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Secretary of Labor Thomas E. Perez
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ANNUAL REPORT FY 2002

Appendix 4

Strategic Goal 1—A Prepared Workforce

Outcome Goal 1.1: Increase Employment, Earnings and Assistance

Performance Goal 1.1B – FY 2001 Annual Performance Plan

In Program Year 2001, of those registered under the Workforce Investment Act (WIA) adult program, 78% will be employed in the thirdquarter after program exit, with increased average earnings of $3,361.

PY 2000: Of those registered under the WIA adult program and employed in the first quarter after exit, 77% will be employed in the third quarter after program exit, with increased average earnings of $3,264


Results

PY 2001: The goal was achieved. Of those registered and employed in the first quarter after program exit, 78.9 % were employed in the third quarter after program exit, with increase average earnings of $3,555.

PY 2000: The goal was exceeded. Of those registered under the WIA adult program and employed in the first quarter after exit, 78% were employed in the third quarter after program exit, with increased average earnings of $3,684.

PY 1999: Not applicable

Indicator

Employment retention after six months and average earnings change after six months

Data Source

Workforce Investment Act Standardized Record Data included in the Enterprise Information Management System and Unemployment Insurance Wage Records

Baseline

PY 2000, the first full year of WIA implementation, constitutes the baseline year for this measure. The performance measure is derived from the agreed upon levels of performance for all States. These measures will be regularly reviewed for appropriateness and rigor as performance data becomes available.

Comment

The Department, in collaboration with the Office of Management and Budget, is developing common performance measures for all employment and training programs. The purpose of this initiative is to develop common performance measures that address the goal of getting a job, job retention, and improved earnings for participants and costs in all affected programs. In FY 2003, the Department will begin the process of revising definitions of existing measures and reporting requirements consistent with existing laws so that the common measures may be implemented in Program Year 2004.

Performance Goal 1.1C — FY 2002 Annual Performance Plan

FY 2002: Strengthen the registered apprenticeship system to meet the training needs of business and workers in the 21st Century.

FY 1999-2001: N/A

Results

FY 2002: This goal was achieved. The number of new registered apprenticeship programs increased to 2,952, an increase of 75% over the established baseline. The number of new businesses involved in apprenticeship increased to 5,883, an increase of 99% over the established baseline. The number of new apprentices increased to 129,388, an increase of 64% over the baseline. The number of new programs in new and emerging industries – at a minimum Information Technology, Health Care and Social Services – increased to 326, an increase of 23% over the baseline.

FY 1999-2001: N/A

Indicator

FY 2002:

  • Increase the number of new apprenticeship programs over the established baseline by 10%;
  • Increase the number of new businesses involved in apprenticeship over the established baseline by 10%;
  • Increase the number of new apprentices over the established baseline by 10%; and
  • Increase the number of new programs in new and emerging industries – at minimum Information Technology, Health Care and Social Services – over the established baseline by 10%

Data Source

Registered Apprenticeship Information Management System as of February 2002 and the Apprenticeship Information Management System

Baseline

DOL established the baseline for each of the following indicators using the average of FYs 1999, 2000 and 2001 data:

  • New apprenticeship programs: 1,685
  • New businesses involved in apprenticeship: 2,953
  • New apprentices: 78,770
  • New programs in new and emerging industries: 266

Comment

DOL will develop the mechanisms for new indicators during FY 2003 to measure the following:

  • The number of apprentices that graduate; and
  • Entry and graduate apprentices’ wage gains.

Performance Goal 1.1C – FY 2001 Annual Performance Plan

In Program Year 2001, 76% of job seekers registered by the Wagner-Peyser Act funding stream will have unsubsidized jobs six months after initial entry into employment (Six Month Retention Rate).

Results

PY 2001: The goal was not measured. The Employment Service will not begin collecting employment retention outcome data until Program Year 2002 due to delays in implementing the new Labor Exchange Performance Measurement System.

Indicator

Percent of individuals registered who remained in unsubsidized jobs six months after entry into employment

Data Source

Job seekers registered by the Wagner-Peyser Act funding stream that have entered unsubsidized employment and received some service reported on the ETA 9002. In FY 2003, the Department will begin the process of revising definitions of existing measures and reporting requirements consistent with existing laws so that the common measures may be implemented in Program Year 2004.

Baseline

This is a new goal that States will begin reporting on effective PY 2002.

Comment

The Department, in collaboration with the Office of Management and Budget, is developing common performance measures for all employment and training programs. The purpose of this initiative is to develop common performance measures that address the goal of getting a job, job retention, and improved earnings for participants and costs in all affected programs.

Performance Goal 1.1D – FY 2001 Annual Performance Plan

In Program Year 2001, increase by 10 percent, the total number of job openings listed with the public employment service, including both those listed with State Workforce Agencies (SWA's) and those listed directly with America’s Job Bank (AJB) via the Internet.

PY 2000: Increase by 15 percent the total number of job openings listed with the public employment service, including both those listed with State Employment Security Agencies (SESA’s) and those listed directly with America’s Job Bank (AJB) via the Internet.

PY1999: Increase by 20 percent the total number of job openings listed with the public employment service, including both those listed with State Employment Security Agencies (SESA’s) and those listed directly with America’s Job Bank (AJB) via the Internet.

PY1998: Increase the total number of job openings listed with the public employment service by 20 percent.

Results

PY 2001: This goal was not achieved. 11.8 million openings were listed with the public employment service in PY 2001. Job openings listed with the SWA’s increased to 7.2 million in PY 2001 from 7.0 million in PY 2000. Job openings posted on AJB declined from 5.4 million in PY 2001 to 4.6 million job openings in PY 2001.

PY 2000: The goal was achieved. The number of job openings listed with State Workforce Agencies (7.0 million) and America’s Job Bank (5.4 million) increased by 21.1% over Program Year 1999.

PY 1999: The goal was achieved. The number of job openings listed with the public employment service in PY 1999 increased by 21% over the previous program year to 10,233,161.

PY 1998: The goal was not met. The number of listed job openings increased by 16.5% over the previous year.

Indicator

Number of job openings listed with SWA’s plus the number of job openings listed directly with AJB

Data Source

State Reports and AJB Data from the AJB Service Center (part of the State of New York, grantee for AJB)

Baseline

12.4 million total job openings were listed with the public employment service in PY 2000. 7.0 million job openings were listed with the SWA’s, while 5.4 million job openings were listed directly with AJB.

Performance Goal 1.1D — FY 2002 Annual Performance Plan

FY 2002: Thirty-four percent of veteran job seekers registering for public labor exchange services will be employed in the first or second quarter following registration.

FY 2001: 27% of those veterans and other eligible persons registering for public labor exchange services will enter employment each year through assistance provided by VETS’ funded staff and the Wagner-Peyser funded systems.

FY 2000: 27% of veterans that register with the Public Employment Service will enter employment and for DVOP and LVER staff the ratio will be 30%.

Results

FY 2002 The goal was achieved. The entered employment rate for veterans assisted by the public employment service system was 42.84 percent during the first three quarters of FY 2002.

FY 2001: The goal was achieved. The entered employment rate for veterans assisted by the public employment service system was 33 percent.

FY 2000: The goal was achieved. For DVOP and LVER staff, the entered employment rate was 32 percent. The entered employment rate for veterans helped by the public employment service system was 32 percent

Indicator

Percent of veterans and other eligible persons served by DVOP and LVER specialists who enter employment

Data Source

Reports submitted by State Employment Security Agencies

Baseline

FY 1999: 27%

Performance Goal 1.1E — FY 2002 Annual Performance Plan

FY 2002: Increase the employment and retention rate of homeless veterans enrolled in Homeless Veterans Reintegration Projects (HVRP)

  • At least 54% of veterans enrolled in HVRP enter employment.
  • Establish baseline for retention rate.

FY 2001: At least 50% of those veterans and other eligible persons enrolled in Homeless Veterans Project grants enter employment

Results

FY 2002: The goal was not met. The FY 2002 entered employment rate was 54.4 percent, exceeding the target of 54%. The second indicator, establishing a baseline for retention, was not achieved

FY 2001: The goal was achieved. The entered employment rate was 53%

Indicator

Number of veterans and other eligible persons enrolled in HVRP who enter employment.

Data Source

Reports submitted by VETS grantees

Baseline

FY 1999: 50%

Performance Goal 1.1F – FY 2002 Annual Performance Plan

FY 2002: Implement 12 demonstration programs, through grants, designed to develop and test strategies and techniques that need to be implemented in order for One Stop Centers and WIA youth programs to effectively serve persons with significant disabilities.

FY 1999-2001: Not applicable

Results

FY 2002: The goal was achieved. Sixteen demonstration programs for One-Stop Centers and WIA Youth programs were implemented. Additionally, 22 demonstration programs in other areas related to employment of adults and youth with disabilities were implemented.

FY 1999-2001: N/A

Indicator

The number of pilot projects initiated and the program area.

Data Source

ODEP Program Office

Baseline

FY 2003

Comment

Demonstration Pilots include: 8 Customized Employment Grants (Customized), 8 Innovative Demonstration Grants for Youth with Disabilities (WIA Youth), 12 WorkForce Coordinating Grants (WorkForce Planning), 3 WorkForce Action Grants (WorkForce Action), 2 High School/High Tech Grants (HS/HT), 1 Telework/Telecommuting Grant (Telework), 3 Faith-based and Community Initiatives Grants (Grassroots), and 1 Technical Assistance for Providers Cooperative Agreement (TAP).

Performance Goal 1.1G – FY 2001 Annual Performance Plan

In Program Year 2001, participants will be satisfied with services received from workforce investment activities as evidenced by a rating of 69 or higher on the American Customer Satisfaction Index

Results

PY 2001: This goal was achieved. Customer satisfaction of participants who received workforce investment activities resulted in a rating of 76.3 on the American Customer Satisfaction Index.

PY 2000: The goal was achieved. Customer satisfaction of participants who received workforce investment activities rated 77 on the American Customer Satisfaction Index.

PY 1999: Not applicable

Indicator

PY 2001: Customer satisfaction of participants with workforce investment activities will result in a rating of 69 on the American Customer Satisfaction Index.

PY 2000: Customer satisfaction of participants with workforce investment activities will result in a rating of 67 on the American Customer Satisfaction Index.

Data Source

WIA State reports included in the Enterprise Information Management System

Baseline

The goal was based on limited grantee experience gathering participant customer satisfaction information, including pilot projects.

Comment

The indicator is an index of participant customer satisfaction based upon three questions that are asked of a sample of those exiting WIA programs. The index is based upon the American Customer Satisfaction Index.

The participant customer satisfaction measure will be continued through Program Year 2003 but will be examined in the context of the Workforce Investment Act reauthorization process and the implementation of the Office of Management and Budget common performance measures for federal job training and employment programs.

Performance Goal 1.1H – FY 2001 Annual Performance Plan

In Program Year 2001, employers will be satisfied with services received from workforce investment activities as evidenced by a rating of 66 or higher on the American Customer Satisfaction Index.

Results

PY 2001: This goal was achieved. The customer satisfaction of employers who received workforce investment activities resulted in a rating of 74.2 on the American Customer Satisfaction Index.

PY 2000: The Department met the goal. Customer satisfaction of employers who received workforce investment activities rated 71 on the American Customer Satisfaction Index.

PY 1999: Not applicable

Indicator

PY 2001: Customer satisfaction of employers with workforce investment activities will result in a rating of 66 on the American Customer Satisfaction Index.

PY 2000: Customer satisfaction of employers with workforce investment activities will result in a rating of 65 on the American Customer Satisfaction Index.

Data Source

WIA State reports included in the Enterprise Information Management System

Baseline

The goal was based on limited grantee experience gathering employer customer satisfaction information, including pilot projects.

Comment

The indicator is an index of employer customer satisfaction based upon three questions that are asked of a sample of employers. The index is based upon the American Customer Satisfaction Index.

Outcome Goal 1.2: Increase the Number of Youth Making A Successful Transition to Work

Performance Goal 1.2A - FY 2002 Annual Performance Plan

Program Year 2001: Of the 14-18 year-old youth registered under the WIA youth program, 50 percent will be either employed, in advanced training, post-secondary education, military service, or apprenticeships in the third quarter after program exit.

Program Year 2000: Of the 14-18 year-old youth registered under the WIA youth program, 50 percent will be either employed, in advanced training, post-secondary education, military service, or apprenticeships in the third quarter after program exit.

Program Year 1999: N/A

Results

Program Year 2001: The goal was achieved. Of the 14-18 year old youth, 50.2 percent were either employed, in advanced training, post-secondary education, military service, or apprenticeships in the third quarter after program exit.

Program Year 2000: The goal was substantially achieved. Of the 14–18 year-old youth, 47.4% were either employed, in advanced training, post-secondary education, military service, or apprenticeships in the third quarter after program exit.

Indicator

Percent of youth in employment, advanced training, post-secondary education, military service, or apprenticeship six months after program exit

Data Source

State Workforce Investment Act reports included in the Enterprise Information System and Unemployment Insurance wage records

Baseline

Program Year 2000: 47.4 percent

Comment

The Department continues to work with State and local areas in the improvement of this performance goal as well as improving the provision of youth services under WIA. To increase the program’s emphasis on educational attainment for this age group, the Department has revised the Program Year 2002 goal to measure the attainment of a secondary school diploma or equivalent by the end of the first quarter after program exit for those 14-18 year old youth who enter the program without these credentials. The goal for this measure will be 50 percent. The retention measure for 14-18 year old youth will be discontinued as a goal. In addition, the Department plans to implement the Office of Management and Budget’s common performance measures for employment and training programs for Program Year 2004.

Performance Goal 1.2B - FY 2002 Annual Performance Plan

Program Year 2001: Of the 19-21 year-old youth served under the Workforce Investment Act youth program who are employed in the first quarter after program exit, 75 percent will be employed in the third quarter after program exit.

Program Year 2000: Of the 19-21 year-old youth served under the Workforce Investment Act youth program who are employed in the first quarter after program exit, 70 percent will be employed in the third quarter after program exit.

Program Year 1999: N/A

Results

Program Year 2001: The goal was achieved. 75.0 percent of the 19-21 year-old youth served under the Workforce Investment Act youth program who were employed in the first quarter after program exit were employed in the third quarter after program exit.

Program Year 2000: The goal was achieved. 74.4 percent of the 19-21 year-old youth served under the Workforce Investment Act youth program who were employed in the first quarter after program exit were employed in the third quarter after program exit.

Indicator

Percent of youth employed six months after program exit

Data Source

State Workforce Investment Act reports included in the Enterprise Information System and Unemployment Insurance wage records

Baseline

Program Year 2000: 74.4 percent

Comment

The Department continues to work with State and local areas in the improvement of this performance goal as well as improving the provision of youth services under WIA. In addition to this retention goal, the Department will have an additional goal for this older youth population that will measure placement in employment in the first quarter after program exit. Goals for Program Year 2002 will be 63 percent for placement in employment and 77 percent for retention in employment. In addition, the Department plans to implement the Office of Management and Budget’s common performance measures for employment and training programs for Program Year 2004 that will measure placement in employment or education, attainment of a diploma, General Equivalency Diploma, or certificate, and attainment of literacy and numeracy skills.

Performance Goal 1.2C - FY 2001 Annual Performance Plan

PY 2001: In Program Year 2001, 85% of Job Corps graduates will get jobs with entry average hourly wages of $7.25 or be enrolled in education; 70% will continue to be employed or enrolled in education six months after their initial placement date. (Placement and Retention)

PY 2000: Increase the percent of Job Corps graduates who get jobs or pursue education to 85%; those who get jobs will have an average entry wage increase from the previous year ($7.49); and 70% will still have a job or will be pursuing education after 90 days.

PY 1999: 75% of Job Corps trainees will get jobs or pursue further education, with those obtaining jobs having an average starting wage of $6.50 per hour.

Results

PY 2001: The goal was substantially achieved. The placement and wage goals were exceeded. 90% of Job Corps graduates got jobs with entry average hourly wages of $7.96, or were enrolled in education. The 6-month job/education retention rate after initial placement was 64%.

PY 2000: The goal was substantially achieved. The placement goal was exceeded. 91% of Job Corps graduates entered employment or pursued further education upon completion at an average hourly wage of $7.97. The 90-day job/education retention rate after initial placement was 67%.

PY 1999: The goal was achieved. 88% of Job Corps graduates were placed in jobs, the military, or pursued further education. For those placed in jobs, the average wage was $7.49 per hour.

PY 1998: The goal was achieved. 82.4% of Job Corps trainees were placed in jobs with a starting average hourly wage of $6.87 per hour.

Indicator

  • Percent of Job Corps graduates who obtain initial placement or who enroll in further education;
  • Average hourly wage of graduates at initial placement; and
  • Percent who retained jobs or who were still enrolled in further education six months after initial placement.

Data Source

The Office of Job Corps’ Management Information System is the source for this data. This comprehensive data collection system is rigorously designed to ensure data integrity. The system is monitored by Job Corps management and by a private contractor retained to provide data verification services.

Baseline

The PY 2000 results serve as the baseline for the initial placement and average hourly wage goals. There was no prior program data available for the 6-month retention goal; therefore, PY 2001 results serve as the baseline.

Comment

Job Corps targets severely disadvantaged youth with a variety of barriers to self-sufficiency, including deficiencies in education and job skills. To achieve the enhanced quality of placement and job retention required by the Workforce Investment Act, DOL will focus resources on program improvements that enhance the full Job Corps experience for students, from reinforced outreach and admission strategies and center program effectiveness to intensified center and post-center career development support. In addition, the Department plans to implement the Office of Management and Budget’s common performance measures for employment and training programs for Program Year 2004 that will measure placement in employment or education, attainment of a diploma, General Equivalency Diploma, or certificate, and attainment of literacy and numeracy skills.

Outcome Goal 1.3: Improve the Effectiveness of Information and Analysis on the U.S. Economy

Performance Goal 1.3A – FY 2002 Annual Performance Plan

FY 2002: Produce and disseminate timely, accurate, and relevant economic information.

FY 1999 – 2001: Same as FY 2002.

Results

FY 2002: The goal was met. See table below for detailed results.

FY 2001: The goal was met.

FY 2000: The goal was substantially achieved. BLS missed the timeliness targets for the Employment Cost Index (ECI), and the accuracy target for the Producer Price Index (PPI).

FY 1999: The goal was not met. BLS missed the timeliness targets for the National Labor Force; Employment, Hours, and Earnings; and PPI; and the accuracy target for the PPI.

Program Area

Dimension

Indicator

Target

Result

National Labor Force

Timeliness

Percentage of releases that are prepared on time.

100%

100%

Accuracy

Number of months that a change of at least 0.25 percentage point in the monthly unemployment rate will be statistically significant at the 90 percent confidence level.

12

12

Employment , Hours, and Earnings

Timeliness

Percentage of releases that are prepared on time.

100%

100%

Accuracy

Root mean square error of total nonfarm employment
(a measure of the amount of revision).

<70,000

46,5001

Consumer Prices and Price Indexes

Timeliness

Percentage of releases that are prepared on time.

100%

100%

Accuracy

Number of months that the standard error on the 12-month change in the U.S. City Average All Items CPI-U Index was 0.25 percent or less.

12

12

Producer Prices and Price Indexes

Timeliness

Percentage of releases that are prepared on time.

100%

100%

Accuracy

Percent of domestic output, within the scope of the PPI, that is covered by the PPI:

 

 

Goods produced
Services produced
Total production

85.1% 53.1% 62.7%

85.1%
53.1%
62.7%

U.S. Import and Export Price Indexes

Timeliness

Percentage of releases that are prepared on time.

100%

100%

Accuracy

Percent of U.S. exports and imports covered by the
International Price Program:

   

Goods in trade
Services in trade
Total in trade

100%
12%
80%

100%
12%
80%

Employment Cost Index

Timeliness

Percentage of releases that are prepared on time.

100%

100%

Accuracy

Number of quarters the change in Civilian Compensation Less Sales Workers Index was within +/- 0.5 percent at the 90 percent confidence level.

4

4

Internet Usage

Access

Improve the BLS Internet site, including output functionality for users retrieving data. For example, users will have the ability to obtain data from the BLS website and view it in a graphical format, which will provide a more intuitive visual mechanism for recognizing long-term trends and anomalies in large data sets.

N/A

Completed; users now have access to over 60 million line graphs.

Indicator

Percent of releases of National Labor Force; Employment, Hours, and Earnings; Consumer Prices and Price Indexes; Producer Prices and Price Indexes; U.S. Import and Export Price Indexes; and Employment Cost Index that are prepared on time; measures of accuracy for each Principal Federal Economic Indicator; and BLS Internet site improvement initiative.

Data Source

Office of Publications and Special Studies report of release dates against release schedule of BLS Principal Federal Economic Indicators; News releases for each Principal Federal Economic Indicator; Announcement of new Internet functionality on BLS "What’s new" page.

Baseline

Timeliness measures of 100 percent for each economic indicator. (Baseline is FY 1997 for National Labor Force statistics; Employment, Hours, and Earnings; Consumer Prices and Price Indexes; Producer Prices and Price Indexes; and Employment Cost Index. Baseline is FY 2001 for U.S. Import and Export Price Indexes.)

Quality measures:

National Labor Force: Number of months that a change of at least 0.25 percentage point in the monthly national unemployment rate will be statistically significant at the 90 percent confidence level (for an unemployment rate of 6 percent) = 12. (Baseline is FY 1997.)

Employment, Hours, and Earnings: Root mean square error of non-farm employment (a measure of the amount of revision) is less than 70,000. (Baseline is FY 2000.)

Consumer Prices and Price Indexes: Number of months that the standard error on the 12-month change in the U.S. City Average All Items CPI-U Index was 0.25 percentage point or less = 12. (Baseline is FY 2000.)

Producer Prices and Price Indexes: Percent of domestic output, within the scope of the PPI, that is covered by the PPI: goods produced = 85.1 percent; services produced = 38.8 percent; total production = 52.6 percent. (Baseline is FY 1997.)

U.S. Import and Export Price Indexes: Percent of U.S. foreign, both exports and imports, covered by the International Price Program: goods in trade = 100 percent; services in trade = 12 percent; total in trade = 80 percent. (Baseline is FY 2001.)

Employment Cost Index: Number of quarters the change in the Civilian Compensation Less Sales workers index was within +/- 0.5 percent at the 90 percent confidence level = 4. (Baseline is FY 1997.)

Internet access: Improve the BLS Internet site, including output functionality for users retrieving data. For example, users will have the ability to obtain data from the BLS website and view it in a graphical format, which will provide a more intuitive visual mechanism for recognizing long-term trends and anomalies in large data sets.

Comment

In order to increase the relevance of BLS information, BLS consults with advisory councils and other researchers. The Federal Economic Statistics Advisory Committee (FESAC) was continued in FY 2002 as were the BLS Business and Labor Research Advisory Councils. BLS and the Employment and Training Administration also continued to meet on a quarterly basis with State Labor Market Information Directors from each of the ten DOL regions to explore ways to improve the relevancy of our products for State and local (or subnational) data users.

1 Root mean square error (RMSE) calculated using the most recent revised information available (August 2002).

Performance Goal 1.3B – FY 2002 Annual Performance Plan

FY 2002: Improve the accuracy, efficiency, and relevancy of economic measures.

FY 1999 – 2001: Same as FY 2002.

Results

FY 2002: The goal was met. See detailed results below.

FY 2001: The goal was not met. Milestones were not met for (1) Conduct cognitive testing, finalize core questionnaire, and obtain OMB clearance for the American Time Use Survey and (2) In the Producer Price Index (PPI) program, research and select sample frames and develop pricing methodologies for the warehouse construction industry.

FY 2000: The goal was achieved.

FY 1999: The goal was achieved. Since the performance indicators are the accomplishments of milestones that are specific to the fiscal year, there is no continuity in indicators from year to year, even though the performance goal remained the same.

Milestones for Significant New or Enhanced Efforts in FY 2002 (see indicators below)

  1. Met. The first superlative Consumer Price Index (C-CPI-U) was published in August with release of July data.
  2. Met. The first biennial expenditure weight update for the Consumer Price Index (CPI) was introduced with publication of the January index in February 2002. Expenditure weights will be updated every two years to reduce the age of the CPI market basket.
  3. Met. In June, completed a full field test of the operational computer-assisted data collection (CADC) system for Consumer Price Index (CPI) items other than rent. Deployment of the system began with collection of data in 11 of the 87 primary sampling units (PSUs) in September. Data using this new system was included for the first time in the September CPI published in October.
  4. Met. To provide a more current revenue value for each industry and to allow for more accurate adjustment for transactions among companies internal to any industry grouping, reweighted the Producer Price Index using 1997 shipment values and updated input/output ratios for the January index released in February.
  5. Met. Reweighted and published U.S. Import and Export Indexes using 2000 trade values in February with the release of January data.
  6. Met. Released in July the first monthly job openings and labor turnover data as a developmental series for the Job Openings and Labor Turnover Survey.
  7. Met. Published the first Covered Employment and Wages data (ES-202) under the North American Industry Classification System which offers a new and more consistent approach to industrial classification that better reflects the modern economy.
  8. Met. Produced 18 new measures of labor productivity for 3-digit Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) service-producing industries in June.

Indicator

Milestones for Significant New or Enhanced Efforts in FY 2002

  1. Publish the first superlative Consumer Price Index (C-CPI-U).
  2. Beginning with January 2002 data, update expenditure weights in the Consumer Price Index every two years.
  3. Complete a full field test of the operational computer-assisted data collection (CADC) system for Consumer Price Index items other than rent.
  4. Reweight Producer Price Indexes using 1997 shipment values and updated input/output ratios.
  5. Reweight Import and Export Price Indexes using 2000 trade values.
  6. Begin releasing monthly data as a developmental series for the Job Openings and Labor Turnover Survey.
  7. Publish the first Covered Employment and Wages data (CEW) under the North American Industry Classification System.
  8. Produce measures of labor productivity and unit labor costs for 15 additional service-producing industries.

Data Source

BLS Quarterly Review and Analysis System.

Baseline

Since the performance indicators are the accomplishment of milestones, baselines are not applicable.

Comment

Indicators for goal 1.3B reflect the BLS commitment to continuous improvement of its statistical processes and products. These indicators are significant milestones towards the accomplishment of this improvement goal.

Strategic Goal 2—A Secure Workforce

Outcome Goal 2.1: Increase Compliance with Worker Protection Laws

Performance Goal 2.1A — FY 2002 Annual Performance Plan

FY 2002: Covered American workplaces legally, fairly, and safely employ and compensate their workers as indicated by:

  1. Reducing employer violation recidivism. In FY 2002, establish baselines for:
  • percentage of reinvestigations without violations.
  • percentage of reinvestigations with any violation.
  • percentage of reinvestigations with identical violations.
  • Increasing compliance in industries with chronic violations.
    1. as indicated in the garment manufacturing industry by:
      1. Increase by 2 percentage points the number of manufacturers that monitor their contractor shops for compliance in Southern California.
      2. Increase by 2 percent the average number of monitoring components used by manufacturers in monitoring their contractors for compliance in Southern California.
      3. Increase by 2 percentage points the percentage of contractors in Southern California that pay all employees on the payroll.
      4. Increase by 4 percentage points the level of compliance of new contractors in New York City through compliance education.
      5. Increase by 2 percentage points the percentage of contractors in New York City that pay all employees on the payroll.
    2. as indicated in the long-term health care industry by:
      1. Increase by 6,000 the number of employees of multi-establishment nursing home corporations impacted by corporate proactive steps such as training and self-audit.
      2. Increase by 5 percent the number of employers (nursing homes) that were provided compliance assistance information through seminars and other outreach efforts.
      3. Establish a baseline of the number of employers in compliance with the recordkeeping requirements of the Fair Labor Standards Act.
    3. as indicated in agricultural commodities:
      Establish baselines of compliance with the Migrant and Seasonal Agricultural Worker Protection Act (MSPA) provisions of disclosure, wages, housing and transportation and with the child labor provisions of the Fair Labor Standards Act relative to selected agricultural commodities in various locations in the U.S.

Results

FY 2002: This goal was substantially achieved.

  1. All three goals were achieved
    34% percent of reinvestigations were without violations.
    25% percent of reinvestigations (prior violators) had any violation.
    19% percent of reinvestigations (prior violators) had identical violations.
  2. a. 3 of 5 goals were achieved
    1. 53% of manufacturers monitor their contractor shops for compliance in Southern California – a 12 percentage point increase.
    2. The average number of monitoring components used by manufacturers in monitoring their contractors for compliance in Southern California in FY2002 is 6.37 – a 15% increase.
    3. 92% of contractors in Southern California pay all employees on the payroll – a 29 percentage point increase.
    4. 43% of new contractors in New York City participating in the NYC Compliance Assistance Program were in compliance – a decline of 8 percentage points.
    5. 43% of contractors in New York City pay all employees on the payroll – a 9 percentage point decline.
  1. b. The goals were achieved
    1. 16,426 additional employees of multi-establishment nursing home corporations were impacted by corporate proactive steps such as training and self-audit.
    2. 7,681 employers (nursing homes) were provided compliance assistance information through seminars and other outreach efforts – and increase of 215%
    3. 77% of employers (residential living) were in compliance with the recordkeeping requirements of the Fair Labor Standards Act.
  1. c. The goals were achieved
    • 61% of employers were in compliance with the MSPA disclosure provisions.
    • 91% of employers were in compliance with the MSPA wage provisions.
    • 74% of employers were in compliance with the MSPA housing safety and health provision.
    • 88% of employers were in compliance with the MSPA vehicle safety provisions (transportation).
    • 90% of employers were in compliance with the MSPA drivers license provisions (transportation).
    • 85% of employers were in compliance with the MSPA vehicle insurance provisions (transportation).
    • 98% of investigated employers were in compliance with child labor provisions.

FY 1999-2001: N/A

Indicator

Percentage of investigations without violations; percentage of reinvestigations with repeat violations; and percentage of reinvestigations with recurring violations.

Trends in the percent of garment manufacturers that monitor their contractor shops for compliance.

Trends in the number of multi-establishment health care corporations that take proactive steps to promote and achieve corporate-wide compliance.

Baseline of compliance with certain MSPA provisions (i.e., disclosure, wages, housing and transportation) and with the child labor provisions of the FLSA relative to selected agricultural commodities in various locations in the U.S.

Data Source

Wage and Hour Investigator Support and Reporting Database (WHISARD) for FY 2002.

Wage and Hour Investigator Support and Reporting Database (WHISARD) data for garment manufacturer investigations; WHD significant activity reports on health care activities; WHISARD data and regional logs on agricultural activities; statistically-valid investigation-based compliance surveys in defined industries.

Baseline

1.                   Baselines to be determined by the end of FY 2002.
2a.       1.       41%.
2a.       2.       5.5 (of a total of 7).
2a.       3.       63%.
2a.       4.       51%.
2a.       5.       52%.
2b.       1.       48,000 employees. 2b. 2. 2,437 employers.
2b.       3.       Baselines to be determined by the end of FY 2002.
2c.                 Baselines to be determined by the end of FY 2002.

Comment

  1. Employment Standards Administration (ESA) completed 4,942 reinvestigations of employers under all laws administered by ESA/WHD. These 4,942 reinvestigations include both employers previously investigated and found in violation and employers previously investigated and found in compliance. Of the concluded reinvestigations, 1,677 (34%) found no violations of laws administered by ESA/WHD. The next two measures look only at prior violators. Twenty-five percent (25%) of total reinvestigations (1,242) found that prior violators continued to violate one or more of the statutes administered by ESA/WHD. Nineteen percent (19%) of reinvestigations concluded (938) found prior violators committed identical violations. Of the 1,242 prior violators that continued to have violations, 938 (or about three-fourths) had violations identical to those found in the prior investigation.
  2. c. The percent of contractors found in compliance with the MSPA housing provisions are based on data from the agency’s database of investigations, which were concluded during the fiscal year and for which there were findings under MSPA. These percentages do not and are not intended to represent the levels of compliance in the industry. Nearly 95% of the completed cases were directed investigations of employers. Employers selected for investigation by the agency in FY2002 were generally those in commodities like tomatoes, onions, lettuce and cucumbers that have been the focus of the agency’s compliance efforts over a number of years. Other employers selected for investigation were those that had prior violations. This targeting introduces some bias to the investigation database. As a result, the database is not a representative sample of the agricultural universe. Readers should not assume that the levels of compliance reported herein are reflective of the agricultural industry as a whole. The data do, however, provide the agency with a relative perspective on which of the MSPA critical provisions are most commonly violated and thus, where the agency should direct its resources. The data also support the agency’s decision to shift from a commodity-based targeting strategy to a targeting strategy more closely based on the MSPA statutory provisions. Based on the analysis of the FY 2002 data, DOL will direct its FY2003 compliance assistance and enforcement resources on increasing employer compliance with the MSPA housing safety and health standards. DOL weighed the relative harm to employees from a failure to disclose wages or other conditions to the potential life-threatening risk to employees if employers fail to provide safe and healthy housing.

Performance Goal 2.1B — FY 2002 Annual Performance Plan

FY 2002: Advance safeguards for union financial integrity and democracy and the transparency of union operations as indicated by:

1. Improvement in the timely filing of union annual financial reports that contain information sufficient for public disclosure. In FY 2002, initiate a new electronic forms application and electronic submission system and establish a baseline for timely filing under the new process.

2. Extending Labor-Management Reporting and Disclosure Act (LMRDA) protections for union financial integrity to a greater number of labor organizations through the more effective use of investigative resources. In FY 2002, establish a baseline of the percentage of investigative resources applied to criminal investigations that result in convictions.

FY 2001: Achieve timely union reporting such that a minimum of 88% of unions with annual receipts greater than $200,000 timely file union annual financial reports for public disclosure access.

FY 2000: Minimum of 87% of unions with annual receipts greater than $200,000 timely file union annual financial reports for public disclosure.

FY 1999: 85% of unions with receipts greater than $200,000, timely file union annual financial reports for public disclosure.

Results

FY 2002: The goal was achieved.

OLMS initiated the Internet-based public disclosure system in June 2002. A baseline for the timely filing of union reports was established for FY 2002 union reporting activity: 44% of the reports required of unions with annual receipts greater than $200,000.

A baseline of 50% was established for the percentage of investigative resources applied to criminal cases that result in convictions.

FY 1999-FY 2001: N/A

Indicator

  1. Percentage of financial reports timely filed for public disclosure availability
  2. Percentage of investigative resources applied to criminal investigations that result in convictions.

FY 1999-FY 2001: N/A

Data Source

Labor Organization Reporting System.
OLMS Case Data System.

Baseline

FY 1999-FY 2001: N/A

Comment

  1. Improvement in the sufficiency, as well as the timeliness, of union reports is critical in advancing the safeguards for union democracy and financial integrity established under the Labor-Management Reporting and Disclosure Act. In FY 2003, OLMS will establish a baseline percentage of filed reports determined to be sufficient for public disclosure.
  2. OLMS monitors the percentage of investigative resources applied to criminal cases that result in conviction to enable the agency to extend LMRDA protections for union financial integrity to more unions. The agency is exploring additional measures in support of the LMRDA union financial integrity protection.

Performance Goal 2.1C — FY 2002 Annual Performance Plan

Increase by 5% per year (to 1,993) the number of closed fiduciary investigations of employee pension plans where assets are restored, prohibited transactions are corrected, participant benefits are restored, or plan assets are protected from mismanagement and risk of future loss is reduced.

FY 2001: Increase by 2.5% per year (to 1,725) the number of closed fiduciary investigations of employee pension plans where assets are restored, prohibited transactions are corrected, participant benefits are recovered, or plan assets are protected from mismanagement and risk of future loss is reduced.

FY 2000: 2.1C—Increase by 2.5% both the number of closed investigations of employee pension and health benefits plans where assets are restored (to 819) and the number where prohibited transactions are reversed (to 301). [This goal was split into a pension goal and a health and welfare goal in FY 2001—2.1F and 2.1G—in FY 2001.]

FY 1999: 2.1C—Increase by 2.5% both the number of closed investigations of employee pension and health benefits plans where assets are restored (to 537) and prohibited transactions are corrected (to 241). [This goal was split into a pension goal and a health and welfare goal in FY 2001—2.1F and 2.1G—in FY 2001.]

Results

FY 2002: The goal was substantially achieved. 1,985 (99.6%) pension cases closed where assets were restored, prohibited transactions were corrected, participant benefits were recovered, or plan assets were protected from mismanagement and risk of future loss was reduced.

FY 2001: The goal was achieved. 1,942 pension cases closed where assets were restored, prohibited transactions were corrected, participant benefits were recovered, or plan assets were protected from mismanagement and risk of future loss was reduced.

FY 2000: The goal was achieved. 1,187 cases where assets were restored and 538 cases where Prohibited Transactions were corrected. [Result for combined pension and health and welfare goal.]

FY 1999: Goal was achieved. 958 cases where assets were restored and 389 cases where Prohibited Transactions were corrected. [Result for combined pension and health and welfare goal.]

Indicator

Number of closed fiduciary investigations of employees’ pension plans where assets are restored, prohibited transactions are corrected, participant benefits are recovered, or plan assets are protected.

Data Source

Enforcement Management Systems

Baseline

The number of investigations of employee pension plans where assets are restored, prohibited transactions are corrected, participant benefits are recovered, or plan assets are protected for FY 2000-2001 (1,899).

Comment

This goal will be terminated in FY 2003 and replaced with the outcome goal enhancing benefit security. The new goal will be measured by a series of selected indices.

Performance Goal 2.1D — FY 2002 Annual Performance Plan

Increase by 5% per year (to 620) the number of closed fiduciary investigations of employee health and welfare plans where assets are restored, prohibited transactions are corrected, participant benefits are restored, plan assets are protected from mismanagement and risk of future loss is reduced.

FY 2001: Increase by 2.5% (to 340) per year the number of closed fiduciary investigations of employee health and welfare plans where assets are restored, prohibited transactions are corrected, participant benefits are recovered, or plan assets are protected from mismanagement and risk of future loss is reduced.

FY 1999-FY 2000: Not applicable—see goal 2.1F on goals and results for the combined pension and health and welfare benefits goal.

Results

FY 2002: The goal was achieved. 892 health and welfare cases closed where assets were restored, prohibited transactions were corrected, participant benefits were recovered, or plan assets were protected from mismanagement and risk of future loss was reduced.

FY 2001: The goal was achieved. 782 health and welfare cases closed where assets were restored, prohibited transactions were corrected, participant benefits were recovered, or plan assets were protected from mismanagement and risk of future loss was reduced.

FY 1999-FY2000: N/A

Indicator

Number of closed fiduciary investigations of employees’ health and welfare plans where assets are restored, prohibited transactions are corrected, participant benefits are recovered, or plan assets are protected

Data Source

Enforcement Management Systems

Baseline

The number of investigations of employee health and welfare plans where prohibited transactions are corrected, assets are restored, participant benefits are recovered, or plan assets are protected for fiscal years 2000-2001 (590).

Comment

This goal will be terminated in FY 2003 and replaced with the outcome goal enhancing benefit security. The new goal will be measured by a series of selected indices.

Outcome Goal 2.2: Protect Worker Benefits

Performance Goal 2.2A — FY 2002 Annual Performance Plan

FY 2002: Make timely and accurate benefit payments to and facilitate the reemployment of Unemployed Workers and set up Unemployment Insurance (UI) tax accounts promptly for new employers.

  • Payment Timeliness: 91% of all intrastate first payments will be made within 21 days;
  • Payment Accuracy: establish a baseline to improve Unemployment Insurance accuracy nationwide;
  • Reemployment of UI Claimants: establish a baseline to increase the entered employment rate of Unemployment Insurance claimants; and
  • Establishment of UI Tax Accounts: 80% of determinations about UI tax liability for new employers will be made within 90 days of the end of the first quarter they become liable for the tax.

FY 2000 - 2001: Unemployed workers receive fair UI benefit eligibility determinations and timely benefit payments.

Results

FY 2002: The goal was not achieved.

  • Timely benefit payments: 88.7% of first payments were made within three weeks, versus a target of 91%;
  • Prompt set-up of tax accounts: 81.7% of new status determinations were made within 90 days of the end of the quarter the employers first became liable for UI taxes and reports, versus a target of 80%;
  • Accurate benefit payments. After consultation with the system on alternatives, a measure of integrity was recommended to the Assistant Secretary. A baseline was established for this measure and a target for 2003 set; and
  • Alternative measures for the rate UI claimants have entered into employment were developed and have been presented to the Assistant Secretary. Discussion with States may follow. No data will be available to produce baseline estimates before FY 2003.

FY 2001: This goal was not achieved.

  • 25 States met or exceeded the minimum performance criterion for benefit adjudication quality against a target of increasing the number to 26 States (nationwide, 70.3% of all non-monetary determinations were adequate); and
  • 42 States met or exceeded the Secretary’s Standard for intrastate payment timeliness against a target of increasing the number to 48 States (nationally, 90.3% of all intrastate first payments were made within 14/21 days, up from 89.9% in FY 2000).

FY 2000: The goal was substantially met.

  • 23 States met or exceeded the minimum performance criterion for benefit adjudication quality against the FY 2000 target of 24 (nationwide, 70.3% of all nonmonetary determinations were adequate, the same as in FY 1999); and
  • 47 States met or exceeded the Secretary’s Standard for intrastate payment timeliness against a target of 47 States (nationally, 89.9% of all intrastate first payments were made within 14/21 days, up from 89.6% in FY 1999).

Indicator

FY 2002:

  • Payment Timeliness: 91% of all intrastate first payments will be made within 21 days of the end of the first week of unemployment for which the claimant was eligible to receive a benefit;
  • Payment Accuracy: In FY 2002, a measure of integrity—the actual amount of overpayments established for recovery divided by the amount the States could potentially have established—was recommended after consultation with system partners and stakeholders. If accepted by the Assistant Secretary, the baseline will be 57.9% for FY 2001, and the target for FY 2003 will be 62.7%;
  • Facilitate Reemployment: The proportion of UI claimants registered with the State labor exchange agencies that have entered employment (i.e., found jobs with other than their previous employer) in the subsequent quarter has been recommended to the Assistant Secretary, with the further recommendation that the system be consulted about the measure. No baseline can be established until reporting begins for the quarter ending September 30, 2003; and
  • Establish Tax Accounts Promptly: 80% of determinations about UI tax liability for new employers will be made within 90 days of the end of the first quarter they become liable for the tax.

FY 2001:

  • Eligibility Determinations Fairness: Increase to 26 the number of States meeting or exceeding the minimum performance criterion for benefit adjudication quality, which is that a sampled adjudication receive a score of at least 81 points using a standard review instrument; and
  • Payment Timeliness: Increase to 48 the number of States meeting or exceeding the Secretary’s Standard (minimum performance criterion) for intrastate benefit payment timeliness that at least 87% of payments be made within 21 days of the end of the first week of unemployment for which the claimant could receive a benefit.

FY 2000:

  • Eligibility Determinations Fairness: Increase to 24 the number of States meeting or exceeding the minimum performance criterion for benefit adjudication quality, which is that a sampled adjudication receive a score of at least 81 points using a standard review instrument; and
  • Payment Timeliness: Increase to 47 the number of States meeting or exceeding the Secretary’s Standard (minimum performance criterion) for intrastate benefit payment timeliness that at least 87% of payments be made within 21 days of the end of the first week of unemployment for which the claimant could receive a benefit.

Data Source

Payment timeliness: 9050 and 9050p Report
Payment Accuracy: Benefit Accuracy Measurement Program and ETA 227 Report
Entered Employment: (Recommended measure: ES 9002 Report)
New Status Determinations Timeliness: ETA 581 Report
Eligibility Determinations Quality: ETA 9056 Report

Baseline

Fiscal Year 2001: The baseline established is:

  • Payment Timeliness: 90.3% of all intrastate first payments were made within 14/21 days;
  • Payment Accuracy: States established for recovery 57.9% of potentially recoverable dollars overpaid;
  • Entered Employment: N/A; and
  • Establish tax accounts promptly: 79.1% of new employers received a determination about their UI tax liability within 90 days of the end of the first quarter they became liable for the tax.

Comment

Economic conditions and States’ need to implement the Temporary Extended Unemployment Compensation program in March 2002 tended to reduce payment timeliness during FY 2002. Between TEUC and regular claims, the initial claims load rose by 30% between 2001 and 2002 for the country; it averaged over 50% in the 10 States with the greatest decline in payment timeliness. The decline may have helped status determination timeliness, as the number of determinations fell and growth in the number of subject employers slowed. At this point, the Office of Workforce Security has developed the measures for payment accuracy and reemployment facilitation for the approval of the ETA Assistant Secretary. ETA is considering changing the indicator for the Payment Accuracy goal for FY 2004 from a recommended establishment effectiveness measure to a recovery effectiveness measure. The new indicator would become dollars actually recovered as a percent of dollars potentially recoverable.

Performance Goal 2.2B — FY 2002 Annual Performance Plan

Promptly review employer applications for foreign labor certifications.

In Fiscal Year 2002: 95% of labor condition applications for the H-1B professional/specialty temporary program will be processed within seven days of receipt.

Results

FY 2002: DOL achieved this goal by meeting the seven day processing requirement for 99.5% of the labor condition applications that were filed for the H-1B professional/specialty temporary program. (Goal = 95%)

FY 1999 – FY 2001: Not Applicable

Indicator

FY 2002: Process 95% of employer labor condition applications for the H-1B professional/specialty temporary program within seven days of receipt.

FY 1999-2001: Not Applicable

Data Source

1) Internet labor condition application processing system

2) Facsimile/mail labor condition application processing system

Baseline

Established in Calendar Year 2000, the baseline for the H-1B temporary labor certification process was 63%.

Comment

DOL achieved the goal primarily by offering employers the option of filing labor condition applications via the Internet. In most instances, the Department processes applications and issues decision within one day of filing when employers file their applications on-line. Fax and mail submittals of applications remain available for those without ready access to the Internet. The Department also made improvements to the fax and mail processing system, with the result that these applications are processed in less than three days

Performance Goal 2.2C — FY 2002 Annual Performance Plan

FY 2002: Increase by 2% (to $67 million) benefit recoveries achieved through the assistance of Pension Benefit Advisors.

FY 2001: Increase by 2% (to $66 million) benefit recoveries achieved through the assistance of Pension Benefit Advisors.

FY 2000: Increase by 2% (to $53 million) benefit recoveries achieved through the assistance of Pension Benefit Advisors.

FY 1999: Not applicable

Results

FY 2002: The goal was not achieved. The Department recovered $49 million as a result of participant assistance.

FY 2001: The goal was not achieved. The Department recovered $65 million as a result of participant assistance.

FY 2000: The goal was achieved. The Department recovered $67 million as a result of participant assistance.

FY1999: Not applicable

Indicator

The dollar value of benefit recoveries achieved through the assistance of technical assistance staff.

Data Source

The Technical Assistance and Inquiries System

Baseline

Average of the benefit recoveries achieved in FY 2000 and FY 2001 ($66 million)

Comment

Three external factors beyond DOL’s control contributed to not achieving the goal. First, benefit recoveries, by their very nature, are volatile from year to year. Second, in FY 2000, the Department experienced several large recoveries (in excess of $500,000) that cannot be expected every year — thereby inflating the rolling average base used to establish FY 2001 and 2002 targets. However, DOL maintained this ambitious target as a stretch goal. Three, due to less robust economic conditions, employees who may be entitled to benefit payments may be unable to collect because the employer is bankrupt or does not have sufficient funds. Also, difficult economic times may hamper a health plan’s ability to pay medical claims. Notwithstanding these external factors, $49 million is a worthy achievement. In addition, Benefit Adviser leads are among the best sources for new cases. In FY 2002, approximately 52% of participant benefit recoveries achieved via formal investigations ($32 million) were a direct result of Benefit Adviser referrals. Benefit recoveries from investigations as a result of referrals continues to increase steadily, further demonstrating that the Department is achieving positive results from a stable and more fully experienced Benefit Adviser staff.

The goal will be terminated in FY 2003. Benefit recovery is only a partial indicator of program success and does not measure the impact of answering inquiries, educating the consumer, or responding to the increase in health related questions. Of approximately 180,000 inquiries received, less than 1,600 result in monetary recoveries — the inquiries are seeking information only v. a benefit recovery. Therefore, DOL will incorporate a broader customer assistance component into its overall revised performance goal in FY 2003 via the American Customer Satisfaction Index or comparable measure and will continue to explore improved ways of measuring its outreach and education and technical assistance programs.

Performance Goal 2.2D — FY 2002 Annual Performance Plan

FY 2002: Minimize the human, social, and financial impact of work-related injuries for workers and their families. In FY 2002:

  1. Decrease by 2% from the FY 2001 baseline the average number of production days lost due to disability in the FECA program for
    • United States Postal Service (USPS ) cases
    • All other Government cases.
  2. Reduce by 2% over the baseline the average time required to resolve disputed issues in Longshore and Harbor Worker’s Compensation Program contested cases.
  3. Increase by 2% over the FY 2001 established baseline the percentage of Black Lung benefit claims for which, following an eligibility decision by the district director, there are no requests for further action from any party pending one year after receipt of the claim.
  4. For Initial Processing of claims for benefits in the Energy Program:
    • 75% of claims of Department of Energy (DOE) employees, or of contractors employed at DOE facilities, are processed within 120 days.
    • 75% of claims of employees of Atomic Weapons Employers (AME) and Beryllium Vendors are processed within 180 days.
  5. For processing of Requests for Hearings in the Energy Program:
    • 75% of Final Decisions in Approved Claims or No-Contest Denials are issued within 75 days from issuance of the Recommended Decision.
    • 75% of Final Decisions in Reviews of the Written Record are issued within 75 days of the Request for Review of Written Record.
    • 75% of Final Decisions in Formal Hearings are issued within 250 days of the Request for Hearing.
  6. Through use of Periodic Roll Management, produce $122 million in cumulative first-year savings (FY 1999 -2002) in the FECA program.
  7. Reduce the overall average medical service costs per case (adjusted for inflation) in the FECA program by .5% versus the FY 2000 baseline.

FY 2001:
1. 2% reduction from the FY 2000 baseline in the average number of production days lost due to disability.
2. Establish performance baseline and begin data collection for performance tracking.
3. Establish a baseline by the end of FY 2001
4. - 5. N/A
6. Produce $95 million in cumulative first-year savings
7. Reduction of overall average medical costs will be measured against a FY 2000 baseline.

FY 2000:
1. Reduce to 173 days (QCM cases only); establish baseline for all cases
2. Complete system programming for entering and generating goal-related data and establish a baseline against which to measure performance
3. Finalize and implement new regulations. Develop materials to provide all parties with information about the revised claims development and adjudication process.
4. - 5. N/A
6. Produce $66 million in cumulative first-year savings.
7.Save an additional $5 million over FY 1999 compared to amounts charged through full-year implementation of fee schedules for inpatient hospital and pharmacy services.

FY 1999:
1. Reduce to 178 days (QCM cases only)
2. Complete the process of defining a case resolution.
3. Implement initial findings package designed to more effectively provide all parties with information about decisions made on individual claims
4.-5. N/A
6. $19 million in first-year savings.
7. Save 19% versus amounts billed for FECA medical service subject to fee schedules.

Results

FY 2002: This goal was not achieved. Of the seven performance indicators included under this goal the targets were
achieved for two, substantially achieved for one, and not achieved for four.

  1. This indicator was not achieved. While LPD for injury cases of the United States Postal Service rose by 11.6% to 131 days,
    LPD for the All Other Government Agencies was reduced by 4.6% to 53.8 days.
  2. This indicator was not achieved. Resolving disputed issues required an average of 285 days.
  3. This indicator was achieved. 89.9 % of claims subject to the new regulations on which district director decisions ere based
    had no pending requests for further action one year after receipt of the claim.
  4. This indicator was not achieved. The FY 2002 target for these performance indicators was 75%. Results from year-end totals showed that 48% of claims of Department of Energy (DOE) employees, or of contractors employed at DOE Facilities, were processed within 120 days, and that 48% of claims of employees of Atomic Weapons Employers and Beryllium Vendors were processed within 180 days.
  5. This indicator was substantially achieved. The FY 2002 target for these performance indicators was 75%. Results from year-end
    totals showed that 76% of final decisions in approved claims or no-contest denials were issued within 75 days from
    issuance of the recommended decision, 74% of final decisions in reviews of the written record were issued within 75 days of the request for review of written record, and 100% of final decisions in formal hearings were issued within 250 days of the request for hearing.
  6. This indicator was achieved. Periodic Roll Management (PRM) produced an additional $25.6 million in first-year compensation benefit savings in FY 2002, bringing cumulative total first-year savings to $128.9 million.
  7. This indicator was not achieved. Average overall FECA medical cost per case in FY 2002 was $2,604. After adjusting for inflation using the Consumer Price Index for Medical Care, this represents a 6.8% increase compared to the average of $2,230 in FY 2000.

FY 2001:

  1. The goal was not met. The FY 2000 baseline is 68.1 days, and the FY 2001 target was 66.7. The overall government-wide average LPD was 76.9, a 15.3% increase.
  2. The goal was met. A performance baseline of 242 days was established and performance data tracking is underway.
  3. The goal was met. A performance baseline of 66.5% of claims filed was established. Staff training was completed and the new findings package has been in use since the August 9th Court ruling upholding the new regulations and lifting the stay on adjudication.
  4. N/A.
  5. N/A.
  6. This goal was exceeded. PRM produced an additional $31 million in first-year savings in FY 2001, bringing cumulative total first-year savings to $103 million.
  7. The goal was not met. Average cost per case for Psychiatric services were reduced by nearly 3% over FY 2000; for Physical Therapy services, however, average cost increased by 4.5% (adjusted for inflation).

FY 2000:

  1. This goal was exceeded. Average lost production days (LPD) measured for Quality Case Management cases in FY 2000 was 164 days. The reduction equated to a $17.7 million savings in compensation costs.
  2. This goal was substantially met. System programming was completed and data collected started. The target for establishing a baseline was extended to May 2001.
  3. This goal was substantially met.
  4. N/A.
  5. This goal was exceeded. Cumulative first-year savings for FY 1999-2000 were $72 million. PRM productivity remained higher than expected.
  6. This goal was exceeded. The FECA program saved $34.5 million (61% over target) using fee schedules for Inpatient and Pharmacy services.

FY 1999:

  1. This goal was exceeded. Average lost production for cases measured in FY 1999 was 173 days against a target of 178 days. This was nearly a 9% reduction compared to the FY 1997 baseline.
  2. By September 30, a definition of "case resolution" was developed and distributed to program district directors and OWCP regional directors.
  3. The program implemented part of its revised initial findings package in July 1999. The remainder of the findings package was awaiting finalization of the new regulations.
  4. N/A
  5. N/A
  6. The goal was exceeded. PRM case review actions produced an additional $20.8 million in FECA compensation benefit savings.
  7. Both the original and revised goals were exceeded.

Indicator

  1. Average number of days lost due to workplace injuries per employed Federal civilian worker. The measurement consists of time lost during the initial 45-day, continuation-of-pay period while the claim remains in the jurisdiction of the Federal agency employer, plus LPD within the first year of the beginning of wage-loss benefits under the FECA following COP.
  2. The average number of days elapsed between the date a dispute is received in a Longshore case form any party and the date that the dispute is resolved.
  3. Percentage of claims filed which are subject to the new Black Lung regulations on which no requests for further proceedings (reconsideration, modification, informal conference, formal hearing) are pending one year after receipt of the claim by the program.
  4. The percent of claims processed by the Energy Employees Compensation Program, which reach initial completion within the relevant timeframe measured in calendar days from the date of receipt of the claim by the program to the status date indicating completion of initial processing. Completion of initial processing includes: 1) Issuance of Recommended Acceptance in Radiation Exposure Compensation Act (RECA) claims; 2) Issuance of Recommended Denials; 3) Issuance of Form EE15 in non-RECA accepted claims; or 3) Referral of a claim to the National Institutes for Safety and Health.
  5. The percent of all final Decisions issued within the relevant timeframe as measured in calendar days from the date of:
  • The issuance of the Recommended Decision to the Final Decision in Approved Claims or no-Contests Denials;
  • The receipt of the request for Review of the Written Record to the date of the Final Decision; or
  • The receipt of Request for Hearing to the date of issuance of the Final Decision.
  • The fiscal year amount of total periodic payment (compensation benefit) reductions in PRM universe cases.
  • Overall average case costs, after adjustment for inflation, for all cases receiving medical services.

Data Source

1. Federal Employees’ Compensation Act (FECA) data systems; Federal agency payroll offices; Office of Personnel Management employment statistics.
2. Longshore Case Management System.
3. Black Lung Automated Support Package.
4. - 5. Energy Program Case Management System
6. Periodic Roll Management System; FECA Automated Compensation Payment System.
7. FECA Medical Bill Pay System.

Baseline

  1. Interim baseline for Quality Case Management (QCM) cases only: FY 1997 actual – 189 workdays. FY 2000 baseline: 68.1workdays.
    FY 2001 actual results will serve as new baselines: preliminary results are 119 days for USPS, and 54.1 days for All Other Agencies.
  2. An average of 242 days elapsed nationwide between the dispute receipt date and the dispute resolution date.
  3. FY 2001: 66.5% of Black Lung benefit claims, following an eligibility decision by the district director, had no requests for
    further action from any party pending one year after receipt of the claim.
  4. This is a new measure for FY 2002. While target levels have been established, the actual performance results in FY 2002 will serve as the baseline for this measure.
  5. This is a new measure for FY 2002. While target levels have been established, the actual performance results in FY 2002 will serve as the baseline for this measure.
  6. For all cases with benefit actions in the measurement year, the periodic payment amount paid at time of their entry into the PRM universe, compared to the periodic payment amount after benefit reduction. The methodology for measuring savings from compensation benefit adjustments and terminations was revised in FY 2000 to coincide with PRM’s integration into permanent operations. PRM savings for performance reporting were previously derived by comparing total FECA program benefit reductions in all cases, including PRM cases, in the measurement year, to total reductions produced in the baseline year but not counting PRM case reductions.
  7. Overall Average Medical Cost Baseline: Average annual cost per case in FY 2000 for all cases receiving medical services.

Comment

1. In light of widespread public health incidents subsequent to the anthrax events involving postal workers, and because USPS is excluded from OSHA’s Federal safety initiative since it is regulated as a private sector entity, this goal has been bifurcated to measure LPD for USPS cases and for all other Federal agencies separately. Post September 11, 2001, impacts on the USPS, including overall reductions in mail volume, resulted in higher LPD during FY 2001 and FY 2002, and that trend is expected to be difficult to reverse. Accordingly, beginning in FY 2003, we plan to revise the goals for USPS and all other government agencies to more appropriate baselines and targets.
2. As the Longshore performance indicator measurement process matured, it became clear that the baseline had been truncated too quickly and therefore did not represent an accurate performance picture against which to measure program effectiveness. Although it is impossible to assess the year’s performance against prior periods, the program did achieve continual quarterly reductions in the average time to resolve disputes during FY 2002.
7. For this measure, FECA average medical costs are adjusted for inflation using the CPI-Medical, compiled and reported by the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Because the CPI-M only measures consumers' out-of-pocket expenditures, a small fraction of total expenditures on medical services in America, we have chosen the Health Cost Index (HCI), published quarterly by Milliman USA to better compare FECA medical costs to overall US health care costs. The HCI captures changes in health care costs per capita for the overall (non-Medicare) population and reflects revenue trends that health care providers are generating including both insurer and patient payments. When adjusted using the HCI, FECA average medical costs in FY 2002 show a decrease of 2% from the FY 2000 baseline.

Performance Goal 2.2E — FY 2002 Annual Performance Plan

FY 2002: Reduce the average processing time to 3 years to send benefit determinations to participants in defined benefit pension plans taken over by PBGC.

FY 2001: Reduce processing time from 4–5 years to 3–4 years to send benefit determinations to participants in defined benefit pension plans taken over by PBGC.

FY 2000: Reduce processing time from 5–6 years to 4–5 years to send benefit determinations to participants in defined benefit pension plans taken over by PBGC.

FY 1999: N/A

Results

FY 2002: This goal was not met. The average processing time was 3.3 years

FY 2001: This goal was achieved.

FY 2000: This goal was achieved.

FY 1999: N/A

Indicator

Timeliness of benefit determinations to participants in trusteed plans

Data Source

Participant Record Information System Manager

Baseline

FY 1997: 7 to 8 years

Comment

This measure addresses PBGC’s largest operating functions, which are processing terminated plans and paying benefits. Termination activities involve an intricate series of complex actions, from reviewing plan assets and participant data to completing financial and control group analysis. Sponsor bankruptcies and legal disputes over plan assets also complicate and stretch out the trusteeship process. Total participant count in PBGC-trusteed plans will have increased to 783,000 in FY 2002, while trusteed plans will have increased to 3087. Ultimately, faster case processing leads to increased accuracy of benefit payments.

Outcome Goal 2.3 — Increase Employment and Earnings for Retrained Workers

Performance Goal 2.3A — FY 2001 Annual Performance Plan

In Program Year 2001, of those registered under the WIA dislocated worker program, 73% will be employed in the first quarter after program exit, and 83% will be employed in the third quarter after program exit with 91% of pre-dislocation earnings.

PY 2000: Of those registered under the WIA dislocated worker program, 71.4% will be employed in the first quarter after program exit and 81.6% will be employed in the third quarter after program exit with 89.7% of pre-dislocation earnings.

PY 1999: Under JTPA Title III for dislocated workers, 74% of program terminees will be employed at an average wage replacement rate (compared to their wage at dislocation) of 93% at termination; 76% will be employed one quarter after program exit at an average wage replacement rate of 97%.

Results

PY 2001: The goal was achieved. The program achieved an entered employment rate of 78.9 percent, a six-month retention rate of 86.6 percent and an earnings replacement rate of 101 percent.

PY 2000: The goal was exceeded, based on the WIA Quarterly Performance Reports. The program achieved an entered employment rate of 75 percent, a six-month retention rate of 83 percent and an earnings replacement rate of 95 percent.

PY 1999: N/A

Indicator

Dislocated worker employment, employment retention, and earnings replacement

PY 2001:

  • 73% will be employed in the first quarter after program exit;
  • 83% of those employed in the first quarter after program exit will be employed in the third quarter after program exit; and
  • Those who are employed in the first quarter after program exit and are still employed in the third quarter after program exit will have 91% of their pre-dislocation earnings.

PY 2000:

  • 71% will be employed in the first quarter after program exit;
  • 82% of those employed in the first quarter after program exit will be employed in the third quarter after program exit; and
  • Those who are employed in the first quarter after program exit and are still employed in the third quarter after program exit will have 90% of their pre-dislocation earnings.

Data Source

Workforce Investment Act Standardized Record Data included in the Enterprise Information Management System and Unemployment Insurance Wage Records

Baseline

PY 2000, the first full year of Workforce Investment Act implementation, constitutes the baseline year for this measure. The performance measure is derived from the agreed upon levels of performance for all States. These measures will be regularly reviewed for appropriateness and rigor as performance data becomes available.

Comment

The Department, in collaboration with the Office of Management and Budget, is developing common performance measures for all employment and training programs. The purpose of this initiative is to develop common performance measures that address the goal of getting a job, job retention, and improved earnings for participants and costs in all affected programs. In FY 2003, the Department will begin the process of revising definitions of existing measures and reporting requirements consistent with existing laws so that the common measures may be implemented in Program Year 2004.

Performance Goal 2.3B — FY 2002 Annual Performance Plan

Increase the employment, retention, and earnings replacement of workers dislocated in important part because of trade and who receive trade adjustment assistance benefits.

Results

FY 2002: Based on preliminary data covering the first three quarters of FY 2002, the goal was not achieved. Sixty-six percent of participants were employed in the first quarter after program exit, and 89% of those were still employed in the third quarter after program exit with 81% of pre-dislocation wages.

FY 2001: The Department substantially met the goal. Sixty-six percent of participants were employed in the first quarter after exit, and 90 percent of those were still employed in the third quarter after program exit with an average of 88 percent of pre-dislocation wages.

FY 2000: N/A

FY 1999: N/A

Indicator

FY 2002:

  • 78% will be employed in the first quarter after program exit;
  • 88% of those employed in the first quarter after program exit will be employed in the third quarter after program exit; and
  • Those who are employed in the third quarter after program exit will earn, on average, 90% of their pre-separation earnings.

FY 2001:

  • 73% will be employed in the first quarter after program exit;
  • 80% of those employed in the first quarter after program exit will be employed in the third quarter after program exit; and
  • Those who are employed in the first quarter after program exit and are still employed in the third quarter after program exit will earn, on average, 82% of their pre-separation earnings.

FY 1999–FY 2000: N/A

Data Source

Trade Act Participant Report included in the Enterprise Information Management System

Baseline

FY 2001 constitutes the baseline year for this measure with 73% of workers employed in the first quarter after program exit, 80% of those employed in the first quarter after program exit showing earnings in the third quarter after program exit; and those employed in the third quarter after program exit earned, on average, 82% of their pre-separation earnings.

Comment

The current FY 1999–2004 Strategic Plan includes the new WIA goal based upon a weighted average of negotiated levels of performance for all States. The goals for PY 2000 and PY 2001 stated in this plan also reflect these negotiated levels for all States. The PY 2002 and 2003 goals have not yet been negotiated with the States, so the goal reflected is preliminary and continues the trend established by the PY 2000 – 2001 goals.

Strategic Goal 3—Quality Workplaces

Outcome Goal 3.1: Reduce Workplace Injuries, Illnesses, and Fatalities—Performance Goals

Performance Goal 3.1A

FY 2002: Reduce the number of mine fatalities by 15% and the mine non-fatal injury incidence rate by 17% below the projected baseline.

FY 2001: Reduce the number of mine fatalities and non-fatal injury rate to below the average for the previous five years.

FY 1999 – FY 2001: Reduce the number of mine fatalities and the non-fatal injury rate to below the average for the previous five years.

Results

FY 2002 – The goal was not met.

  • Fatalities: Baseline is 88 fatalities; Target = 64; Fatalities in FY 2002 = 71
  • Nonfatal-days-lost incidence rate: Baseline is 3.46 NFDL incidence rate; Target = 2.87; NFDL incidence rate FY 2002 = 3.15

FY 2001: The goal was exceeded.

  • Fatalities: Average FY 1996-2000 = 89; FY 2001 = 71
  • Nonfatal-days-lost incidence rate: Average FY 1996-2000 = 3.65; FY 2001 = 3.29

FY 2000: The goal was substantially achieved.

  • Fatalities: Average FY 1995-1999 = 89; FY 2000 = 88*
  • Nonfatal-days-lost incidence rate: Average FY 1995-1999 = 3.83; FY 2000 = 3.46
  • In August 2001, a fatality in FY 2000 was deemed not chargeable in the mining industry, thus reducing the number from 89 to 88.

FY 1999: The goal was achieved.

  • Fatalities: FY 1994–1998 Average = 92; FY 1999 = 82
  • Nonfatal-days-lost incidence rate: FY 1994–1998 Average = 4.07; FY 1999 = 3.50

Indicator

  • The number of mining fatalities.
  • The mining industry (nonfatal-days-lost) injury incidence rate.

Data Source

Mine Accident, Injury, and Employment information. Mine operators and contractors report to MSHA under Title 30 Code of Federal Regulations Part 50.

Baseline

Performance evaluation is based on actual numbers in FY 2000: Fatalities = 88; Nonfatal-days-lost incidence rate = 3.46.

Comment

For FY 2002, the goals, indicators and baselines were revised in order to create a greater impact towards lowering fatalities and injuries through partnerships with the mining community, states and MSHA.

Performance Goal 3.1B

FY 2002: Reduce the percentage of respirable coal dust samples exceeding the applicable standards by 5% for designated occupations and reduce the percentage of silica dust samples in metal and nonmetal mines exceeding the applicable standards by 5% for high risk occupations, and reduce the percentage of noise exposures above the citation level in all mines by 5%.

FY 2001: Reduce by 5% the percentage of coal dust and silica dust samples that are out of compliance for coal mines and metal and nonmetal high risk mining occupations, respectively.

FY 1999 – 2001: Reduce by 5% the percentage of coal dust and silica dust samples that are out of compliance for coal mines and metal and nonmetal high risk mining occupations, respectively.

Results

FY 2002: The goal was not achieved.

  • Coal Dust goal: Baseline - percent of samples over the applicable standard = 15%; Target = 14.2%; Actual = 15.0% of samples were over the applicable standard.
  • Silica Dust goal: Baseline - percent of samples exceeding the applicable standards = 9.3%; Target = 8.8%; Actual = 6.6% samples were over the applicable standard.
  • Noise Exposure goal: Baseline - percent of samples above the citation level = 9.0%; Target = 8.6%; Actual = 5.8% of samples were over the citation level.

FY 2001: The goal was achieved.

  • Coal dust goal: 5% reduction; Target = 11.1%; Actual = 10.2%
  • Silica dust goal: <80% index points; Actual = 64% index points

FY 2000: The goal was achieved.

  • Coal dust goal: 5% reduction; Target = 11.7%; Actual = 11.2% reduction
  • Silica dust goal: < 85% index points; Actual = 65.3% index points

FY 1999: The goal was achieved.

  • Coal dust goal: 5% reduction; Target = 12.4%; Actual = 11.4% reduction
  • Silica dust goal: <90% index points; Actual = 75.1% index points.

Indicator

Percent of samples out of compliance with the respirable coal mine dust standard for designated occupations and the percent of silica dust samples for high risk occupations that are out of compliance with the metal and nonmetal mines standard, and compliance with permissible level for noise in all mines.

Data Source

MSHA health, safety and compliance specialists collect dust samples. Coal Mine Safety and Health Management Information System and Metal and Nonmetal Mine Safety and Health Management Information System.

Baseline

Baselines are based on samples collected in FY 2001 for dust goals; FY 2000 and FY 2001 for noise goals.

Comment

Coal Dust: In early November 2001, MSHA established a new performance goal, beginning with FY 2002, to reduce by 5% per year (from FY 2001 baseline) the percentage of inspector Designated Occupation (DO) samples exceeding the applicable dust standard. Unlike the previous goal of reducing the frequency of exposures above the 2.0-mg/m3 standard, the new performance goal expanded coverage to all face workers, including those under a more stringent dust standard due to the presence of excessive levels of quartz dust, by reducing overexposures to both respirable dust and quartz. This change was made possible by the implementation of a new computer program designed to assign and store on the sample record in the applicable dust standard for the entity that each DO was sampled on. This new capability enabled MSHA to more easily monitor the frequency of sample results exceeding the applicable dust standard. According to the information contained in Coal Safety and Health Management Information System, 16.4% of the valid DO samples collected by MSHA in FY 2001 exceeded the applicable dust standard. This baseline, which was independently verified, was used to set the performance target of 15.6% for FY 2002 against which MSHA’s performance was measured during the year. Based on the year-end review in early October 2002, MSHA reported exceeding its target with 15% of DO samples being above the applicable standard. However, upon subsequent review of the FY 2001 data, a significant discrepancy was identified in the counts of samples exceeding the applicable standard from November 2001 when the FY 2002 baseline was originally established and November 2002. According to the data currently on the MIS database, 15% of the FY 2001 DO samples exceeded the applicable standard and not 16.4% as was previously reported. A recently completed analysis revealed that the original programming algorithms used to generate the baseline data were faulty and subsequently revised. This resulted in a change to the original FY 2001 baseline.

Noise: This is the first reporting year for noise goals. Previously, noise regulations applied to metal and nonmetal mines. New noise regulations in FY 2000 included all mines.

Performance Goal 3.1C — FY 2002 Annual Performance Plan

FY 2002: Reduce three of the most significant types of workplace injuries and causes of illnesses by 15% annually.

FY 2001: 11% [from baseline]

FY 2000: 7% [from baseline]

FY 1999: 3 % [from baseline]

Results

FY 2002: This goal was not achieved.
The goal was not achieved for silica and was achieved for lead and amputations.

  • Silica: Increased by 300%
  • Lead: Decreased by 69%
  • Amputations: Decreased by 24% (CY 1998-2000)

FY 2001: The goal was not achieved.

  • Silica: Decreased by 87%
  • Lead: Increased by 21%
  • Amputations: Decreased by 19% (CY 1997-1999)

FY 2000: The goal was achieved.

  • Silica: Decreased by 59%
  • Lead: Decreased by 36%
  • Amputations: Decreased by 17% (CY 1996-1998)

FY 1999: The goal was achieved.

  • Silica: Decreased by 70%
  • Lead: Decreased by 48%
  • Amputations: Decreased by 11% (CY 1995–1997)

Indicator

  • Silica: Percent change in average of the average silica exposure severity per inspection
  • Lead: Percent change in average of the average lead exposure severity per inspection
  • Amputations: Percent change in rate of amputations

Data Source

OSHA Integrated Management Information System (IMIS) (Silica and Lead)
Bureau of Labor Statistics Annual Survey of Occupational Injuries and Illnesses (Amputations)

Baseline

FY 2001- Silica: 1.2, Lead: 5.8
The baseline for amputations will be the CY 1999-2001 amputation rate.

Comment

Silica: OSHA measured the average of the average silica exposure in establishments where OSHA had silica-related inspections.
Lead: OSHA measured the average of the average lead exposure in establishments where OSHA had lead-related inspections.
Amputations: CY 2001 BLS Annual Survey of Occupational Injury and Illness characteristic data for amputations will be available in April 2003.

Performance Goal 3.1E — FY 2002 Annual Performance Plan

FY 2002: Reduce injuries and illnesses (LWDII) by 20% in at least 100,000 workplaces where OSHA initiates an intervention.

FY 2001: 75,000 workplaces

FY 2000: 50,000 workplaces

FY 1999: 25,000 workplaces

Results

FY 2002: The goal was achieved. Lost workday injury and illness (LWDII) rates were reduced in 110,000 workplaces. ***

FY 2001: The goal was achieved. Lost workday injury and illness (LWDII) rates were reduced in 88,850 workplaces. **

FY 2000: The goal was achieved. Lost workday injury and illness (LWDII) rates were reduced by 20% in 67,900 workplaces **

FY 1999: The goal was achieved. Lost workday injury and illness (LWDII) rates were reduced in 50,100 workplaces *

Indicator

The number of workplaces where OSHA intervened and (LWDII) rates were reduced by 20%

Data Source

OSHA Data Initiative (ODI)
OSHA Integrated Management Information System (IMIS)
Bureau of Labor Statistics Annual Survey of Occupational Injuries and Illnesses

Baseline

Tracking workplaces began with FY 1995 interventions. All workplaces where OSHA intervened and LWDII rates were reduced since FY 1995 will be counted towards the goal. Therefore, there is no need for a “baseline.”

Comment

* Results based on an analysis conducted by researchers from the University of Pittsburgh and Clark University.

** Results based on an analysis conducted by a researcher from Clark University. The researcher examined injury and illness data of establishments that had inspections, consultations, or high injury/illness rate notification letters. The study analyzed prior and post-intervention injury and illness rates for selected interventions. From these, the researcher projected the number of workplaces with selected interventions during FY 1995 - FY 2001 where rates declined by 20% or more.

*** Results based on methodology developed by a researcher from Clark University for workplaces having received an intervention that took place between FY 1995 and the end of FY 2001.

Performance Goal 3.1F — FY 2001 Annual Performance Plan

FY 2001: Decrease fatalities in the construction industry by 11% [from baseline], by focusing on the four leading causes of fatalities (falls, struck-by, crushed-by, and electrocutions and electrical injuries).

FY 2000: 7% [from baseline]

FY 1999: 3% [from baseline]

Results

FY 2002: This goal was substantially achieved. The Calendar Year (CY) 2001 fatality rate (the latest data available) declined by 9.5 percent from the baseline.

FY 2001: The goal was substantially achieved. Fatalities decreased by 9.5% (CY 2001).

FY 2000: The goal was achieved. Fatalities decreased by 11% (CY 2000).

FY 1999: The goal was not achieved. Fatalities decreased by 2% (CY 1997–1999).

Indicator

Percent change in the rate of fatalities

Data Source

Previous: Bureau of Labor Statistics Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries

Baseline

Previous: 14.5 per 100,000 workers for CY 1993-1995
Current: 14.7 per 100,000 workers for CY 1995

Comment

* CY 2002 BLS fatality data will be available in August, 2003.

Goal 3.1G — FY 2001 Annual Performance Plan

FY 2001: Reduce injuries and illnesses by 15% at work sites engaged in voluntary, cooperative relationships with DOL.*

FY 2000: N/A

FY 1999: N/A

Results

FY 2001: This goal was achieved. There was a 47% reduction in injuries and illnesses.*

Indicator

The average percent change in injury and illness rates at worksites engaged in voluntary, cooperative relationships with DOL

Data Source

VPP Automated Data System (VADS)
OSHA Data Initiative (ODI)
Integrated Management Information System (IMIS)
Safety and Health Achievement Recognition Program (SHARP) data base

Baseline

The VPP baseline was defined as three years prior to a worksite’s initial approval and the SHARP baseline as one year prior to a worksite’s initial consultation visit

Comment

* Results based on an analysis conducted by a researcher at Clark University. The analysis included the Voluntary Protection Program (VPP) and the Safety and Health Achievement Recognition Program (SHARP) worksites in Federal OSHA enforcement jurisdictions that were active in FY 2001 and had baseline and follow-up incidence rate data. This goal was dropped because it is a strategy to reduce injuries and illnesses. It continues to be monitored at the agency level.

Outcome Goal 3.2 Foster Equal Opportunity Workplaces—Performance Goals

Performance Goal 3.2A — FY 2002 Annual Performance Plan

FY 2002: Federal contractors achieve equal opportunity workplaces as demonstrated by:
(1) Improving the equal employment opportunity performance of federal contractors and subcontractors within industries where data indicate the likelihood of equal employment opportunity problems is greatest. In FY 2002, contractors in SIC Group 50 and SIC Group 87 that participate in specified DOL/OFCCP compliance assistance activities and are subsequently evaluated will have:

  1. Better EEO performance in selection system evaluations (as indicated by less severe CMS closure types) than contractors in SIC Groups 50 and 87 that did not participate in specified DOL/OFCCP compliance assistance activities. In FY 2002, DOL/OFCCP will improve by 1 percent the rate of compliance findings over the baseline for SIC 50 and SIC 87.
  2. Better EEO performance in selection system evaluations (as indicated by less severe violations or deficiencies) than contractors in SIC Groups 50 and 87 that did not participate in specified DOL/OFCCP compliance assistance activities. In FY 2002, DOL/OFCCP will reduce by 1 percent the rate of findings of severe violations from the baseline for SIC 50 and SIC 87.
  3. Better EEO performance in selection system evaluations (as indicated by evaluation type) than contractors in SIC Groups 50 and 87 that did not participate in specified DOL/OFCCP compliance assistance activities. In FY 2002, DOL/OFCCP will increase by 1 percent the rate of focused and offsite compliance evaluation types over the baseline for SIC 50 and SIC 87.

(2) Improving the equal employment opportunity performance of federal contractors and subcontractors that have had prior contact with DOL/OFCCP through evaluations, outreach, or technical assistance. In FY 2002: Contractors and subcontractors that are selected for evaluation, outreach, or compliance assistance activities will have:

  1. Better EEO performance in selection system evaluations (as indicated by less severe CMS closure types) than contractors that did not have prior contact with DOL/OFCCP. In FY 2002, DOL/OFCCP will improve by 1 percent the rate of compliance findings over the baseline for all supply and service closures.
  2. Better EEO performance in selection system evaluations (as indicated by less severe violations or deficiencies) than contractors that did not have prior contact with DOL/OFCCP. In FY 2002, DOL/OFCCP will reduce by 1 percent the rate of findings of severe violations from the baseline.
  3. Better EEO performance in selection system evaluations (as indicated by evaluation type) than contractors that did not have prior contact with DOL/OFCCP. In FY 2002, DOL/OFCCP will increase by 1 percent the rate of focused and offsite compliance evaluation types over the baseline.

FY 2001: Identify those industries where data indicate the likelihood of equal employment opportunity problems is greatest and establish baselines; establish baselines for contractors and subcontractors that have had prior contact with DOL/OFCCP through evaluations, outreach or technical assistance; and establish baselines for reducing compensation discrimination by federal contractors and subcontractors.

FY 1999 - FY 2000: N/A.

Results

FY 2002: This goal was achieved. Results for the indicators are:

(1)
a. 1. The indicator was achieved. The baseline for SIC 50 (wholesale trade of durable goods) is a 50.9 percent rate of compliance findings; the FY 2002 total is 58.43 percent, an increase of 7.53 percentage points

a. 2. The indicator was achieved The baseline for SIC 87 (engineering and other professional services) is a 49.60 percent rate of compliance findings; the FY 2002 total is 64.48 percent, an increase of 14.88 percentage points.

b. 1. The indicator was achieved. The baseline for violation severity is 7.69 percent for SIC 50; the FY 2002 total is 2.25 percent, a decrease of 5.44 percentage points.

b. 2. The indicator was achieved. The baseline for violation severity is 9.02 percent for SIC 87; the FY 2002 total is 1.64 percent, a decrease of 7.38 percentage points.

c. 1. The indicator was achieved. The baseline for focused and offsite evaluations is 36.50 percent for SIC 50; the FY 2002 total is 52.80 percent, an increase of 16.30 percentage points.

c. 2. The indicator was achieved. The baseline for focused and offsite evaluations is 27.80 percent for SIC 87; the FY 2002 total is 50.82 percent, an increase of 23.02 percentage points.

(2)
a. The indicator was achieved. The baseline for compliance for all supply and service closures is 52.90 percent; the FY 2002 total is 62.91 percent, an increase of 10.01 percentage points.

b. The indicator was achieved. The baseline for violation severity is 9.80 percent; the FY 2002 total is 2.71 percent, a decrease of 7.09 percentage points.

c. The indicator was achieved. The baseline for focused and offsite evaluations is 34.10 percent; the FY 2002 total is 49.80 percent, an increase of 15.70 percentage points.

FY 2001: The goal was not achieved. For the first indicator, two industries were identified where the data indicate the likelihood of equal employment opportunity problems is greatest, and baselines indicating the extent of problems previously found were established. With regard to the second indicator, the Department established a baseline for Federal contractors and subcontractors that had failed previous compliance evaluations, but not for those contacted only through outreach or technical assistance. The Department did not develop a separate baseline for compensation discrimination, but included this issue in the baselines created for the preceding two indicators.

FY 1999 – FY 2000: N/A.

Indicator

Trends/changes in compliance and violation rates and EEO-1 data. Trends/changes in data gathered from evaluations and from Federal contractors. Trends/changes in data gathered from customer satisfaction surveys.

Data Source

EEO-1 data file; Case Management System; Federal contractors’ data; customer satisfaction survey; compliance evaluations of scheduled contractors and of those within certain industries; Compliance Assistance Project reports.

Baseline

FY 2001:

(1)

  1. The baseline for SIC 50 is a 50.9 percent rate of compliance findings and the baseline for SIC 87 is a 49.6 percent rate of compliance findings.
  2. The baseline for violation severity is 7.69 percent for SIC 50 and 9.02 percent for SIC 87.
  3. The baseline for focused and offsite evaluations is 36.5 percent for SIC 50 and 27.8 percent for SIC 87.

(2)

  1. The baseline for compliance for all supply and service closures is 52.9 percent.
  2. The baseline for violation severity is 9.8 percent.
  3. The baseline for focused and offsite evaluation types is 34.1 percent.

Comment

All indicators for selected contractors were achieved, suggesting that the strategy adopted by OFFCP based on evaluating contractors in industries that may have had entrenched equal employment opportunity problems was successful. OFCCP will continue its compliance assistance initiative to encourage employers to comply with OFCCP’s federal contractor mandates and regulations. In the long run, severe violations will decline relative to the baseline as contractors come to realize that they are being deprived of the use of a valuable segment of the labor force.

Performance Goal 3.2B — FY 2002 Annual Performance Plan

FY 2002: States that receive DOL financial assistance under the Workforce Investment Act provide benefits and services in a nondiscriminatory manner as evidenced by:

  • The issuance, within 180 days of the initial submission* of a State’s Methods of Administration (MOA), of a compliance determination or a conciliation agreement** which indicates that the MOA gives reasonable guarantee that benefits and services are provided in a nondiscriminatory manner.
  • A strengthening of working relationships with state agencies, through their participation in a strategy of improving compliance assistance for One Stop Centers, and assessing the effectiveness of that strategy.

FY 2001: DOL grant recipients and programs financially assisted under the Workforce Investment Act achieve equal opportunity workplaces as demonstrated by:

  • Timely submission as required by 29 CFR 37 of 30 Methods of Administration (MOA), or in the absence of timely submissions, the issuance of a “Show Cause Notice” within 15 days of a non-timely submission.
  • Issuance of compliance determinations or conciliation agreements within 180 days for those States submitting timely MOA's.

FY 2000: Deferred until FY 2001

FY 1999: Issue final regulations implementing the nondiscrimination provisions of Section 188 of WIA by August 7, 1999.

Results

FY 2002: This goal was achieved. The Department issued timely compliance determinations or entered into conciliation agreements within 180 days, and also strengthened working relationships with state agencies.

FY 2001: This goal was not achieved.

FY 2000: Deferred until FY 2001

FY 1999: The goal was not met.

Indicator

  • Number of State MOA’s not previously approved as of September 30, 2001.
  • Number of compliance determinations issued within 180 days.
  • Number of conciliation agreements issued within 180 days.
  • Instrument for assessing accessibility of One Stop Centers to persons with disabilities is in place, through cooperative effort with state agencies.

Data Source

  • Methods of Administration Agreement signed by States, Compliance Determinations, and Conciliation Agreements.
  • CRC evaluation instrument.

Baseline

  • All remaining State MOA’s not previously approved as of September 30, 2001.
  • Compliance Review Instrument will be developed in FY 2002.

Comment

* For FY 2002, “initial” date of receipt of MOA’s, for the purpose counting the 180 days, is the date of submission of the revised MOA.

** For the purpose of counting the due date for conciliation agreements (CA), a determination will be made within 180 days whether it will be necessary to enter into a CA, and the CA will be finalized within 210 days of receipt of the revised MOA. The additional 30 days is necessary, since under the current interpretation of our regulations, we must give the recipients the full 180 days after submission to attempt to get an approved MOA. CRC is then giving itself 30 days to negotiate and finalize a conciliation agreement. Noncompliance with MOA requirements can result in the withdrawal of grant funds. The second indicator calls for the development of an instrument for assessing accessibility to persons with disabilities in collaboration with state workforce agencies. During FY2003, this instrument will be used to assess the baseline level of accessibility at targeted One Stop Centers, and then to assess the effectiveness of efforts to improve accessibility through targeted compliance assistance.

Outcome Goal 3.3: Reduce Exploitation of Child Labor and Address Core International Labor Standards Issues

Performance Goal 3.3A — FY 2002 Annual Performance Plan

FY 2002: Reduce exploitative child labor by promoting international efforts and targeting focused initiatives in selected countries.

FY 2001: Same as FY 2002.

FY 2000: Reduce exploitative child labor worldwide by increasing international support and funding the most promising programs and projects in targeted countries.

FY 1999: N/A

Results

FY 2002: The goal was fully achieved.

  1. 29 countries have ratified Convention No. 182 on the Worst Forms of Child Labor, of which 10 are participating in USDOL funded IPEC projects.
  2. 13 countries have adopted 15 action plans to combat child labor and/or promote access to basic education for child laborers or children at risk.
  3. 103,772 children were targeted for prevention and removal of exploitative work through the funding on new DOL-IPEC programs.
  4. 51,922 children have been prevented or removed from exploitative work through the provision of education or training opportunities in ongoing DOL-IPEC programs.
  5. Education projects were funded in 9 countries, through DOL’s Child Labor Education Initiative.

FY 2001: The goal was not fully achieved. Of the indicators, two were exceeded, a third was substantially achieved and a fourth not met:

FY 2000: The goal was achieved.

FY 1999: N/A

Indicator

  1. 15 countries will ratify International Labor Organization (ILO) Convention 182 on Worst Forms of Child Labor.
  2. 10 countries will establish action plans to combat child labor and/or promote access to basic education for child laborers or children at risk.
  3. 90,000 children in developing countries will be targeted for prevention or removal from exploitative work, particularly its worst forms (as defined in ILO Convention 182) through the funding of new DOL-IPEC programs.
  4. 50,000 children in developing countries will be prevented or removed from exploitative work through the provision of education or training opportunities in ongoing DOL-IPEC programs.
  5. Education projects for child laborers through the Education Initiative will begin in 8 countries.

Data Source

ILO/IPEC and DOL/ILAB

Baseline

  1. In FY 2001, 63 countries ratified ILO Convention 182. In total, 100 countries have ratified ILO Convention 182.
  2. In FY 2001, 13 countries established a total of 15 action plans to eliminate child labor. Eleven of these plans were developed as part of a DOL-funded ILO/IPEC program.
  3. In FY 2001, approximately 200,000 children were targeted for prevention and removal from exploitative work through the funding of new ILO/IPEC projects. Target populations are established after an initial needs assessment and identified in DOL-approved project documents. In total, more than 400,000 children have been targeted for prevention and removal from exploitative work through DOL-funded ILO/IPEC projects (FY 1995-2001).
  4. In FY 2001, more than 25,800 children were removed or prevented from exploitative work through the provision of education or training opportunities. In total, approximately 66,000 children have actually been prevented or removed for exploitative work on-going DOL-funded ILO/IPEC projects (FY 1995-2001).
  5. The baseline is zero for the education projects, as 2002 is the first year DOL will be funding programs through the Child Labor Education Initiative.

Comment

Throughout the 1990s, international recognition of the child labor problem and action to address it has been increasing. While there is still a high incidence of child labor in many developing countries, various governmental and non-governmental organizations are taking steps to remove children from exploitative work. This increased commitment to the eradication of child labor is evident by the unanimous adoption of the ILO Convention 182 on the Worst Forms of Child Labor in Geneva in June 1999.

Performance Goal 3.3B — FY 2002 Annual Performance Plan

FY 2002: Advance workers’ protections and economic status in developing countries.

FY 2001: Raise workers’ protection and the safety of work places in selected countries by improving core labor standards and social safety net programs.

FY 2000: Raise workers’ protection and the safety of work places in selected countries by improving core labor standards and social safety net programs.

FY 1999: N/A

Results

FY 2002: The goal was fully achieved. Stakeholders in approximately 41 countries and territories made commitments to implement new projects designed to promote and implement core labor standards or to expand already-existing ones. Stakeholders in approximately 49 countries and territories made commitments to implement new projects designed to improve economic opportunities and income security for workers or to expand already-existing ones.

FY 2001: The goal was achieved as both performance indicators were met.

FY 2000: The goal was substantially achieved. Three of four performance indicators were met or exceeded.

FY 1999: N/A

Indicator

  • 7 countries commit to undertake improvements in assuring compliance and implementation of core labor standards.
  • 6 project countries will commit with DOL assistance to improve economic opportunities and income security for workers.

Data Source

ILO Reports; reports by government and nongovernmental organizations; project reports

Baseline

Current level of implementation

Comment

As the Department’s early projects (those begun in FY2000) become well established, it will become possible to start evaluating the human and economic impact of the projects. Future goals and indicators will focus on the effects the projects have had on their intended beneficiaries – whether or not there has been actual improvement in the application of core labor standards or in economic opportunities and income security for workers – rather than focusing on how many countries commit to these goals.

Baseline data were scheduled to be collected by September 30, 2002, after which DOL would set targets for each indicator. FY2003 will be the first year in which DOL will report on these impact indicators.

Department Management Goals

Outcome Goal FM: Maintain the Integrity and Stewardship of the Department’s Financial Resources

Performance Goal FM1 — FY 2002 Annual Performance Plan

FY 2002: All DOL financial systems meet the standards set in the Federal Financial Management Improvement Act (FFMIA) and the Government Management Reform Act (GMRA).

FY 2001: Same as FY 2002.

FY 2000: All of DOL financial systems meet the standards or have prepared corrective action plans to meet the standard by FY 2000.

FY 1999: DOL financial systems and procedures either meet the “substantial compliance” standard as prescribed in the Federal Financial Management Improvement Act (FFMIA) or corrective actions are scheduled to promptly correct material weaknesses identified.

Results

FY 2002: The goal was achieved.

FY 2001: The goal was achieved.

FY 2000: The goal was substantially achieved.

FY 1999: The goal was achieved.

Indicator

Percentage of financial systems compliant with the Acts

Data Source

OIG audit opinion in Accountability Report

Baseline

Systems in Compliance by Fiscal Year - FY 1997: 8 of 14 (57%); FY 1998: 9 of 14 (64%); FY 1999: 17 of 22 (77%); FY 2000: 15 of 17 (88%); FY 2001: 17 of 17 (100%).

Comment

This goal will be combined with FM2 for FY 2003 and 2004.

Performance Goal FM2 — FY 2002 Annual Performance Plan

FY 2002: DOL meets all new accounting standards issued by the Federal Accounting Systems Advisory Board (FASAB) including the Managerial Cost Accounting Standard.

FY 2001: Same as FY 2002.

FY 2000: DOL meets all current FASAB standards

FY 1999: N/A

Results

FY 2002: The goal was achieved.

FY 2001: The goal was achieved.

FY 2000: The goal was achieved.

FY 1999: N/A

Indicator

Percentage of accounting standards met

Data Source

OIG audit opinion in Accountability Report

Baseline

The standard has been met in each year since FY 1997.

Comment

This goal will be combined with FM1 for FY 2003 and 2004.

Outcome Goal IT: Improve Organizational Performance and Communication through Effective Deployment of IT Resources

Performance Goal IT1 — FY 2002 Annual Performance Plan

FY 2002: Improve automated access to administrative and program systems, services and information.

FY 2000–2001: Increase integration of DOL IT systems and extend access to automated services

FY1999: N/A

Results

FY 2002: This goal was substantially achieved with five of six indicators met. DOL:

  1. Successfully implemented a common office automation suite of software DOL-wide.
  2. Successfully replaced remote terminal network interfaces with integrated DOL-wide interfaces.
  3. Successfully implemented 27 DOL Public Web Site topical and client-targeted web interfaces.
  4. Increased the number of DOL Public Web Site users by 24.15%.
  5. Did not reduce the number of page hits users traversed to obtain the information they sought by 5%. Page views per session decreased by 1.83%.
  6. Improved user satisfaction results from the Internet Customer Satisfaction Survey from the previous year for an average score of 3 or better.

FY 2001: This goal was achieved

FY 2000: This goal was achieved.

FY 1999: N/A

Indicator

  1. Common office automation suite of software DOL-wide (ITC)
  2. The Remote Terminal Network (RTN) replaced (ITC)
  3. Implement 15 DOL Public Web Site topical and client-targeted web interfaces. (ASP)
  4. Increase the number of DOL Public Web Site users by 5%. (ASP)
  5. Reduce the number of page hits users must traverse to obtain the information they seek by 5%. (ASP)
  6. Improve the user satisfaction results from the Internet Customer Satisfaction Survey to average score of 3 or better. (ASP)

Data Source

  1. Agency reports.
  2. Network inventory monitoring.
  3. Progress reports to the IMG.
  4. Webtrends Usage Reports.
  5. Webtrends Usage Reports.
  6. Internet Customer Satisfaction Survey Results.

Baseline

FY 2001: DOL does not have a common office automation suite of software DOL-wide.

FY 2001: The RTN is fully operational.

FY2000: Zero topical and client-targeted web interfaces.

FY2000: Average monthly user sessions: 2,732,919. Average monthly page hits: 14, 366,961.

FY 2001: Baseline to be established.

FY 2000: Average customer satisfaction usability results: 4.05
(Scale: 1=Exactly, 5=Not At All)

Outcome Goal HR: Establish DOL as a Model Workplace—Performance Goals

Performance Goal HR1 — FY 2002 Annual Performance Plan

FY 2002: The right people are in the right place at the right time to carry out the mission of the Department.

  1. The DOL workforce is a prepared and competent workforce.
  2. The DOL workforce is a diverse workforce.
  3. Human capital policies and plans promote a citizen-centered and results oriented government consistent with the President's Management Agenda.

FY 2001: N/A

FY 2000: N/A

Results

FY 2002: The goal was not met. Performance met or exceeded targeted levels for four of six performance indicators. One indicator was substantially achieved. One indicator was not met.

A1) Ninety four percent of selecting officials indicated satisfaction with the quality of job applicants.

A2) Baselines for key professional occupations identified in agency restructuring plans with retention problems were established.

A3) Competency models were established for 10 of 35 mission critical occupations, and additional models are being developed for another 8 occupations.

B1 and B2) Diversity improved throughout the Department. In professional and technical occupations, representation improved in about 30% of the 34 under-represented occupational-ethnic groupings, and two achieve the goal of meeting their representation in the civilian labor force. Representation also improved overall for women and Asian and Pacific Islanders, while remaining steady for blacks and Hispanics.

C1) Out of ten program agencies rated in FY 2001, 6 (60%) showed improvement for FY 2002. Two agencies received green ratings, while the remaining 8 all received yellow ratings.

FY 1999-2001: N/A

Indicator

A1) 90% of managers indicate satisfaction with the quality of applicants referred for their vacancies.

A2) Baselines for key professional occupations identified in agency restructuring plans with retention problems are established.

A3) Core competencies for DOL mission critical occupations are established.

B1) Improvement will be realized in 30% of diversity indicators for professional occupations exhibiting under-representation in FY 2001.

B2) Continued improvement is realized in the extent to which diversity in the DOL workforce reflects the civilian labor force.

C1) Improve Human Capital Standards scores for at least 20% of DOL agencies, above baseline established in FY 2001.

Data Source

A1) Survey of selecting officials

A2) DOL HR Information System and Agency restructuring plans

A3) Agency strategic, workforce and recruitment plans; employee performance and development plans

B1) DOL HR Information System and AEP reports

B2) DOL HR Information System and/or CPDF Data aligned with Census Data to reflect overall DOL representation rates for the six protected groups

C1) OMB Human Capital Standards Scorecard

Baseline

A1) To be established in FY 2002

A2) To be established in FY 2002

A3) To be established in FY 2002

B1) To be established in FY 2002

B2) In FY 2000, 49.7% of workforce were women, 24.2% black, 6.9% Hispanic, 3.3% Asian/PI, and 0.7% Native American, 6.4% persons with disabilities, and 1.2% persons with targeted disabilities.

C1) 1 green 4 yellow, and 5 red ratings for agencies in FY 2001.

Comment

The following factors may affect the ability to attain the above goal: DOL’s budget; changes in recruitment and hiring procedures; introduction of new recruitment flexibilities; computer access to programs and services to all DOL employees.

The OMB Human Capital Standards referenced in C1 measure performance on a number of indicators, including overall human capital strategies, citizen-centered organizational structures, workforce performance, and workforce competencies.

Performance Goal HR2 – FY 2002 Annual Performance Plan

FY 2002: Reduce the rate of lost production days by two percent (i.e., number of days employees spend away from work due to work related injuries and illnesses).

FY 2000-2001: Same as FY 2002.

FY 1999: N/A

Results

FY 2002: This goal was achieved. The rate of lost production days due to work related accidents and injuries decreased by 22.7 percent.

Indicator

FY 2001: The goal was not achieved. The Department’s rate of lost production days increased by 8.65 percent.

FY 2000: The goal was not achieved. The Department’s rate of lost production was reduced by 0.05 percent to 57.1 days per 100 employees.

FY 1999: N/A

Percent decrease in rate of lost production days (target is 2%)

Data Source

OWCP Table 2 Reports and personnel data from DOL’s Office of Budget.
OWCP Charge Back System data.

Baseline

Baseline for lost production days was set for all Federal Agencies by OWCP. FY 2001 is the baseline year. DOL’s FY 2001 rate is 64.7 lost production days per 100 employees.

Comment

Factors that influence achieving the above goal: DOL resources for the number and training of workers compensation coordinators; DOL agencies’ commitment to using flexibilities available to return injured employees to work; OWCP caseload.

Performance Goal HR3 – FY 2002 Annual Performance Plan

FY 2002: Reduce the overall occurrence of work related injuries and illnesses for DOL employees by three percent, and improve the timeliness of filing injury/illness claims by five percent.

FY 2000-2001: Same as FY 2002.

FY 1999: N/A

Results

FY 2002: This goal was achieved. DOL targeted reducing injuries and illnesses to 3.38 cases per 100 employees while filing 62.4 percent of claims with OWCP in a timely manner. The Department met the injury/illness target with a rate of 2.98 per 100 employees, and filed 77.2 percent of claims on time, exceeding the target by 14.8 percentage points. This performance represents a significant turn-around for the Department in providing a safer, healthier work environment for employees (7 percent improvement over FY 2001) and securing medical and income replacement benefits in a timely manner (40 percent improvement compared to FY 2001 performance).

FY 2001: The goal of 3.49 injuries/illness per 100 employees was not achieved. The injury/illness rate for DOL employees was 3.63 injuries/illnesses per 100 employees. The goal of 57.4% of injury/illness claims filed on time was also not achieved. Timeliness of filing injury/illness claim forms in FY 2001 was 55.1%.

FY 2000: Results for this goal have changed. The Annual Report indicated that this goal (3.6 cases per 100 employees) had not been achieved. More current and accurate data indicate that this goal was achieved and the FY 2000 injury and illness rate was 3.5 cases per 100 employees, a reduction of 5.7%. DOL also significantly improved the timeliness of filing injury claims, improving to 57.3% from the previous baseline of 47.4%.

FY 1999: N/A

Indicator

  1. Percent decrease in total case rate of work related illnesses and injuries (target is 3%).
  2. Increase in timeliness of reporting new injuries (target is 5%).

Data Source

  1. OWCP Table 2 Reports and personnel data from DOL’s Office of Budget.
  2. OWCP time lag reports for federal agencies for submission of claims forms CA-1 and CA-2 within 10 working days or 14 calendar days.

Baseline

  1. Initial baseline injury and illness rate is 3.71 cases per 100 employees based on 1997 OWCP data.
  2. Initial baseline for timeliness of filing is 47.4% based on 1998 OWCP data.

Comment

Factors that influence achieving the injury/illness rate goal: maintaining continued focus of DOL agency managers on actions to reduce injury rates; DOL resources for training managers, supervisors, and employees how to identify, avoid, and correct hazards in the workplace. Factor that influenced exceeding the timeliness goal: instituting electronic workers’ compensation claims filing.

Outcome Goal PR: Improve Procurement Management — Performance Goals

Performance Goal PR1 — FY 2002 Annual Performance Plan

FY 2002: Complete public-private or direct conversion competitions on not less than the five percent of the FTE listed on the DOL’s Federal Activities Inventory Reform Act (FAIR) listings.

FY 1999-2001: N/A

Results

FY 2002: DOL exceeded its FY 2002 goal through direct conversion of more than 150 FTE.

FY 1999 – FY 2001: N/A

Indicator

Percentage of commercial FTE on the Department’s 2000 FAIR inventory included in completed competitions or direct conversions

Data Source

DOL Federal Activities Inventory Reform (FAIR) Act Inventory.
Completed A-76 public-private competitions.
Completed direct conversions to contract of DOL commercial FTE

Baseline

FY 2000 FTE listings.

Comment

DOL directly converted to contract the commercial work performed by the equivalent of 150 full time employees (FTE). This exceeds DOL’s FY 2002 competitive sourcing goal by 10 FTE.

Performance Goal PR2 — FY 2002 Annual Performance Plan

FY 2002: Award contracts over $25,000 using Performance-Based Contracting Services (PBSC) techniques for not less than 20 percent of total eligible service contracting dollars.

FY 1999 - 2001: N/A

Results

FY 2002: This goal was substantially achieved. DOL used performance-based service contracting techniques for 18 percent of total eligible service contracting dollars.

FY 1999 – 2001: N/A

Indicator

Dollar Value of Performance-Based Service Contracts awarded out of Service Contracts over $25,000.

Data Source

Federal Procurement Data System

Baseline

DOL Annual Acquisition Plan

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