Management Goals:

Congressional Committee: House Ways and Means Committee
Goal 1: A Prepared Workforce: x
Goal 2: A Secure Workforce: x
Goal 3: Quality Workplaces:
Departmental Management Goals:

Congressional Committee: Senate Finance Committee
Goal 1: A Prepared Workforce: x
Goal 2: A Secure Workforce: x
Goal 3: Quality Workplaces:
Departmental Management Goals:

Congressional Committee: House Veteran's Affairs Committee
Goal 1: A Prepared Workforce: x
Goal 2: A Secure Workforce: x
Goal 3: Quality Workplaces:
Departmental Management Goals:

Congressional Committee: Senate Veteran's Affairs Committee
Goal 1: A Prepared Workforce: x
Goal 2: A Secure Workforce: x
Goal 3: Quality Workplaces: x
Departmental Management Goals:

Congressional Committee: House Small Business Committee
Goal 1: A Prepared Workforce:
Goal 2: A Secure Workforce: x
Goal 3: Quality Workplaces: x
Departmental Management Goals:

Congressional Committee: House Resources Committee
Goal 1: A Prepared Workforce:
Goal 2: A Secure Workforce:
Goal 3: Quality Workplaces: x
Departmental Management Goals:

Congressional Committee: Senate Small Business Committee
Goal 1: A Prepared Workforce:
Goal 2: A Secure Workforce: x
Goal 3: Quality Workplaces: x
Departmental Management Goals:

Congressional Committee: Senate Environment and Public Works Committee
Goal 1: A Prepared Workforce:
Goal 2: A Secure Workforce:
Goal 3: Quality Workplaces: x
Departmental Management Goals: