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Secretary of Labor Thomas E. Perez
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FY 2003 Performance Goals, Strategies and Cross-Cutting Programs

4.      FY 2003 Performance Goals, Strategies and Cross-Cutting Programs

This FY 2003 Annual Performance Plan establishes performance goals that will lead to the accomplishment of DOL’s strategic goals and describes the means and strategies DOL will use to reach those goals.  The plan consolidates or aggregates the Department’s activities into logical clusters within each strategic goal.  For example, the third strategic goal, Quality Workplaces, integrates the outcomes of OSHA’s and MSHA’s performance goals into one outcome goal --  to reduce workplace injuries and illnesses.  In other cases, only one agency within the Department may contribute to a specific outcome goal.

This chapter is divided into three sections, one for each strategic goal.  The introduction to each strategic goal lists the outcome goals associated with the strategic goal and also provides the budget authority and outlays figures for that goal for FY 1999 to FY 2003.  These figures are aggregations of outcome goal budget authority and outlays figures, which are described below.  The strategic goal introductions highlight the Secretary’s areas of emphasis and the role of key performance goals and strategies in achieving these priorities.

For each outcome goal, we provide budget authority and outlays figures for FY 1999 to FY 2003.  The method for assigning full costs in terms of budget authority and outlays to the outcome goals mirrors that used by the Office of the Chief Financial Officer in the allocation of costs to outcome goals in the Department’s financial statement.  While the financial statement ascribes costs at the Agency level, this plan uses the budget activity level as the unit of analysis for analyzing the deployment of resources.  Agencies estimated the proportion of their spending that contributed directly to the accomplishment of outcome goals for each of the five years covered by this plan.  These factors were applied to the net budget authority and outlay figures contained in the budget request.  Indirect costs for program support activities were added to agency budget authority and outlay figures based on usage estimates.  As such, spending for the Departmental Management Program Direction and Support activity, the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Administration and Management and the Office of the Chief Financial Officer are scored against the accomplishment of the outcome goals.  Charges for centrally administered administrative services billed through the Working Capital Fund are included in the agency budget activity figures and are likewise scored against the outcome goals.

Following the budget figures are the performance goals and their associated means, strategies, and cross-cutting programs.  Appendix A displays individual matrices for each performance goal that include the following information:

Results: The most recent results available for the performance goal.

Indicator: The measures that will be used to assess progress towards performance goal accomplishment.

Data Source: The measurement system(s) that will be used to collect performance indicator data.

Baseline: The baseline year and baseline level against which progress will be evaluated.

Comment: Issues related to goal accomplishment, measurement systems, and strategies that provide a context or description of the performance goal or indicator.

4.1       DOL Strategic Goal 1—A Prepared Workforce

DOL STRATEGIC GOAL 1

A PREPARED WORKFORCE
Enhance opportunities for America's workforce

OUTCOME GOALS:

  • Increase employment, earnings, and assistance
  • Increase the number of youth making a successful transition to work·
  • Improve the effectiveness of information and analysis on the U.S. economy

Total Funds for This Goal (in Billions):

Fiscal Years Budget Authority Outlays
FY 2003 $ 5.4 $ 6.2
FY 2002 $ 6.1 $ 6.8
FY 2001 $ 6.0 $ 6.2
FY 2000 $ 5.5 $ 5.3
FY 1999 $ 7.0 $ 5.4

The Department of Labor’s programs and agencies with the primary operational responsibility for achieving this strategic goal include the Employment and Training Administration’s Workforce Investment Act (WIA) and Wagner-Peyser Act programs, the Office of Disability Employment Policy, the Veterans’ Employment and Training Service (VETS), and the Bureau of Labor Statistics. In addition, the Women’s Bureau (WB), the Office of Faith-Based and Community Initiatives (OFBCI), the Office of the 21st Century Workforce, the Office of the Solicitor, the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Administration and Management, and the Office of Inspector General provide indirect support to this strategic goal.

Under the Workforce Investment Act, the performance indicators stipulated in the Act are developed through a process of negotiation between the States and the Department of Labor. The new Workforce Investment System has led to a retooling of the Employment and Training Administration’s (ETA) performance goals. ETA consulted with stakeholders concerning performance and accountability issues and worked in partnership to develop revised performance goals for Program Year 2002 (PY 2002), which serve as the basis for the PY 2003 goals. The national performance goals for the WIA performance indicators represent an amalgamation of the goals negotiated with the States.

Similarly, both ETA and the Veterans’ Employment and Training Service have established performance measures for the public labor exchange administered as part of the One-Stop delivery systems of the states.  Modeling the process for establishing State performance goals for WIA, ETA and VETS are partnering with states to develop a process for negotiating expected levels of performance for State public labor exchange systems.

Grants to the States under WIA provide employment and training activities for adults that increase the employment, retention, and earnings of participants and increase their occupational skill attainment to enhance life-long career opportunities. Activities include occupational skill training, job placement and support services through the One-Stop Career system.

Performance goals for State grants for adult services directly relate to the Secretary’s emphasis on ensuring effective, results-oriented job training through DOL and other programs. The FY 2003 goals set benchmarks for the economic results (i.e., employment, earnings and retention) achieved through job training and other employment-related assistance.

DOL policies that guide the implementation of State grant services to adults underscore the importance of directing training efforts to meet the skill needs of the 21st Century, especially with respect to countering skill shortages in information technology and other high-tech fields. This focus on training to meet emerging skill demands supports the Secretary’s emphasis on re-orienting the Department’s programs to meet the needs of the 21st Century workforce. Also, the mechanisms by which economic results for adult program customers are achieved (e.g., Individual Training Accounts (ITAs), Eligible Training Provider (ETP) lists, and consumer reports) support the Secretary’s emphasis on fostering competition, accountability, and transparency in relevant Department grant programs.

The Department’s “youth portfolio” under WIA includes State formula-funded grants, Youth Opportunity Grants, and Job Corps, all designed to help low income youth acquire the education, skills, work experience, and support they need to transition to careers and a productive adulthood.  These programs prepare young people for the 21st Century Workforce by providing a comprehensive array of services that include preparing youth with the skills they need for successful employment; improving educational attainment; providing supportive services; and helping develop the potential of youth as citizens and leaders.  The Youth Opportunity grants are dedicated to increasing the long-term employment of youth who live in high-poverty urban and rural areas and Native American Reservations.  Job Corps’ full-time, residential education and training program will be even further enhanced under the new agreement between the Departments of Labor and Education which will offer a number of strategies to increase the number of Job Corps graduates who obtain their high school diplomas. This joint project will include developing a Job Corps distance learning/national high school system while maintaining strong content standards.

Through the New Freedom Initiative, the Department will assist the 70 percent of people with disabilities who are unemployed or underemployed to achieve a productive, meaningful work life. The Work Incentive Grant program is designed to meet the needs of the 21st Century workforce by addressing skill shortages and special employment support services. These grants are also directed to effective and results-oriented job training through expanded access to One-Stop programs, as well as mandated and non-mandated resources that impact successful employment. The Office of Disability Employment Policy will develop, evaluate and replicate best practice models through demonstration projects designed to generate effective employment practices, thereby ultimately enhancing the workforce development system by assisting adults and youth with significant disabilities to move successfully into meaningful, long-term career opportunities. Dissemination of best practices developed throughout the job training and vocational rehabilitation community will further promote an integrated approach to adopt the most effective practices and expand the employment opportunities for people with disabilities.

The Women's Bureau supports the outcome goal of increasing employment, earnings and assistance by advocating the employment, training and retention of women to address identified worker shortages, especially in the areas of nursing and the placement of military spouses, older workers and workers with disabilities. Through the Women in Apprenticeship and Non Traditional Occupations (WANTO) grants program, the DOL Women’s Bureau will continue to promote and support women, their employers and labor unions that are seeking to increase the participation of women in apprenticeship and other better paying nontraditional occupations.

The FY 2003 outcome and performance goals for this strategic goal follow.  Detailed information on every performance goal, including indicator, data source, baseline and explanatory comments, can be found in Appendix A.


Outcome Goal 1.1—Increase Employment, Earnings, and Assistance

FY 2003 Performance Goals

Total Funds for This Outcome Goal (in Billions)

     

Fiscal Years

Budget Authority

Outlays

     

FY 2003

$ 2.2

$ 2.7

FY 2002

$ 2.7

$ 3.4

FY 2001

$ 2.7

$ 3.4

FY 2000

$ 2.3

$ 2.7

FY 1999

$ 5.0

$ 3.8

A.

Increase the employment, retention, and earnings of individuals registered under the WIA adult program.  In Program Year 2003:

  • 71 percent will be employed in the first quarter after program exit;
  • 82 percent of those employed in the first quarter after program exit will be employed in the third quarter after program exit; and
  • The average earnings change will be $3,475 for those who are employed in the first quarter after program exit and are still employed in the third quarter after program exit.

B.

Improve the outcomes for job seekers and employers who receive public labor exchange services.  In Program Year 2003: 

  • 58 percent* of job seekers registered with the public labor exchange will enter employment with a new employer by the end of the second quarter following registration;
  • 72 percent* of job seekers will continue to be employed two quarters after initial entry into employment with a new employer;
  • The number of job openings listed with the public labor exchange (with both State Workforce Agencies and America’s Job Bank) will increase by 5 percent over the total for PY 2001, as adjusted for economic fluctuation;
  • The number of job searches conducted by job seekers from America’s Job Bank will increase by 5 percent to a total of 195.4 million; and
  • The number of resume searches conducted by employers from America’s job Bank will increase by 5 percent to a total of 9.45 million.

C.

Strengthen the registered apprenticeship system to meet the training needs of business and workers in the 21st Century.  In Fiscal Year 2003:

  • Increase the number of new apprenticeship programs over the established baseline by 23 percent;
  • Increase the number of new businesses involved in apprenticeship over the established baseline by 23 percent;
  • Increase the number of new apprentices over the established baseline by 27 percent; and
  • Increase the number of new programs in new and emerging industries – at minimum Information Technology, Health Care and Social Services – over the established baseline by 20 percent.

D.

Implement new demonstration programs, through grants, designed to develop and test strategies to address the special needs of persons with significant disabilities.  In FY 2003:

  • Implement 30 new Olmstead grant projects, targeted at persons with significant disabilities who are institutionalized.
  • Implement 12 youth grant projects (6 of which are new technology skills projects) to assist youth through the One-Stop Centers and the WIA youth programs.

E.

Increase participation by community and faith-based organizations in the grant application process for WIA Adult programs.

  • Increase the number of applications from community and faith based organizations as a percentage of total applications received for Adult programs.  Target to be determined in fall 2002.

F.

Increase the employment and retention rate of veteran job seekers registering for public labor exchange services.

  • 58 percent* of veteran job seekers will be employed in the first or second quarter following registration.
  • 72 percent* of veteran job seekers will continue to be employed two quarters after initial entry into employment with a new employer.

G.

At least 54.5 percent of veterans enrolled in Homeless Veteran Reintegration Project grants enter Employment.

*  DOL is undergoing a transition to a new labor exchange performance measurement system. These performance goals are estimates and will be revised when baseline data become available.


Means and Strategies

Operating Agencies:  ETA, ODEP, VETS

Sustained Efforts in FY 2003:

Context for Goal 1.1A: In PY 2003, the WIA Adult program will be starting its fourth year of operation. The strategic goals and means of the previous years provide a context for 2003. In PY 2003, DOL will monitor the states' performance and operations, determine which states are not achieving their performance goals, and provide customized technical assistance. DOL will also prepare recommendations and reports regarding the re-authorization of WIA.

  • The PY 2002 WIA adult program objectives are: 1) ensuring timely, accurate, consistent and meaningful financial and performance data at the program level to facilitate informed management of adult program operations at all levels; 2) improving system response to customer needs; 3) improving the system of accountability for performance; and 4) strengthening the One-Stop Centers system and partnerships formed to improve services for jobseekers and employers.  It is expected that the tasks required to implement these strategies will continue during PY 2003, and these areas are described below (see Significant New or Enhanced Strategies section) to the extent they are known.  To support the last strategy, DOL will continue to enhance access to all adults to services available through One-Stop Career Centers by: 1) supporting outreach to low-income groups in schools and neighborhoods through community- and faith-based organizations, enlisting their assistance in assessment and referral of individuals to local One-Stop Career Centers; and 2) expanding access to services through enhanced use of Internet, telephone and other technologies to provide a broad spectrum of access points not dependent on a single method or medium.  (1.1A)
  • DOL will continue efforts begun in PY 2002 to identify reasons why adult jobseekers do not achieve a successful labor market transition as defined by WIA’s core measures (jobs, retention, earnings, credential) and take steps to address the findings.  (1.1A)
  • DOL will continue to engage private-sector employers both as customers and partners in the workforce development system by communications through employer organizations and business liaisons within the State Workforce Investment Boards.  The Department will strive to improve adult program services for the business customer by:
    • Seeking to ensure that training for adults available in local areas is directly linked to employer-identified skill shortages, in part by improving employer participation in the development and use of Eligible Training Provider Lists in local areas and States;
    • Through community audits, sectoral analyses, and other means, promoting training of adult workers in occupational areas identified by the business community as most in demand;
    • Improving services provided to employed adults by identifying and eliminating barriers to such assistance, and providing technical assistance to States and local areas on how such services can be integrated into the One-Stop service delivery system. (1.1A)
  • DOL will also work across One-Stop partner programs to identify and eliminate disincentives for co-enrolling individuals in multiple programs, in order to improve program integration and outcomes for jobseekers.  (1.1A)
  • DOL will provide a broad range of technical assistance and training to facilitate effective delivery of Wagner-Peyser employment and workforce information services within One-Stop systems including brokering of best practices, development of models and tools for State and local use, increased use of on-line information and training for the system, release of program guidance in key areas, and on-site technical assistance where feasible and needed.  Areas of focus will continue to be program/system performance and effective service delivery strategies that meet customer needs. (1.1B)
  • DOL will increase usage of the America’s Career Kit Tools by both employers and job seekers by: 1) continually improving the products’ value to customers based on customer input and feedback; 2) working with states to develop strategies to more effectively integrate the tools with service delivery in physical One-Stop systems; and 3) ongoing marketing of America’s Job Bank to employers and job seekers. (1.1B)
  • With employer input and feedback, DOL will continue to work with the states to identify and develop strategies to better serve employers through One-Stop systems in order to increase the number of jobs listed with One-Stops and job seekers that enter employment. (1.1B)
  • DOL will continue to support and improve the comprehensive Labor Exchange Performance Measurement System to provide performance information in support of optimizing the delivery of labor exchange services to employers and job seekers.  Program Year 2003 will be a critical milestone year for the performance measures in that baseline data from the new 9002 reporting system and the results of the new outcome measures will be fully available to help guide the system in continuous improvement. DOL will expect states to include expected levels of performance for the Labor Exchange Performance Measures, reached in agreement with ETA Regional Offices, in their five-year strategic plans.  (1.1B)
  • DOL will work with states to use re-employment services funds to provide intensive services to UI claimants in need of reemployment assistance so they can return more quickly to work.  States will provide early intervention, immediate referrals to suitable job openings, and staff-assisted, intensive services as needed.  Additional funds will enable services to more Unemployment Insurance claimants and will enable increased positive employment outcomes. (1.1B)
  • With the strategic direction of the Workforce Information Council, DOL and states will make investments in State and local workforce information (labor market information) tools and service delivery strategies.  This information is integral to helping employers more accurately articulate their skill needs and job seekers make career decisions and articulate the skills they have to offer employers.  As part of this effort, DOL will continue to promote and support O*NET as the common occupation language for the workforce investment system which supports integrated service delivery and provides critical information on the skills and abilities associated with different occupations, which is an underlying component of almost every workforce development activity. (1.1B)
  • DOL will continue to engage the Workforce Development system to expand apprenticeship.  (1.1C)
  • DOL will continue to review existing research from the registered apprenticeship system, engage current stakeholders and gather input from new potential customers to participate in the registered apprenticeship system.  (1.1C)
  • DOL will continue to identify and develop partnerships involving apprenticeship training in a minimum of 3 targeted industries. (1.1C)
  • DOL will continue to develop four campaigns to convene four forums with business and industry organizations to expand registered apprenticeship. (1.1C)
  • DOL will ensure that ETA continues to collaborate with the Office of Faith-Based and Community Initiatives to promote and expand the registered apprenticeship system. (1.1C)
  • DOL will continue to seek input from faith-based and community-based organizations on effective means to address their issues.  (1.1C)
  • DOL will continue to identify promising practices with State Workforce Investment Boards and registered apprenticeship to develop examples of how apprenticeship can participate with all States. (1.1C)
  • DOL will continue to develop customized training programs with One-Stop Centers for apprenticeship referrals for businesses and job seekers.  (1.1C)
  • DOL will improve the integration and effectiveness of services provided to veterans within the workforce development system through an emphasis on program evaluation, pilot testing, and system improvements that address priority service to veterans  (1.1F)
  • DOL will continue to coordinate and encourage the efforts of VETS’ State Directors  as they interact with State Workforce Investment Boards.  This coordination by VETS’ State Directors, delineating the nature and scope of  the Disabled Veterans’ Outreach Program (DVOP) and Local Veterans’ Employment Representative (LVER) activities and the role of the Public Labor Exchange, will help insure the provision of priority and maximum services to veterans in the One-Stop Centers.  (1.1F)
  • DOL will continue to promote the use of Veterans’ employment representatives in matching qualified separating military personnel with employer needs for specific industries within a single geographic area (a program known as “PROVET”—promoting reemployment opportunities for veterans).   (1.1F-G)

Significant New or Enhanced Efforts in FY 2003:

  • PY 2003 will be the final year of WIA prior to consideration of its reauthorization.  Objectives for the adult program in PY 2003 will include improving data quality, improving services to working adults, and strengthening the One-Stop Center system.  Program reviews will focus on financial and performance accountability and be undertaken in part to identify promising practices.  DOL will encourage States and local areas to explore means for improving outcomes for a range of customer groups – including employed workers, former welfare recipients, and individuals with Limited English Proficiency.  (1.1A)
  • Based upon the input from GAO, the WIA Readiness Teams, partners, and contractor studies, DOL will complete plans to improve how the adult program and the One-Stop system respond to customers’ needs and to improve the quality and timeliness of data in performance management systems.  This will assure that the program can be managed in a more effective, efficient manner, that more adults will receive appropriate employment and training services, and that the GPRA employment goals will be met or exceeded.
  1. Strategies to improve the Adult program components of participant assessment, case management, eligibility determination, informed customer choice, and customized and responsive services involve using several means to assess current practices, identify promising examples, and develop methods for bridging gaps between current and exemplary practice. Through collaborative assessments, DOL and State and local partners will determine appropriate means of improving the aforementioned components, identify key risk areas, and work intensively with those areas with specific needs.  Demonstration projects will be supported to implement more effective practices in some States and areas.  By the end of PY 2003, a large majority of States and local areas will be providing sophisticated customized employment and training services at One-Stop Centers, through internet web centers, and with business, community-based, and faith-based partners’ support.

  2. The strategy to improve the performance accountability system will parallel the process to improve the program components.  DOL staff in national and regional offices will monitor the reports’ timeliness and validity to determine which States meet the standard level of confidence; for those States which do not meet the standard, DOL will develop and provide customized technical assistance to assure they meet the standards.  These efforts will provide a more reliable, valid, and accurate reporting system and assure more credible reporting to Congress and the public.  During PY 2002, a joint workgroup is to review the performance accountability system for adults.  The group’s reports will serve as the basis for DOL consideration of improvements to the reporting and accountability systems.  Improvements in the timeliness of data are expected to be implemented late in 2002, for applications in 2003. This menu will include measures on impact of customers served, broader customer satisfaction, comparisons benchmarked with related One-Stop Centers and competition.  Potential improvements will be considered for inclusion in the recommendations for WIA reauthorization to the Congress.  If approved and implemented, these changes will enable the Assistant Secretary for Employment and Training to better measure and justify the program’s impact, value, and benefits to Congress and the public.  (1.1A)
  • DOL will increase the registered apprenticeship system’s participation in the Department’s various education and training strategies and initiatives.  DOL will leverage its major employment and training initiatives to include apprenticeship as a mechanism to develop a skilled workforce and develop a process to engage more businesses to participate in the workforce development system.  As part of this increased participation, the registered apprenticeship system will be involved in customer surveys and other instruments developed to improve the workforce development system.  (1.1C)
  • DOL will implement, through the Office of Disability Employment Policy, grant projects to initialize and develop best practice models, to support and further enhance the capacity of the workforce development system to provide specialized services to people with significant disabilities.  In addition to training and employment services, these projects will provide increased access to assistive technology and expertise in obtaining such technology through federal loan programs to persons with significant disabilities who are moving from institutions to the community.  Another area of emphasis will be a new grants program that extends the High School/High Tech concept for youth with significant disabilities, to not only provide orientation to high tech occupations but also high tech skills training integrated with their high school learning opportunities.   Increased access to the workforce development system and rewarding employment opportunities for people with significant disabilities within their communities will be developed through these grant programs and replication of the best practices that result. (1.1D)
  • DOL will survey WIA Workforce Investment Areas to determine the mix of service provider applicants including the percentage that are faith- and community-based organizations to establish a baseline for performance. (1.1E)
  • DOL will develop informational strategies to promote the application by faith- and community-based organizations for WIA Adult funds(1.1E)
  • DOL will implement a performance measurement system for assessing services to veterans by the public labor exchange.  This system will provide performance information in support of optimizing the delivery of labor exchange services to veteran job seekers and will include performance measures, procedures for establishing expected levels of performance, and revised data collection and reporting procedures, relying on UI wage records as a data source.   DOL will also assess instituting a program of incentives and sanctions program for labor exchange grantees. (1.1F)
  • DOL will study the impact of staff assisted services on improving the entered employment and retention rates of veterans subgroups that are experiencing significantly higher levels of unemployment, such as women veterans (1.1F-G)

Cross-Cutting Programs and Issues

In regard to WIA implementation, DOL continues to work in close cooperation with its State and local partners in monitoring and overseeing the workforce development system and with its Federal partners in promoting unified planning at the State and local levels.  The Department continues to improve comprehensive planning for services to adults and implementation of such programs by:  1) supporting community audit projects that develop, collect and analyze information on economic and labor market trends in specific geographic areas, industries, or sectors, with a view toward improving real-time workforce investment information and services; and 2) assisting communities in developing comprehensive economic adjustment strategies to deal with dislocations with community-wide impact by continuing to work with other federal agencies to support such strategies.

DOL will continue to engage the Departments of Education (ED), Housing and Urban Development (HUD), Transportation (DOT) and Justice (DOJ) to leverage support for apprenticeship and thereby maximize resources to provide businesses and workers with skill development appropriate for the 21st Century.

DOL will continue to participate in the OMB-convened inter-agency group including HHS, HUD, and ED, as well as their State and local partners, to develop and refine common performance measures.  DOL also will address cross-cutting policy and related issues pertaining to systemic performance accountability.



Outcome Goal 1.2—Increase the Number of Youth Making A Successful Transition to Work

FY 2003 Performance Goals

Total Funds for This Outcome Goal (in Billions)

Fiscal Years

Budget Authority

Outlays

     

FY 2003

$ 2.6

$ 2.9

FY 2002

$ 2.9

$ 3.0

FY 2001

$ 2.9

$ 2.4

FY 2000

$ 2.7

$ 2.2

FY 1999

$ 1.6

$ 1.2

A.


Increase entrance and retention of youth registered under the WIA youth program in education or employment.  In Program Year 2003:

  • 52 percent of the 14–18 year-old youth who enter the program without a diploma or equivalent will attain a secondary school diploma or equivalent by the first quarter after exit;
  • 65 percent of the 19–21 year-old youth will be employed in the first quarter after program exit; and,
  • 78 percent of the 19–21 year-old youth employed in the first quarter after exit will be employed in the third quarter after program exit.

B.

Increase participation, retention, and earnings of Job Corps graduates in employment and education.  In Program Year 2003:

  • The number of students who attain high school diplomas while enrolled in Job Corps will increase by 20 percent from PY 2002;
  • 70 percent will continue to be employed or enrolled in education six months after their initial placement date; and
  • Graduates with jobs at six months after their initial placement date will earn average hourly wages of $8.27.

C.

Increase retention of Youth Opportunity Grant participants in education or employment.  In Program Year 2003:

  • 52 percent of the 14–18 year-old youth who enter the program without a diploma or equivalent will attain a secondary school diploma or equivalent by the first quarter after exit;
  • 65 percent of the 19–21 year-old youth will be employed in the first quarter after program exit; and
  • 78 percent of the 19–21 year-old youth employed in the first quarter after exit will be employed in the third quarter after program exit.

D.

Increase participation by community and faith-based organizations in the grant application process for WIA Youth programs.

  • Increase the number of applications from community and faith based organizations as a percentage of total applications received for Adult programs.  Target to be determined in fall 2002.

Means and Strategies

Operating Agencies: ETA

Sustained Efforts in FY 2003:

  • In order to increase the attainment of a high school diploma or its equivalent, placement in advanced training, and employment opportunities with career paths, DOL will continue to provide guidance for programs serving youth to focus on the provision of strong academic and skills training and enhanced placement and transitional services for program graduates.  Such placement and transitional services will include child care, transportation, and housing support, as well as counseling from career transition services providers and other workforce development partners.  (1.2A, B and C)
  • DOL federal and State staff will jointly determine the effectiveness of local youth programs.  These staff will complete 50 site visits by June 30, 2004, to local areas, providing technical assistance, guidance and identifying best practices.  Success will be achieved once the 50 site visits are completed and local area directors and youth council chairs receive a report of findings and recommendations.  (1.2A)
  • DOL will issue its annual program guidance to States and local areas implementing comprehensive youth services under WIA.  The 2003 program emphasis will focus on strong academic and skills training components, leading to a high school diploma or its equivalent; advanced training and employment opportunities that lead to career paths; and follow-up services that lead to retention in employment.  The guidance letter will be issued by April of 2003.  (1.2A)
  • DOL’s regions will conduct at least one youth conference or other technical assistance event that focuses on providing local communities and youth councils with strategies to build strong youth investment systems that promote attainment of diplomas/General Education Diplomas or advanced training leading to career opportunities.  Seventy-five percent of conferees will rate the quality of the information exchange at the conference as good to excellent.  (1.2A and C)
  • DOL will continue the national best practices strategy to promote educational and skills training achievement for younger youth.  The National Office, assisted by the regions, will maintain a web-base database of best practices and strategies.  Success will be achieved when 90 percent of the users rate this service as effective.  (1.2A and C)
  • DOL will convene a second National Youth Summit of a representative group of WIA participants.  Attendees will act as focus groups to develop “what works” practices from a youth perspective.  Success will be measured when 100 percent of states are provided with the results of the focus groups to incorporate into their customer satisfaction programs.  (1.2A and C)
  • DOL will continue to place emphasis on performance in Job Corps’ competitive procurement process, including the initiation of performance-based contracts and coordination throughout the agency to maintain compatibility and compliance with DOL and the Employment and Training Administration standards.  (1.2B)
  • DOL will continue to establish and refine clear, measurable benchmarks of program success through input from State and local officials and by monitoring participant outcomes in such areas as academic achievement, placement and retention in employment and further education after program completion.  (1.2A, B and C)
  • DOL will continue to provide technical assistance to Job Corps staff nationwide by updating training modules, monitoring regional staff training plans, and analyzing results of satisfaction surveys to further address customer needs.  (1.2B)
  • Several agencies in the Department of Labor will continue to develop a model safety and health program to maintain safe and healthy environments at all Job Corps centers, critical to the long-term labor market success of program graduates. (1.2B)
  • To foster accountability and to ensure effective, results-oriented education and job training, DOL will continue to incorporate findings from the long-term evaluation study of Job Corps, as well as any new recommendations from other external bodies, such as the Office of Inspector General and General Accounting Office. (1.2B)
  • DOL will ensure the Youth Opportunity Grant program effectiveness through monitoring and providing oversight via quarterly reports.  (1.2C)

Significant New or Enhanced Efforts in FY 2003:

  •  While in this last year of authorization under the Workforce Investment Act, DOL will place continued emphasis on improving the quality of services in order to equip our youth with the knowledge, skills, and abilities required to effectively meet the changing needs of business and the new economy as well as a focus on the reauthorization of The Workforce Investment Act.  Because Program Year 2003 is the last year of authorization, DOL plans to analyze the experiences of State and local areas in the effective delivery of high quality, comprehensive youth services and assess how well these services met the challenge of preparing our most at-risk youth for post-secondary education and careers.  Our goal is to determine the potential areas for improvement and issues that could be addressed through the reauthorization of the Workforce Investment Act.  (1.2A and C)
  •  DOL will enhance Job Corps career offerings that meet local labor market demands through modernization of training programs, using labor market information and input from Industry Councils and employers.  (1.2B)
  • During the last year of direct federal funding, a continued focus will be on developing and implementing viable sustainability strategies.  DOL will provide technical assistance to Youth Opportunity Grantees in the areas of resource mapping, developing ties to State, local, and private funding, and strengthening linkages to local youth formula-funded programs.  DOL will work with local Youth Councils in this effort.  (1.2C)
  •  DOL will increase the number of high school diplomas attained as a means to enhance educational credentials and career opportunities for youth. (1.2A, B, and C)
  • DOL will survey WIA Workforce Investment Areas to determine the mix of service provider applicants including the percentage that are faith- and community-based organizations to establish a baseline for performance. (1.2D)
  • DOL will develop informational strategies to promote the application by faith and community-based organizations for WIA Youth funds. (1.2D)

Cross-Cutting Programs and Issues

DOL will facilitate the involvement of faith-based organizations, as partners, to expand educational, cultural, recreational and career opportunities for youth. 

DOL will work with the Department of Education and the Department of Defense’s Education Activity to assist with the development of local partnerships to expand high school diploma attainment opportunities for Job Corps program participants.



Outcome Goal 1.3—Improve the Effectiveness of Information and Analysis on the U.S. Economy

FY 2003 Performance Goals

Total Funds for This Outcome Goal (in Millions)

   

Fiscal Years

Budget Authority

Outlays

FY 2003

$ 530

$ 585

FY 2002

$ 507

$ 426

FY 2001

$ 483

$ 457

FY 2000

$ 420

$ 413

FY 1999

$ 403

$ 383

A.

Produce and disseminate timely, reliable, and relevant economic information.

B.

Improve the accuracy, efficiency, and relevancy of economic measures.

Means and Strategies

Operating Agency:  BLS

Sustained Efforts in FY 2003:

  • DOL will continue to carry out its mandate as the principal fact-finding agency for the Federal government in the field of labor economics.  This includes producing impartial and objective essential economic data for the Nation in the areas of employment and unemployment, price change, compensation, safety and health, productivity, and economic growth.  Business, labor, governments, the media, and the public rely on these measures to develop economic policy and make well-informed decisions.  (1.3A–B)
  • By utilizing technological advances, DOL will improve the operational processes used to develop economic data, specifically through the use of the BLS Statistical Program Model.  (1.3A–B)
  • The Department’s BLS is a knowledge-based organization composed of information workers: individuals who must have the knowledge, skills, and abilities to gather, analyze, and disseminate statistical information relevant to policy makers and American citizens.  The rapid development of information technology and new approaches and methods for data collection and analysis has changed and continues to change the nature of the work at BLS.  As a result, BLS needs to insure that it remains competitive with other organizations in terms of the salaries, benefits, training, challenging work, and other incentives it offers to its highly skilled workers.  BLS will continue to focus its efforts in several key human capital activities, specifically in recruitment and retention. (1.3A–B)

Significant New or Enhanced Efforts in FY 2003:      

  • DOL will publish Current Employment Statistics, Job Openings and Labor Turnover Survey, and Current Population Survey data series using the North American Industry Classification System (NAICS).  NAICS replaces the Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) system and offers a new and more consistent approach to industrial classification that better reflects the modern economy.  (1.3B)
  • DOL will put in place a new, more rapid process for updating the items in a significant proportion of Consumer Price Index categories.  Item samples for these categories will be reselected within existing stores and establishments midway between each four-year outlet sample rotation. This effort will further improve the timeliness and accuracy of the index.  (1.3B) 
  • DOL will complete implementation of a new process to electronically collect prices for Consumer Price Index items other than rent.  The process offers numerous benefits, including the reduction in time required to transmit and process data; increased accuracy and efficiency in data entry and review due to field staff directly entering data instead of completing handwritten survey forms for later input by clerical staff; and data editing during data collection.  (1.3B)
  • DOL will produce measures of labor productivity and unit labor costs for two additional service-producing industries and a measure of multifactor productivity for one additional industry. Users of the productivity statistics have stated the critical need for more coverage in the service sector and specifically more measures of multifactor productivity. Multifactor productivity measures take into account labor, capital, and intermediate inputs. New multifactor productivity measures for service-producing industries will provide information on the substitution of capital for labor and the substitution of intermediate inputs, such as materials and energy, for labor.  They also will supply insight on technological progress in the service sector.  (1.3B) 
  • DOL will modernize the computing systems for monthly processing of the Producer Price Index (PPI) and the U.S. Import and Export Price Indexes, both OMB-designated Principal Federal Economic Indicators.  These efforts will allow for improvements to both programs, such as annual weight updates to the U.S. Import and Export Price Indexes.  Historically, these indexes have been reweighted every five years and the change will produce a significant improvement in index reliability. (1.3B) 
  • The Department’s BLS Internet Data Collection Facility (IDCF) will be fully operational for at least two of its Principal Federal Economic Indicators.  IDCF can provide a single, manageable, and secure architecture for Bureau surveys to use in collecting information over the Internet. This data collection method is intended to reduce the cost of conducting surveys as well as increase the accuracy and efficiency of collection.  (1.3B)

Cross-Cutting Programs and Issues

DOL, as a producer of economic statistics on the U.S. economy, must work in partnership with other Federal, State, and international statistical agencies.  These organizations encounter common and sometimes overlapping issues that must be addressed in a coordinated manner for the benefit of the users of these data.  Such coordination not only maximizes DOL performance, but also helps to improve the accuracy, efficiency, and relevancy of economic measures produced by the Department.

As a Federal statistical agency, the Department’s BLS is a member of the Interagency Council on Statistical Policy, a committee of representatives from 15 agencies, which works to identify areas for collaboration.  During FY 2003, the Council will enhance FedStats, a portal or "one-stop shopping" website for Federal statistics, and continue research and development efforts with its academic Digital Government partners in moving towards a National Statistical Knowledge Network.

As a member of the international statistical community, DOL also works with foreign statistical agencies and international organizations in efforts to enhance comparability of concepts and definitions.  During FY 2003, DOL will participate in statistical working parties sponsored by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development to address issues dealing with improving and standardizing the data on productivity and employment/unemployment used around the world.

4.2       DOL Strategic Goal 2—A Secure Workforce

DOL STRATEGIC GOAL 2

A SECURE WORKFORCE
Promote the economic security of workers and families

OUTCOME GOALS:

  • Increase compliance with worker protection laws
  • Protect worker benefits
  • Increase employment and earnings for retrained workers

Total Funds for This Goal (in Billions):

Fiscal Years Budget Authority Outlays
FY 2003 $ 50.2 $ 49.2
FY 2002 $ 52.2 $ 50.7
FY 2001 $ 37.0 $ 32.3
FY 2000 $ 26.5 $ 24.9
FY 1999 $ 27.7 $ 26.5

DOL is committed to protecting workers’ hours, wages, and other working conditions; providing unemployment compensation and other benefits when workers are unable to work; and expanding, enhancing, and protecting workers’ retirement plans, health care plans, and other benefits.

Department of Labor programs and agencies with the primary operational responsibility for achieving this strategic goal include the Pension and Welfare Benefits Administration (PWBA); the Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation (PBGC); the Employment and Training Administration’s Unemployment Compensation programs, Trade Adjustment Assistance and North American Free Trade Agreement-Transitional Adjustment Assistance (TAA/NAFTA-TAA) programs, Workforce Investment Act (WIA) Dislocated Worker Assistance; and the Employment Standards Administration (ESA)'s Wage and Hour Division, Office of Labor-Management Standards and Office of Workers’ Compensation Programs.  In addition, the Office of Small Business Programs (OSBP), the Office of the Solicitor, the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Administration and Management, the Office of Inspector General, and the Appellate Boards provide indirect support to this strategic goal.

The performance goals in this section support the Department's commitment to the protection of the American workforce in the 21st Century.  The goal of promoting compliance in typically low-wage industries, for example, reflects the Department's commitment to guaranteeing an honest day's pay for an honest day's work, which is especially critical for the most economically disadvantaged American workers.  The Department has also established a goal to protect the economic safety and security of American workers and their workplaces by promoting the responsible stewardship of union funds. 

A key objective of the Department’s role in the administration and oversight of benefit programs for unemployed workers and for those who have suffered work-related injuries and illnesses is the responsible stewardship of taxpayer dollars.  Additionally, DOL’s goals to improve payment timeliness and assistance to unemployed and injured workers to return to the workplace represent the practical implementation of the Department's pledge to give hope to all individuals that they will not be left behind in the quest for the American dream.

The retraining assistance offered to workers who lost their jobs in mass layoffs or plant closings or who have been laid off and are unlikely to return to their jobs illustrates the Secretary’s emphasis on effective, results-oriented job training.   The FY 2003 performance goals for these dislocated workers set ambitious benchmarks for the economic results, including employment, earnings and job retention, to be achieved through job training and other employment assistance services.

DOL policies that guide the implementation of dislocated worker programs underscore the importance of directing training efforts to meet the skill needs of the 21st Century, especially with respect to countering skill shortages in information technology and other high-tech fields.  This focus on training to meet emerging skill demands supports the Secretary’s emphasis on re-orienting the Department’s programs to meet the needs of the 21st Century workforce.

The FY 2003 outcome and performance goals for this strategic goal follow.  Detailed information on every performance goal, including indicator, data source, baseline and explanatory comments, can be found in Appendix A.


Outcome Goal 2.1—Increase Compliance with Worker Protection Laws

FY 2003 Performance Goals

Total Funds for This Outcome Goal (in Millions)

   
 

Fiscal Years

Budget Authority

Outlays

FY 2003

$ 333

$ 345

FY 2002

$ 336

$ 334

FY 2001

$ 321

$ 311

FY 2000

$ 265

$ 262

FY 1999

$ 216

$ 233

A.

Covered American workplaces legally, fairly, and safely employ and compensate their workers as indicated by:

  1. Improving customer service by increasing the number of complaints resolved within 90 days.  Target TBD; baseline being established in FY 2002.
  2. Reducing employer recidivism.  In FY 2003:
    • Increase the number of reinvestigations without violations - target TBD; baseline being established in FY 2002.
    • Decrease the number of reinvestigations with identical violations - target TBD; baseline being established in FY 2002.
  3. Increasing compliance in industries with chronic violations.
    1. as indicated in the garment manufacturing industry by:
      • Increase by 3 percentage points the percent of garment homeworker cases in southern California conducted jointly with the State of California.
      • Increase by 2 percentage points the percentage of contractors in southern California that pay all employees on the payroll.
      • Increase by 2 percentage points the number of manufacturers that monitor their contractor shops for compliance in southern California.
      • Increase by 2 percentage points the percentage of contractors that are subject to unannounced visits and payroll reviews in conjunction with monitoring by manufacturers in southern California.
      • Increase by 4 percentage points the level of compliance of new contractors in New York City through compliance education.
      • Increase by 5 percentage points the rate of compliance of those New York City contractors engaged by manufacturers which were previously in violation of the FLSA “hot goods” provision.
      • Increase by 20 percent the number of New York City cases referred to SOL, the U.S. Attorney, or the New York State Attorney General’s Office for litigation.
    2. as indicated in the long-term health care industry by:
      • Increase by 3 percent the rate of compliance of nursing homes with identified staffing shortages (i.e. staffing less than the nationwide or State average or homes cited for staffing shortages).
      • Increase by 5 percent the number of employees in nursing homes provided information about their rights and available remedies.
      • Increase by 2 percent the number of reinvestigated nursing homes without violations.
      • Increase by 2 percent the percent of employees in the residential living (group home) segment of health care industry paid in compliance with the overtime requirements of the Fair Labor Standards Act.
    3. as indicated in agricultural commodities by:
      • Targets TBD, baselines being established in FY 2002.

B.

Advance safeguards for union financial integrity and democracy and the transparency of union operations by:

  1. Improving timely filing of union annual financial reports that contain information sufficient for public disclosure.  In FY 2003, the timely filing of union annual financial reports by unions with annual receipts over $200,000 will increase - target TBD; baseline being established in FY 2002.
  2. Extending Labor-Management Reporting and Disclosure Act protections for union financial integrity to a greater number of labor organizations through a more effective use of investigative resources.  In FY 2003 the percentage of investigative resources applied to criminal investigation that result in convictions is increased - target TBD; baseline being established in FY 2002.

C.

Increase by 5 percent (to 2,093) per year the number of closed civilinvestigations of employee pension plans where assets are restored, prohibited transactions are corrected, participant benefits are recovered, or plan assets are protected from mismanagement and risk of future loss is reduced.

D.

Increase by 5 percent (to 651) per year the number of closed civil investigations of employee health and welfare plans where assets are restored, prohibited transactions are corrected, participant benefits are recovered, or plan assets are protected from mismanagement and risk of future loss is reduced.

Means and Strategies

Operating Agencies:  ESA, PWBA

Sustained Efforts in FY 2003:

  • DOL will establish complaint intake procedures to ensure the adequate screening of complaints. (2.1A1)
  • DOL offices will conduct regular reviews of complaint inventories using established accountability measures and management reports to ensure that timeliness measures are being met. (2.1A1)
  • DOL will establish streamlined procedures where necessary to ensure early:
    • contact with complainants;
    • development of case facts;
    • identification of appropriate investigative tool; and,
    • identification of potential litigation cases. (2.1A1)
  • DOL will:
    • provide compliance assistance on all applicable statutes administered by DOL during the conduct of an investigation; secure agreements for future compliance and specific commitments for future compliance following a DOL intervention; and, obtain commitments for corporate-wide compliance by multi-establishment employers through formal and informal agreements following a history of DOL interventions.
    • assess penalties, pursue litigation and prosecution, and publicize the consequences of non-compliant behavior as may be appropriate for willful and repeat violators.
    • provide ongoing training to its investigative staff and conduct reviews according to established accountability measures to ensure that proper policies and procedures are followed during initial DOL interventions. (2.1A2)
  • DOL will establish liaisons on the State and Federal level to coordinate and facilitate joint homework investigations; will conduct joint training with the State of California to facilitate communication and jointly working on homework cases; and will conduct a garment enforcement sweep with the State of California with emphasis on homeworkers.  (2.1A3)
  • DOL will work to identify potential sources of non-compliance in the garment industry by:
    • meeting with organizations and businesses to discuss practices of paying workers “off the payroll” and the impact on minimum wage and overtime compliance;
    • asking employers at all final conferences whether they have knowledge of competitors paying less than minimum wage;
    • asking all homeworkers who they have worked for before as a homeworker; and,
    • reading classified ads and listening to radio ads seeking homeworkers.
      DOL will follow-up on the above information by conducting a directed program based on leads from these sources.  (2.1A3)
  • DOL will conduct face-to-face contacts with contractors and manufacturers in southern California, providing them with compliance assistance.  (2.1A3)
  • DOL will work with manufacturers who monitor their contractors to identify and correct off the payroll situations, and will meet with known monitoring companies in southern California to discuss and train staff in ways to detect and correct situations where workers are off the payroll.  (2.1A3)
  • DOL will work with members of the Korean Manufacturers Associations to implement monitoring; will conduct monitoring training sessions for manufacturers, including some in Korean and have those attending submit their first monitoring report to DOL for review and suggested corrective action; and will emphasize in contacts with manufacturers the value and importance of monitoring and effective monitoring.  (2.1A3)
  • DOL will conduct “diamond” approach investigations of manufacturers with repeat violations.  (2.1A3)
  • DOL will use the southern California survey information in monitoring classes, training sessions, face to face and telephone contacts with manufacturers, and meetings with monitoring companies, emphasizing effective monitoring and these components specifically as potential predictors of better compliance.  (2.1A3)
  • DOL will provide compliance assistance to new contractors, including partnering with the New York State Apparel Industry Task Force, and will conduct payroll audits of newly registered contractors.  (2.1A3)
  • DOL will encourage/ensure that contractors producing for manufacturers that are members of New York City’s Apparel Industry Compliance Partnership (AICP) will participate in the AICP’s training program. (2.1A3)
  • DOL will target manufacturers with a history of “hot goods” violations for investigation, and will provide training to manufacturers and their contractors when “hot goods” violations are found.  (2.1A3)
  • DOL will request manufacturers to institute a compliance monitoring program of their contractors.  (2.1A3)
  • DOL will target enforcement on repeat violators, and will consider litigation for repeat violators.  (2.1A3)
  • DOL will partner with DOL’s Office of the Inspector General, the Assistant U.S. Attorney’s Office,  and the New York State Attorney General to explore areas of common interest for potential criminal investigations.  (2.1A3)
  • DOL will work more closely with RSOL to identify potential litigation cases early in the investigative process.  (2.1A3)
  • DOL will develop a compliance assistance program geared to problems common in nursing homes with staffing shortages and implement the program in district offices where violations continue to be prevalent. (2.1A3)
  • Where compliance rates continue to be low and identified violations are those with a high correlation to staffing shortages, DOL will pilot an employer consultation program with the assistance of local and national health care associations.  (2.1A3)
  • Fact sheets on meal breaks, child labor requirements, hours worked, and bonuses will be developed and distributed through industry trade magazines, the Internet and association seminars.  DOL will work with industry representatives to ensure that the fact sheets are clear, concise and geared towards the health care industry.  (2.1A3)
  • DOL will complete the employee rights card for employees that provides basic information on employee rights.  The card will be distributed to employees through employee advocacy organizations, community groups, community colleges that offer courses and training to certified nurses assistants, and State licensing agencies.  The card will also be made available to employees during the course of investigations.  (2.1A3)
  • DOL will provide compliance assistance on all common compliance problems in nursing homes during the conduct of an investigation.  (2.1A3)
  • DOL will secure agreements for future compliance and specific commitments for future compliance following a DOL intervention.  (2.1A3)
  • DOL will obtain commitments for corporate-wide compliance by multi-establishment employers through formal and informal agreements following a history of DOL interventions.  (2.1A3)
  • DOL will maintain an enforcement presence among prior violators, and will assess penalties, pursue litigation and prosecution, and publicize the consequences of non-compliant behavior as may be appropriate for willful and repeat violators.  (2.1A3)
  • DOL will conduct full investigations of alleged overtime, minimum wage and child labor violations.  (This excludes last paycheck conciliations.)  (2.1A3)
  • DOL will re-emphasize its compliance assistance program to highlight problems common in residential care and in geographic areas where residential care violations appear more common.  (2.1A3)
  • DOL will work with State licensing agencies to pilot the dissemination of compliance materials to newly licensed residential care facilities.  (2.1A3)
  • DOL will work with local and national health care associations to develop and pilot a consultation program for small and new residential group homes.  (2.1A3)
  • DOL will continue the operational development of the Technology for Excellent Customer Service (TECS) systems that will provide nationwide toll-free access to:  1) promptly identify and refer calls unrelated to DOL activities to the appropriate agency; 2) answer commonly asked questions quickly and accurately; and, 3) eventually accept employee complaints alleging violations and refer them electronically to the proper field office. (2.1A1, 2, and 3)
  • DOL will investigate complaints concerning union officer elections, supervise remedial union officer elections, and conduct audits and civil and criminal investigations to enforce LMRDA standards for union democracy and financial integrity.  DOL will secure reports required from unions and others under the LMRDA and make them available for public disclosure, including public disclosure via the Internet using a searchable data base of information from union financial reports.  DOL will administer an electronic reporting process initiated in FY 2002.  DOL will continue to perform all statutory responsibilities to ensure union democracy and to strive for quality and efficiency in these mission-critical endeavors. (2.1B)
  • DOL will continue to offer and conduct compliance assistance seminars throughout the country to explain the requirements of the Labor-Management Reporting and Disclosure Act (LMRDA).  These seminars cover topics such as union reporting and recordkeeping, financial safeguards for union funds, elections of union officers, and training for union trustees on conducting audits in small unions.  These seminars may be sponsored by labor unions, labor education programs, or other groups to provide training for their representatives or may be DOL-sponsored and attended by any interested union officers and members.  DOL will continue to advertise upcoming compliance assistance seminars on its website, and to extend to interested organizations the opportunity to sponsor seminars in the future.  (2.1B)
  • DOL will foster partnerships with international unions to promote voluntary compliance with LMRDA standards by affiliates and will provide compliance assistance to union officials.  A program of compliance assistance contacts will be continued that targets unions scheduled to elect officers in FY 2003 whose previous election was investigated by the agency.  A program of contacts at the field office level to obtain timely reports by unions with receipts of more than $200,000 that were delinquent in the prior year will be continued.  A program of seminars for trustees of small unions will be continued to provide assistance and training in use of the agency-developed guide for trustees in conducting audits in small unions.  DOL will provide outreach to union members to promote the objectives of the LMRDA.  DOL will also continue distribution of a publication and program to advise new unions and new officers about their responsibilities under the LMRDA.  (2.1B)
  • DOL will promote the formal voluntary compliance program through which fiduciaries who have found problems with their plans can seek assistance and/or approval in taking corrective action.  This will particularly benefit small employers who otherwise might not take the corrective actions necessary to come into compliance.  (2.1C)
  • DOL will continue to support cross cutting activities pertaining to coordinated compliance assistance for small businesses and One-Stop Centers for education and outreach.  (2.1C–D)
  • DOL will continue to target and investigate pension, health care and other plan violations where participants are most susceptible to actual loss of benefits, or “populations” of plan participants who are potentially exposed to the greatest risk of falling victim to unlawful conduct.  The solicitor will continue to support PWBA’s enforcement efforts by pursuing  litigation to remove bad actors and to make financial recoveries on behalf of plan participants.  (2.1C–D)

Significant New or Enhanced Efforts in FY 2003:

  • DOL will focus case targeting and management to promote effective use of investigative resources.  DOL will allocate criminal investigative time to cases with the most prosecutive potential and, where appropriate, redirect criminal investigative resources to union compliance audits.  DOL will increase the number of compliance audits that are conducted to discover and correct violations of LMRDA fiduciary safeguards.  Beginning in FY 2003, at least 1 percent of labor organizations subject to the LMRDA will be audited each fiscal year. (2.1B)
  • DOL will further efforts to incorporate in the Internet-based public disclosure system, union trusteeship reports and reports filed by employers, consultants, union officers and employees, and surety companies under the LMRDA.  (2.1B)
  • DOL will explore means to enhance union transparency, increase information available to union members, and better inform union members of their rights. (2.1B)
  • DOL will expand its “orphan plan” project as a means for safeguarding employee benefits where fiduciaries have abdicated their responsibilities through neglect, death, bankruptcy, or incarceration (2.1C).
  • Publish and/or update compliance assistance materials for employers, plan sponsors, and practitioners to inform them about requirements related to, among other things, the new health laws (2.1D).
  • Continue educating employees and employers via the Department’s national health education campaign in conjunction with the many private and public partners about health benefit issues. (2.1D)
  • Via the Department’s Benefit Advisors, conduct grassroots outreach to plan sponsors by proactively seeking out local organizations and events to distribute printed compliance assistance material and provide technical assistance (2.1D)
  • DOL continues to expand upon its enforcement efforts of the new health care provisions in Employee Retirement and Income Security Act (ERISA) to ensure there is compliance with the new health care laws.  The Department continues to refine extensive compliance guides to assist investigators in review of health plans and a nationwide enforcement project to conduct investigations of health plans to ensure that workers and their families are not unjustly denied any protections provided under the new health care provisions.  (2.1D)

Cross-Cutting Programs and Issues

The Office of Small Business Programs (OSBP) serves a cross-cutting function by coordinating with ESA and other DOL enforcement agencies on customer/stakeholder feedback to resolve problems and improve agency operations.

In addition, PWBA and SOL coordinate enforcement, policy, regulatory, and public information programs with numerous Federal, State, and local entities in carrying out the Department’s ERISA and Federal Employee Retirement Security Act responsibilities.  Under ERISA, DOL/PWBA shares enforcement responsibilities with the Treasury Department, the IRS, and DOL’s Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation (PBGC).  Cooperation with these agencies promotes increased benefit coverage by minimizing regulatory and administrative burdens, to the extent appropriate, with respect to ERISA’s statutory and regulatory requirements.

Additionally, DOL/PWBA often coordinates enforcement actions with financial institution regulatory agencies, such as the Comptroller of the Currency, the Federal Reserve System, the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, the National Credit Union Administration, the Securities and Exchange Commission, State insurance and financial regulatory entities, DOL’s Office of Inspector General, as well as with the enforcement agencies such as the FBI, US Postal Service, and State and local law enforcement agencies.



Outcome Goal 2.2—Protect Worker Benefits

FY 2003 Performance Goals

Total Funds for This Outcome Goal (in Billions)

 

 

Fiscal Years

Budget Authority

Outlays

   

FY 2003

$ 48.3

$ 47.2

FY 2002

$ 50.3

$ 49.0

FY 2001

$ 34.9

$ 31.2

FY 2000

$ 24.6

$ 23.4

FY 1999

$ 25.9

$ 25.0

A.

Make timely and accurate benefit payments to unemployed workers, facilitate the reemployment of Unemployment Insurance claimants, and set up Unemployment tax accounts promptly for new employers.  In Fiscal Year 2003:

  • Payment Timeliness:  91 percent of all intrastate first payments will be made within 14/21 days;
  • Payment Accuracy:  Work to improve payment accuracy based on the target set in FY 2002;
  • Facilitate Reemployment:  A target will be set based on a baseline established during FY 2002 for the entered employment rate of Unemployment Insurance claimants; and
  • Establish Tax Accounts Promptly:  80 percent of new employers will receive a determination about their Unemployment Insurance tax liability within 90 days of the end of the first quarter they become liable for the tax.

B.

Promptly review employer applications for foreign labor certifications.  In Fiscal Year 2003:

  • Process 95 percent of employer labor condition applications for the H-1B professional/specialty temporary program within seven days of receipt; and
  • The average time required in the ETA’s Regional Offices to process applications received under the new PERM process for permanent alien residency will be reduced to six months.


C.


Increase by 2 percent (to $68 million) benefit recoveries achieved through the assistance of Pension Benefit Advisors.

D.

Minimize the human, social, and financial impact of work-related injuries for workers and their families.  In FY 2003:

  1. Decrease by 3 percent from the FY 2001 baseline the average number of production days lost due to disability in the FECA program for
    • United States Postal Service (USPS ) cases
    • All other Government cases
  2. Reduce by 5 percent over the FY 2001 established baseline the average time required to resolve disputed issues in Longshore and Harbor Worker’s Compensation Program contested cases.
  3. Increase by 4 percent over the FY 2001 established baseline the percentage of Black Lung benefit claims filed under the revised regulations for which, following an eligibility decision by the district director, there are no requests for further action from any party pending one year after receipt of the claim.
  4. For Initial Processing of claims for benefits in the Energy Program:
    • 80 percent of claims of Department of Energy (DOE) employees, or of contractors employed at DOE facilities, are processed within 120 days.
    • 80 percent of claims of employees of Atomic Weapons Employers (AME) and Beryllium Vendors are processed within 180 days.
  5. For processing of Requests for Hearings in the Energy Program:
    • 80 percent of Final Decisions in Approved Claims or No-Contest Denials are issued within 75 days from issuance of the Recommended Decision.
    • 80 percent of Final Decisions in Reviews of the Written Record are issued within 75 days of the Request for Review of Written Record.
    • 80 percent of Final Decisions in Formal Hearings are issued within 250 days of the Request for Hearing.
  6. Through use of Periodic Roll Management, produce $145 million in cumulative first-year savings (FY 1999 -2003) in the FECA program.
  7. Reduce the overall average medical service costs per case (adjusted for inflation) in the FECA program by .75 percent versus the FY 2000 baseline.

E.

PBGC will provide accurate and timely payments to the beneficiaries and businesses it serves, including (1) paying eligible beneficiaries an estimated lump sum payment within one year of trusteeing the pension plan; (2) minimizing the number of erroneous benefit payments; (3) beginning accurate benefit payments within 60 to 90 days of receipt of a completed application; and (4) refunding pension fund overpayments to businesses within ninety days of a request.

Means and Strategies

Operating Agencies:  ETA, ESA, PWBA, PBGC

Sustained Efforts in FY 2003:

  • To help raise overall first payment timeliness and new status determination timeliness, DOL will initially ensure that the State Quality Service Plans of States with performance below the established minimum criteria have the mandatory corrective action plans to raise performance.  DOL will also urge all other States that are below the 91 percent target to develop plans leading to quicker claims handling without compromising payment accuracy.  States just meeting the minimum performance criterion (60 percent) for determining new status liability will be encouraged to develop plans designed to increase timeliness, without compromising the accuracy of determinations. (2.2A)
  • DOL will continue to urge States to use data in the State Directory of New Hires to limit overpayments due to working while claiming benefits and detect earlier those which have occurred.  (2.2A)
  • DOL will provide the system with quarterly reports on State payment timeliness and State employer tax liability determination timeliness so that progress can be monitored and problems can be addressed immediately.  (2.2A)
  • DOL will monitor functioning of the labor certification application process, both the web-based and faxed-based, for the H-1B professional/specialty temporary program on a continuing basis. (2.2B)
  • DOL will continue pension and health education campaigns to: 1) raise public awareness about where to seek assistance about their rights; 2) educate workers and their employers about health and pension plans; 3) provide individual technical assistance to workers who have questions about their health and pension benefits or need assistance in obtaining those benefits; and 4) provide information to employers and plan sponsors about their responsibilities under the various laws.  An informed and knowledgeable customer (worker or business) is an asset to ensuring compliance with the laws and will positively impact our efforts at recovering benefits for participants.  (2.2C)
  • DOL will develop and refine compliance guides for the public and the Department's customer service staff to assist them in handling inquiries and ensure that American workers and their families receive the important protections afforded under the numerous enacted health care laws.  (2.2C)
  • DOL's Quality Case Management strategy employs creative methods and services to assist recovery and return to work, including early case management by nurses who coordinate medical treatment and reemployment.  Further, the non-adversarial nature of the FECA program allows DOL to work with Federal agencies and employee unions to facilitate the return to work process.  (2.2D1, 2.2D7)
  • DOL will facilitate returns to work through better oversight of medical treatment:
    • Continue the Quality Case Management Program, in which new injury cases receive early intervention from nurses allowing case management to begin at a point when it can be much more effective.
    • Actively manage disability cases in the early Continuation of Pay (COP) period.
    • Improve access to expert medical evaluation.
    • Communicate more effectively with medical providers, through better technology and interaction between treating physicians and nurse case managers.
    • Screen cases for appropriateness of medical and pharmacological treatment, identifying outliers for directed review.  (2.2D1, 2.2D7)
  • DOL will assess implementing recommendations stemming from the FY 2002 evaluation study of FECA's Early Nurse Intervention program.  The study’s objective is to evaluate the Nurse program’s support of FECA’s Quality Case Management and  return-to-work goals.  (2.2D1)
  • Through ESA/OWCP's work with OSHA, DOL will assist Federal agencies to reduce injuries, improve timely filing of injury reports, and assist injured workers to obtain benefits and return to work.  Specific actions include conducting periodic conferences, technical assistance or informational meetings with the agencies, expanding electronic filing of claims documents, and widening access to OWCP case data and other program information through the Internet and other automated applications.  (2.2D1)
  • DOL will continue to provide public recognition of Federal agency performance to reduce Lost Production Days and improve the timeliness of filing Notices of Injury.  (2.2D1)
  • Using the FECA future benefit liability model developed in FY 1999, DOL will share forecasting information in conjunction with its work with Federal employing agencies to reduce lost production days.  (2.2D1)
  • DOL will continue to improve mail intake and document imaging processes and increasing paperless operations. (2.2D1, 2.2D6, 2.2D7)
  • DOL will reach the implementation phases of its automated system redesign project;  redesign features will improve system administration and management, integrate to a common platform, centralize databases, improve communications and information access for program customers, modernize medical bill processing, improve security, and simplify claims work processes. (2.2D1, 2.2D6, 2.2D7)
  • DOL will continue multiple broad-based strategies to improve customer services, gauge customer needs, and measure customer satisfaction in the FECA program.  These include:
    • A multi-faceted Communications Redesign initiative, including upgrade of telecommunications hardware and operation of a central call center, and improvement of national and district automated call intake systems;
    • Focus groups held with Federal agency representatives to assess agency assistance requirements and improve agency assistance programs;
    • A call-back survey of claimant callers to our district offices, and development of other surveys for various customer groups;
    • Measurement of district office performance against nation-wide standards to ensure a high level of caller access to telephone services, prompt and accurate responses, professional handling, and high quality. (2.2D1, 2.2D6, 2.2D7)
  • DOL will continue to use mediation skills, outreach, telephonic intervention, and other communication tools to work closely with parties to contested cases under the Longshore program as a means for reaching quicker resolution of disputed issues in those cases.  (2.2D2)
  • DOL will continue to use outreach and technical assistance activities with all Black Lung program stakeholder communities to promote an atmosphere of understanding and constructive cooperation in support of fewer challenges to program adjudication decisions.  DOL will also work with Black Lung's authorized diagnostic provider community to emphasize the need for complete and accurate medical reports that satisfy program requirements and further support fewer challenges to program adjudication decisions.  (2.2D3)
  • DOL will continue building new and improved automated data processing tools to support the timeliness and quality of Federal employee compensation case handling, case management, and return to work. (2.2D1, 2.2D6, 2.2D7)
  • DOL will continue to improve overall management of the Federal Employees' Compensation Fund by expanding quality review of medical servicing and pursuing the redesign and modernization of medical bill payment processes.  Quality review will include centralized prior authorization of requests for medical treatment, focus reviews to ensure that proper treatment regimens are followed, bill review to identify duplication or other improper practices, and reevaluation and development of new treatment guidelines.  (2.2D7)
  • DOL will continue to improve fiscal integrity by using fee schedules to reduce medical, pharmacy and hospital service costs under FECA.  (2.2D7)
  • The Periodic Roll Management system will continue to review long-term cases on the disability roll and reevaluate case status for change in medical condition and potential for return to work.  (2.2D6, 2.2D7)
  • DOL will assume responsibility for under-funded defined benefit pension plans where necessary to ensure that participants’ pension benefits are continuously provided. About 3,200 trusteed plans (with over 700,000 participants) will be under PBGC’s management in FY 2003. To manage this workload, PBGC will continue to improve in the delivery of customer service by listening to customers and assessing ways to better meet their expectations.  (2.2E)

Significant New or Enhanced Efforts in FY 2003:

  • DOL will work with States to improve benefit payment accuracy and reemployment by working against targets for payment accuracy and entered employment target established in FY 2002.  States will implement additional data collection to obtain entered employment data on a continuing basis and use it to guide their reemployment assistance to Unemployment Insurance claimants.  States will have guidance on the extent and nature of erroneous denials from denied claim accuracy data (a part of the Benefit Accuracy Measurement – BAM – system.)  DOL will also provide States with additional analytical data from BAM on the nature and cause of overpayments to assist them in crafting better front-end procedures for preventing overpayments.  (2.2A)
  • DOL will develop enhancements to existing systems for the early detection of multi-claimant fraud schemes in cooperation with the states.  (2.2A)
  • DOL will initiate a more streamlined system for processing foreign labor certifications.  The process should reduce the time an employer waits for a Labor Department response on its application from an estimated 24 months to six months (the Immigration and Naturalization Service review takes additional time).  In the new system, DOL regional staff will review applications; in their review they will rely on employers’ previous recruitment efforts to establish the lack of available qualified workers for the positions to be filled by foreign labor.  In the previous procedure, the State workforce agency first conducted time-consuming advertisements to confirm that the employer was paying a prevailing wage and that there were no domestic applicants for the opening, then DOL regional staff completed the review.  (2.2B)
  • DOL will implement a data system that will enable tracking and reporting the time required to complete each application for alien foreign labor certification.  Under the old “two-tier” system, only the number of cases on hand was available.  The new data system will enable the process to be managed, not only by the number of cases on hand, but also by the speed of the service being provided, permitting monitoring of overall timeliness and the identification of types of applications which require additional attention.  (2.2B)
  • DOL will continue to develop new and improved ADP tools to support the timeliness and quality of Energy Employees Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA) decisions, benefit delivery, and case management.  (2.2D5, 2.2D6)
  • DOL will seek to improve financial performance and ensure proper medical care for injured workers by developing improved processing of Prior Authorizations before surgery and other medical procedures and development of Medical Utilization Review (UR).  Through UR, FECA will monitor the level and appropriateness of medical services as related to medical condition.  (2.2D7)
  • DOL will inaugurate a new program aimed at timely issuance of estimated lump sum benefits to eligible participants within one year of PBGC’s trusteeship of the plan.  This is in contrast to the three years now required, and will affect the 40 percent of participants who are eligible to take their pension benefit in a lump sum.  The program will be developed in FY 2002 and implemented in FY 2003. (2.2E)
  • Based on a measure defined, baseline values established, and annual targets set during FY 2002, DOL will begin to report on the accuracy of benefits it pays.  (2.2E)
  • As DOL achieves the performance goal of 95 percent of first benefit payments within ninety days of completed application, it will also begin to measure the percentage paid within sixty days.  (2.2E)
  • To begin to measure improvement in the timeliness of processing refunds, waivers, and reconsideration requests received from pension practitioners. (2.2E)

Cross-Cutting Programs and Issues

To fulfill the Department’s employee benefit plan responsibilities, PWBA works with HHS, Treasury, the National Economic Council, the Bureau of Census, BLS, the Thrift Savings Board, the Solicitor’s Office, and the Small Business Administration (SBA).  PWBA has established a Federal-State-local partnership to help employee benefit plan participants who are at risk, (e.g., dislocated workers) understand not only their rights, but also how their employment status may affect their pension and health benefits.

DOL/ESA/OWCP's Federal Employees' Compensation Act (FECA) program involves every Federal agency in the filing and management of injury compensation claims, providing services to injured workers, and assisting in the effective administration of the FECA program.  For example, the FECA program coordinates with the Office of Personnel Management on matters of benefit elections, and in some specialized claims, with State and local police agencies on matters of entitlement and benefits.  Federal agencies that undertake special initiatives related to management of their injured employees' claims work closely with FECA program offices at the national and regional levels to evaluate best practices.  Other efforts improve communication and cooperation to reduce lost productivity due to workplace injuries.  Through FECA's Agency Query System, the Department provides secure, on-line information to enable agencies to provide better service to their injured employees and assist in FECA claims processing and case management.  In new injury cases, the Department assigns nurses to coordinate among injured workers, agencies, and medical providers to resolve issues and facilitate recovery and return to work.  DOL/ESA/OWCP is working with all Federal agencies to improve timeliness of injury claims submissions - in part through expansion of electronic claims submission - and to increase re-employment opportunities, and has established ongoing measures of agency performance, which are posted on the Internet.

DOL's OWCP and OSHA work with Federal agencies to reduce new workplace accident/illness rates, speed the timeliness of reporting new injuries to the Department of Labor, and reduce lost production days rates.  OWCP works with Federal agencies by intervening in lost time cases, providing case management, and tracking disability time lost during the Continuation of Pay period immediately following an injury. DOL measures agencies’ performance on its website at http://www.dol-esa.gov/fesii.  DOL tracks and posts detailed agency (sub-agency) performance in terms of timely injury notice submission.  DOL/ESA/OWCP works in tandem with OSHA and the Office of Disability Employment Policy to help agencies reduce accidents/illnesses and speed return to work.

DOL/ESA/OWCP has primary responsibility under the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA), issuing compensation and medical benefits to eligible applicants, but must also coordinate with three other Federal departments to ensure the successful administration of this program.  The Department of Energy's Office of Worker Advocacy assists workers in filing State workers' compensation claims and providing exposure histories at Federal facilities where covered workers were employed; the Department of Health and Human Services is responsible for establishing guidelines and conducting reconstruction of radiation exposures<> which may be related to a worker's cancer; and the Justice Department is obligated to notify uranium workers eligible for benefits under the Radiation Exposure Compensation Act that they may also receive compensation under the energy workers' program.

Under a memorandum of understanding with the Social Security Administration (SSA), DOL/ESA/OWCP's Division of Coal Mine Workers' Compensation administers and monitors benefit payments and provides claims maintenance services for claims previously approved by SSA.


Outcome Goal 2.3—Increase Employment and Earnings for Retrained Workers

FY 2003 Performance Goals

Total Funds for This Outcome Goal (in Billions)

         

Fiscal Years

Budget Authority

Outlays

FY 2003

$ 1.6

$ 1.8

FY 2002

$ 1.5

$ 1.4

FY 2001

$ 1.8

$ 0.9

FY 2000

$ 1.6

$ 1.2

FY 1999

$ 1.5

$ 1.3

A.

Increase the employment, retention, and earnings replacement of individuals registered under the WIA dislocated worker program.  In Program Year 2003:

  • 78 percent will be employed in the first quarter after program exit;
  • 88 percent of those employed in the first quarter after program exit will be employed in the third quarter after program exit; and
  • Those who are employed in the first quarter after program exit and are still employed in the third quarter after program exit will have 98 percent of their pre-dislocation earnings.

B.

Increase the employment, retention, and earnings replacement of workers dislocated in important part because of trade and who receive trade adjustment assistance benefits.  In Fiscal Year 2003:

  • 78 percent will be employed in the first quarter after program exit;
  • 88 percent of those employed in the first quarter after program exit will be employed in the third quarter after program exit; and
  • Those who are employed in the first quarter after program exit and are still employed in the third quarter after program exit will earn, on average, 90 percent of their pre-separation earnings.

Means and Strategies

Operating Agency:  ETA

Sustained Efforts in FY 2003:

Context for 2.3A:  In PY 2003, the WIA Dislocated Worker program will be starting its fourth year of operation.  The strategic goals and means of the previous years provide a context for 2003. In PY 2003, ETA will monitor the states’ performance and operations, determine which states are not achieving their performance goals, and provide customized technical assistance.  ETA will also prepare recommendations and reports regarding the re-authorization of WIA.

This plan builds upon previous years’ strategies to better serve workers with strategic partners.  The PY 2002 program objectives are: 1) ensuring timely, accurate, consistent and meaningful financial and performance data at the program level to facilitate informed management of dislocated worker program operations at all levels; 2) improving system response to customer needs; 3) improving wage replacement for dislocated workers; 4) improving the system of accountability for performance; and 5) strengthening the One-Stop Centers system and partnerships formed to improve services for jobseekers and employers.

  • DOL will enhance universal access of all dislocated workers to services available through One-Stop Career Centers by: 1) supporting outreach to groups of dislocated workers through community-based organizations, faith-based organizations, organized labor, and other entities, State Rapid Response units, etc., enlisting their assistance in assessment and referral of individuals to local One-Stop Career Centers; and 2) expanding access to services through enhanced use of Internet, telephone and other technologies to provide a broad spectrum of access points not dependent on a single method or medium. (2.3A)
  • DOL will continue efforts begun in PY 2002 to identify reasons why dislocated worker jobseekers do not achieve a successful labor market transition (as defined by WIA’s core measures (jobs, retention, earnings, credential)), and take steps to respond to the findings.  (2.3A)
  • DOL will continue to invest in engaging private-sector employers both as customers and partners in the workforce development system, by communications, conferences, and contractor support to business leads within the State Workforce Investment Boards.  The Department will strive to improve dislocated worker program services for the business customer by:
    • Seeking to ensure that training available in local areas is directly linked to employer-identified skill shortages, in part by improving employer participation in the development and use of Eligible Training Provider Lists in local areas and States;
    • Through community audits, sectoral analyses, and other means, promoting training of dislocated workers in occupational areas identified by the business community as most in demand;
    • Improving the employer-related services provided through Rapid Response assistance, and
    • Increasing employers’ awareness of the requirements of the Worker Adjustment and Retraining Notification (WARN) Act (see second bullet, part a. below under Significant New or Enhanced Efforts). (2.3A)
  • DOL will continue services to dislocated workers who are likely to exhaust Unemployment Insurance benefits as identified by the Worker Profiling and Re-employment Services component of the workforce system by improving the assessment of claimants’ needs and providing appropriate Wagner-Peyser Act and WIA Title I re-employment services (e.g., job search workshops, counseling, referrals to suitable openings) and other needed assistance. (2.3A)
  • DOL will improve the validity and quality of the data used to manage performance of the Trade Act programs by:
    • Achieving full reporting and a high standard of accuracy for data reported in the Trade Act Participant Report (TAPR) through constant review of State data submissions and by ensuring that participant data systems are part of the states’ normal evaluation and monitoring systems;
    • Completing training, by the end of fiscal year 2002, for all states on reporting requirements and data quality standards and providing targeted technical assistance to correct reporting or data quality problems;
    • Updating the TAPR to reflect any new data needs that result from reauthorization and/or reform of the programs and providing technical assistance and training to the states as needed; and
    • Communicating suitable employment goals to the states and local offices by the end of fiscal year 2002 so that suitable outcomes are understood and pursued for each participant at the levels where training and other services are actually provided. (2.3B)
  • DOL will institute measures to increase productivity and reduce investigation time for petition determinations.  These measures will be aimed at reducing the percentage of investigations that exceed the statutory time limits and will depend on increases in resources such as contract staff and/or additional DOL staff for conducting investigations. Instituting electronic processing of trade petitions and related documents will be a key approach to achieving the objective of reduced investigation time for petition determinations.  Electronically receiving and transmitting petitions, company and customer surveys and decision documents to the interested parties holds the potential to significantly increase the efficiency and timeliness of the determination process. (2.3B)
  • DOL will continue to pursue full integration of the Trade Act programs into the One-Stop system and the WIA programs by assisting states and local boards to overcome barriers that stand in the way of increasing the percentage of Trade Act program participants who are coenrolled in the dislocated worker program.  DOL will also use the Trade Taskforce to identify opportunities to better integrate the Trade Act programs and the WIA dislocated worker program.  DOL will prepare and deliver training sessions that will disseminate information and best practices for use by States and local boards. (2.3B)
  • DOL will continue to conduct region-based training sessions for all TAA/NAFTA-TAA State staff. These sessions provide State staff with all of the information they need to operate the Trade Act programs effectively, efficiently, and in accord with the law and the regulations. In addition, training programs at the State level will be conducted as needed to compensate for staff turnover and other changes in a particular State. (2.3B)
  • DOL will continue to promote the co-enrollment policy in the context of One-Stop service delivery methods under the Workforce Investment Act. The Trade Act programs and the Dislocated Worker program under JTPA developed a policy of co-enrolling eligible dislocated workers in both programs. This policy aimed to provide benefits and services to workers in a way that neither program could do alone. (2.3B)

Significant New or Enhanced Efforts in FY 2003:

  • PY 2003 will be the final year of WIA prior to consideration of its reauthorization.  Objectives for the dislocated worker program in PY 2003 will include improving data quality, improving services to working adults, and strengthening the One-Stop Center system.  Program reviews will focus on financial and performance accountability and be undertaken in part to identify promising practices.  DOL will encourage States and local areas to explore means for improving outcomes for a range of dislocated workers, including individuals with Limited English Proficiency.
  • Based upon the input from GAO, the WIA Readiness Teams, partners, and contractor studies, DOL will complete plans to improve how the program and the One-Stop system responds to customers’ needs and to improve the quality and timeliness of data in performance management systems.  This will assure that the programs can be managed in a more effective, efficient manner, that more adults will receive appropriate employment and training services, and that the GPRA employment goals will be met or exceeded.
    1. Strategies to improve the dislocated worker program components of participant assessment, case management, eligibility determination, informed customer choice, and customized and responsive services involve using several means to assess current practices, identify promising examples, and develop methods for bridging gaps between current and exemplary practice. Through collaborative assessments, DOL and State and local partners will determine appropriate means of improving the aforementioned components, identify key risk areas, and work intensively with those areas with specific needs.  Demonstration projects will be supported to implement more effective practices in some states and areas.  The reconstituted National Dislocated Worker Workgroup provides a framework for progress in most of the areas of emphasis, including increasing the timeliness of employer notices under the Worker Adjustment and Retraining Notification Act (WARN) and Rapid Response activities.

      By the end of PY 2003, a large majority of States and local areas will be providing sophisticated customized employment and training services at One-Stop Centers, through internet web centers, and with business, community-based, and faith-based partners’ support.  (2.3A)

    2. The strategy to improve the performance accountability system will parallel the process to improve the program components.  DOL staff in national and regional offices will monitor the reports’ timeliness and validity to determine which states meet the standard level of confidence; for those states which do not meet the standard, DOL will develop and provide customized technical assistance to assure they meet the standards.  These efforts will provide a more reliable, valid, and accurate reporting system and assure more credible reporting to Congress and the public.  During PY 2002, a joint workgroup is to review the performance accountability system for dislocated workers.  The group’s reports will serve as the basis for DOL consideration of improvements to the reporting and accountability systems.  Improvements in the timeliness of data are expected to be implemented late in 2002, for applications in 2003. This menu will include measures on impact of customers served, broader customer satisfaction, comparisons benchmarked with related One-Stop Centers and competition.  Potential improvements will be considered for inclusion in the recommendations for WIA reauthorization to the Congress.  If approved and implemented, these changes will enable the Assistant Secretary for Employment and Training to better measure and justify the program’s impact, value, and benefits to Congress and the publi

      The review will include consideration of One-Stop system measures and measures on impact of customers served, broader customer satisfaction, comparisons benchmarked with related One-Stop career centers and competition. To improve the quality of competitive incumbent and dislocated worker grants, DOL will continue the strategy, begun in the previous year, to sponsor “bidders’ conferences” for 50 percent of competitive procurements.  The workgroups’ recommended technical changes to the Assistant Secretary for Employment and Training might also be included in the recommendations for reauthorization to the Congress. The bidders’ conferences will be expected to provide better proposals – and later projects – to better meet the needs of dislocated and incumbent workers.  All the above require contractor support to complete.   If approved and implemented, these changes will enable the Assistant Secretary for Employment and Training to better measure and justify the program’s impact, value, and benefits to Congress, WIA stakeholders and the public. (2.3A)

    3. A strategy to improve the “wage replacement rate” goal will consist of following up to activities begun in PY 2002.  Research findings on factors affecting wage replacement rates and promising practices and policies, developed in the previous year, will be provided to the One-Stop network and related partners, showcased in national conferences, and available in guidance from the DOL WIA websites.  This will require contractor support to complete in 2003.  The factors will inform DOL and its partners as we consider the relationship between wage replacement, total compensation, customer needs, and customer satisfaction.  The impact of this strategy will be to enable State/local program operators to better understand the interplay between wages and customer satisfaction, to understand effective approaches to improving wages for dislocated workers, and to more accurately measure wage outcomes and hence, implement effective approaches to reemployment for their dislocated worker customers. (2.3A)
  • DOL will transition to a system of electronic grant application filing and program and financial reporting for National Emergency Grants.  The efficiency gained from the electronic filing and abbreviated filing requirements will enable grant award decisions to be announced within 15 days of receipt of a complete application.  The current processing time standard is 45 days.  Similarly, electronic system will improve the timeliness with which program and financial data are available thus enabling improved program monitoring and technical assistance targeting.  All NEG grant application filing will become electronically based in FY 2003.  Implementation of the electronic system is a key DOL “e-government” initiative. (2.3A)

Cross-Cutting Programs and Issues

The Department will implement pilot and demonstration projects to improve local areas’ ability to understand business and labor market trends and undertake comprehensive planning for services to dislocated workers and incumbent workers.  For example, DOL will focus on:

  1. Supporting community audit, incumbent worker and sectoral employment demonstration projects that develop, collect and analyze information regarding economic and labor market trends in specific geographic areas, industries, or sectors.  This will improve real-time workforce investment information and services, prevent dislocations, more effectively target training resources, and support business growth and worker welfare.
  2. Continuing to work with the Departments of Commerce, Treasury, and others to support strategies to assist communities in developing comprehensive economic adjustment strategies to deal with dislocations with community-wide impact.

DOL also will continue to work in close cooperation with State and local partners in monitoring and overseeing the workforce development system and with federal partners in promoting unified planning at the State and local levels.

The Department will continue to collaborate with other Federal agencies, including Commerce, Agriculture, HUD, Treasury and SBA, as well as State and local governments, in programs for economic development and community adjustment assistance in areas affected by worker dislocations, including trade-impacted areas.  These government entities work with the Community Adjustment and Investment Program and the North American Development Bank, created by the implementing legislation for the North American Free Trade Agreement, to increase business investment opportunities and employment opportunities for dislocated workers.

DOL will also work across One-Stop partner programs to identify and eliminate disincentives for co-enrolling individuals in multiple programs, in order to improve program integration and outcomes for jobseekers.

4.3        DOL Strategic Goal 3—Quality Workplaces

DOL STRATEGIC GOAL 3

QUALITY WORKPLACES
Foster quality workplaces that are safe, healthy, and fair

OUTCOME GOALS:

  • Reduce workplace injuries, illnesses, and fatalities
  • Foster equal opportunity workplaces
  • Reduce exploitation of child labor, protect the basic rights of workers, and strengthen labor markets

Total Funds for This Goal (in Billions):

Fiscal Years Budget Authority Outlays
FY 2003 $ 0.9 $ 1.1
FY 2002 $ 1.0 $ 1.0
FY 2001 $ 1.0 $ 0.8
FY 2000 $ 0.8 $ 0.8
FY 1999 $ 0.7 $ 0.7

This strategic goal is aimed at guaranteeing every working American a safe and healthful workplace with equal opportunity for all.  Also, the Department is committed to protecting workers’ rights and economic status and improving the working conditions of children throughout the world.

Department of Labor programs and agencies with the primary operational responsibility for achieving this strategic goal include the Employment Standards Administration’s Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, the Mine Safety and Health Administration, the Bureau of International Labor Affairs, and the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Administration and Management.  In addition, the Office of the Solicitor, the Women’s Bureau, the Office on Disability Employment Policy, and the Office of the Inspector General provide indirect support to this strategic goal.

OSHA and MSHA have been reviewing their strategic and performance goals, measures, and strategies to reflect the focus and priorities of the Administration. OSHA and MSHA will in FY 2003 continue to expand and refine compliance assistance and outreach efforts, focusing on the prevention of workplace injuries and illnesses and directing training programs to the needs of a 21st Century workforce.  The budget request and the annual performance plan’s means and strategies represent the evolution of the Department’s compliance assistance and outreach initiatives, and include building on successes with expert systems, electronic compliance assistance tools and technology-enabled training, focus on root causes of persistent safety problems, and on emerging needs identified by compliance assistance specialists and other front-line staff, in order to provide more direct assistance to the public.

The ESA performance goals for FY 2003 support the Department's commitment to the protection of the American workforce in the 21st Century and ESA's efforts strongly reflect the Department's current areas of emphasis.  The Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs goal to improve the equal employment opportunity performance of Federal contractors reflects the commitment of the Department to enforce the laws that protect all American workers and give hope to those individuals who have been denied the right to a productive, meaningful work life because of their race, gender, nationality, veterans status, or disability.

The FY 2003 performance goals for the Bureau of International Labor Affairs (ILAB) support the Department's commitment to the education, training, and protection of workers and children in developing and transition countries. As the economies of the world continue to become more interdependent, the importance of ensuring respect for internationally recognized core labor standards among countries increases, contributing to the labor dimension of the trade policy agenda of the U.S. Government.  As such, through our support of efforts to eradicate abusive child labor and to advance workers' protections and economic status throughout the world, ILAB is contributing to efforts to increase economic opportunity and security both here and abroad and meet the challenges of the 21st Century.   

The FY 2003 outcome and performance goals for this strategic goal follow.  Detailed information on every performance goal, including indicator, data source, baseline and explanatory comments, can be found in Appendix A.


Outcome Goal 3.1—Reduce Workplace Injuries, Illnesses, and Fatalities

FY 2003 Performance Goals

Total Funds for This Outcome Goal (in Millions)

Fiscal Years

Budget Authority

Outlays

     

FY 2003

$ 778

$ 780

FY 2002

$ 787

$ 783

FY 2001

$ 758

$ 723

FY 2000

$ 653

$ 626

FY 1999

$ 608

$ 595

A.

Reduce the number of mine fatalities by 15 percent annually, and the nonfatal injury incidence rate by  26 percent  below the projected baselines. 

B.

Reduce  the percentage of respirable coal dust samples exceeding the applicable standards by 5 percent for designated occupations, and reduce the percentage of silica dust samples in metal and nonmetal mines exceeding the applicable standards by 5 percent for high-risk occupations.  

Reduce the percentage of  noise exposures above the citation level in  all mines by 5 percent.

Reduce the number of citations/orders  for the diesel particulate matter regulation cited in all mines. 

C.

Reduce three of the most significant types of workplace injuries and causes of illnesses by 15 percent annually.

D.

Reduce injuries and illnesses by 10 percent annually in four industries characterized by high-hazard workplaces.

E.

Reduce injuries and illnesses (LWDII) by 20 percent in at least 125,000 workplaces where OSHA initiates an intervention.

F.

Decrease fatalities in the construction industry by15 percent [from baseline], by focusing on the four leading causes of fatalities (falls, struck-by, crushed-by, and electrocutions and electrical injuries).

Means and Strategies

Operating Agencies:  OSHA, MSHA

Sustained Efforts in FY 2003:

  • DOL’s mine safety and health regulatory philosophy and practice will be refocused to place additional emphasis on accident prevention and expand existing outreach efforts in the mining community shifting the emphasis from after-the-fact enforcement to compliance assistance and prevention, focusing attention on root causes of persistent safety problems and helping mine workers and operators address these problems.  DOL will also direct informational outreach programs to occupations with a high incidence of exposures to airborne contaminants and physical agents, with particular attention to dust, noise and diesel particulates. The Department will focus attention on areas where sampling indicates excessive dust and noise levels and will work with operators who are having high exposure problems.  (3.1A–B)
  • Through our computer infrastructure, DOL will also create Internet portals to provide miners, mine operators and our State partners  with mine specific accident, injury, illness  and compliance information.  Through this system, mine operators will only be able to access data related to their particular mining operation.  Improved access to data will facilitate the timely development of measures to prevent conditions that cause hazardous and unhealthy situations.  (3.1A–B)
  • DOL will continue to target workplace exposures, injuries, illnesses and fatalities in line with its Strategic Plan.  OSHA will use its worksite-targeting program to notify over 13,000 employers with high injury and illness rates and provide an opportunity for compliance assistance through the Agency’s Consultation Program.  Local partnership agreements will be established.  (3.1C–F)
  • DOL will continue to utilize a variety of compliance assistance, outreach and cooperative approaches to prevent injuries and illnesses and to reach small businesses and targeted audiences.  Approaches include the Consultation and Voluntary Protection Programs, electronic software systems, web-based training,  training grants, local partnership agreements, and field compliance assistance.  These efforts will be linked to OSHA’s performance goals in a coordinated, complementary manner.  OSHA’s State Consultation providers will be encouraged to target high-priority areas while serving the unique needs of employers—particularly small employers in their States.  The Voluntary Protection Programs—which involved 583 worksites in FY 2001—will identify worksites in the industries and hazards covered by the Plan; partnership agreements will be processed in these areas as well.  (3.1C–F)
  • DOL will continue to work with its State plan partners to support the accomplishment of individual State strategic and annual performance plans, which align with OSHA’s approach under GPRA.  The State strategic and annual performance plans all target reductions in exposures and injuries, illnesses and fatalities, tailored to each State’s individual priorities.  (3.1C–D, F)

Significant New or Enhanced Efforts in FY 2003:

  • Currently, DOL’s resources devoted to metal and nonmetal mining operations have been outstripped by the rapid growth of the metal and nonmetal mining sector.  DOL will expand MSHA’s existing outreach efforts in metal and nonmetal mining to provide crucial assistance to operators and miners in identifying hazards and understanding the requirements for compliance. (3.1A–B)
  • To meet the academic and technological challenges of the 21st Century, DOL will implement state-of-the-art-teaching methodologies, including flexible training such as automated distributed learning, use of CD and DVD programs at mine sites that provide self-paced interactive programs with enhanced visual capabilities tailored to accommodate the mining industry.  This training will include safety systems management, awareness of the latest advancements in mining methods, and a working knowledge of new mining equipment and will enhance DOL’s ability to effectively enforce the safety standards and advise mine operators in ways to improve safety conditions. (3.1A–B)
  • DOL will expand compliance assistance efforts in FY 2003 through OSHA’s Consultation projects and computer-based outreach projects.  The increase for the on-site Consultation program will be directed to State projects that encourage small, high hazard employers to provide safe and healthful workplaces through the application of management systems.  Electronic software systems will support electronic compliance assistance products that use text, illustrations, photographs, and simple animations to instruct users about occupational hazards, OSHA standards, and recommended practices in a given industry.  (3.1C-F)
  • DOL will improve training delivered by OSHA and focus training on the provision of compliance assistance.  DOL will support the continued development and implementation of the Agency's technology-enabled training initiative, and core competency training for OSHA staff on the provision of compliance assistance.  OSHA plans to use distance learning technology to provide training and education assistance to employees and employers rather than relying solely on traditional methodologies.  Given the technological advances of the past few years, and increased demand for OSHA training, it is clear that improved training mechanisms will improve training opportunities for Agency and State staff, and the private sector.  Web-based courses will be developed and offered, and all course materials will be placed on the Intranet for use by the Agency=s staff in the delivery of safety and health information to the public.  DOL will also develop and conduct training for Federal and State staff on providing compliance assistance directly to employers. (3.1C-F)

Cross-Cutting Programs and Issues

Within the Department, OSHA, MSHA, BLS, ESA, and ETA work together to accomplish performance goals for reducing workplace injuries, illnesses, and fatalities. 

Collaborative efforts to ensure consistency in regulatory actions that affect workers in both OSHA and MSHA jurisdictions are ongoing. To help the Department meet its performance goal of reducing illnesses due to silica exposure and other workplace-related diseases, MSHA and NIOSH have developed working relationships in several areas, including compliance assistance and enforcement initiatives across all occupations where overexposure to silica must be reduced.

As part of the effort to redesign the OSHA injury and illness recordkeeping system, BLS and OSHA collaborated on the design of the new injury and illness forms, worked together to assure a smooth transition in the statistical systems, and coordinated outreach and training efforts.  The agencies standardized data collection forms and limited duplicative data collections. 

ESA and OSHA are working together to make the safety and health of every Federal worker a central value in Federal workplaces and to ensure that, when injuries do occur, Federal employees are given the best possible care and are returned to work as quickly as possible.  The joint initiative includes numerical goals for Federal agencies to measure progress on the objectives of reducing workplace injuries and illnesses, reducing the average duration of time away from work due to work injuries, and speeding the return to work.

OSHA is coordinating efforts with ETA to assist the Laborers International Union in developing an anthrax biohazard training curriculum.  ETA awarded a training grant to the Laborers to develop the training with OSHA’s assistance.  At first, the Laborers’ certified waste workers will use the curriculum to upgrade their skills.  Later, the curriculum will be used by other organizations, including OSHA, to train workers in the safe removal of biochemical agents.

As a result of the recent terrorist attacks, OSHA continues to work closely with a number of Federal agencies to protect workers who are exposed to potential biological and chemical hazards that may be introduced to the workplace, such as anthrax.  OSHA efforts with the U.S. Postal Service, the CDC, the FBI, EPA, and FEMA resulted in an informational matrix that provides guidance to employers about how to protect their workers against these types of exposures.  At the massive cleanup operations underway at the World Trade Center, the CDC, NIOSH, EPA, and OSHA closely monitor exposures to minimize health risks from a variety of substances, including lead and silica.

OSHA coordinated with the Department of Transportation  and others to help identify and remove potential risks to road construction workers, who are exposed to safety and health hazards that often lead to serious physical harm and death.  Roadway workers face hazards from crane use, trench activities, falls from heights, lead exposure and silica exposure; the majority of fatalities involve workers struck by motorists and construction vehicles.  As a result of this coordination, OSHA has updated its construction standards that deal with workzone safety. The OSHA standards are now consistent with the Department of Transportation’s Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices.

Realizing the need to reach out to the small business community, OSHA is working with the SBA, and in particular with the SBA’s Office of Advocacy.  OSHA offers many resources designed specifically for smaller employers and has rewritten its Handbook for Small Businesses to incorporate suggestions made by the SBA.  OSHA’s Web Page for small businesses provides one‑stop shopping for the most popular materials for small businesses – from free on‑site consultation, to interactive computer software, to technical information and easy‑to‑follow guides for specific OSHA standards.  It also includes links to local OSHA offices and to the SBA.

MSHA and OSHA work closely with the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), which is responsible for conducting research on occupational safety and health issues.  One of the disadvantages that both agencies face as they seek to reduce the risk of occupational illness is a lack of good, solid data that ties specific illnesses to specific workplace conditions.  To correct that shortcoming, MSHA and OSHA coordinate their research requests to NIOSH in order to obtain more current data from a broader array of industries. OSHA and MSHA also participate in the establishment of NIOSH’s National Occupational Research Agenda.  NIOSH continues to provide research assistance that helps identify work processes where silica exposures occur.

Several other Federal agencies have safety and health responsibilities which overlap those of OSHA, MSHA, and ESA, including the U.S. Coast Guard (for protection of workers in industries dealing with water safety), the Federal Aviation Administration, and the Federal Railroad Administration, the Department of Energy, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, and the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms.  Through the use of memoranda of understanding and other interagency agreements, MSHA, OSHA, and ESA continue to work toward eliminating duplication and minimizing overlap of activities.

In recent years, OSHA has also expanded the Voluntary Protection Program (VPP) to include Federal agency sites Federal agencies with sites participating in the VPP include NASA, the U.S. Postal Service, and the Department of Defense.


Outcome Goal 3.2—Foster Equal Opportunity Workplaces

FY 2003 Performance Goals

Total Funds for This Outcome Goal (in Millions)

       

Fiscal Years

Budget Authority

Outlays

FY 2003

$ 106

$ 108

FY 2002

$ 102

$ 103

FY 2001

$ 100

$ 100

FY 2000

$ 101

$  90

FY 1999

$   82

$  81

A.

Federal contractors achieve equal opportunity workplaces as indicated by:

  1. Improving the equal employment opportunity performance of federal contractors and subcontractors within industries where data indicate the likelihood of equal employment opportunity problems is greatest. 
    In FY 2003, contractors in SIC Group 50 and SIC Group 87 that participate in specified DOL/OFCCP compliance assistance activities and are subsequently evaluated will have:
    • Better EEO performance in selection system evaluations as indicated by less severe Case Management Systems (CMS) closure types than contractors in SIC Groups 50 and 87 that did not participate in specified DOL/OFCCP compliance assistance activities.  In FY 2003 ESA/OFCCP will improve by an additional one (1) percent the rate of compliance findings over the baseline for SIC 50 and SIC 87, for a cumulative  improvement of two (2) percent.
    • Better EEO performance in selection system evaluations as indicated by less severe violations or deficiencies than contractors in SIC Groups 50 and 87 that did not participate in specified DOL/OFCCP compliance assistance activities.  In FY 2003 ESA/OFCCP will reduce by an additional one (1) percent the rate of findings of severe violations from the baseline for SIC 50 and SIC 87, for a cumulative reduction of two (2) percent.
    • Better EEO performance in selection system evaluations as indicated by evaluation type than contractors in SIC Groups 50 and 87 that did not participate in specified DOL/OFCCP compliance assistance activities.  In FY 2003 DOL/OFCCP will increase by an additional one (1) percent the rate of focused and offsite compliance evaluation types over the baseline for SIC 50 and SIC 87, for a cumulative  improvement of two (2) percent.
  1. Improving the equal employment opportunity performance of federal contractors and subcontractors that have had prior contact with DOL/OFCCP through evaluations, outreach, or technical assistance. 
    In FY 2003, contractors and subcontractors that are selected for evaluation, outreach, or compliance assistance activities will have:
    • Better EEO performance in selection system evaluations as indicated by less severe CMS closure types than contractors that did not have prior contact with DOL/OFCCP.  In FY 2003 DOL/OFCCP will improve by an additional one (1) percent the rate of compliance findings over the baseline for all supply and service closures, for a cumulative improvement of two (2) percent.
    • Better EEO performance in selection system evaluations as indicated by less severe violations or deficiencies than contractors that did not have prior contact with DOL/OFCCP.  In FY 2003 DOL/OFCCP will reduce by an additional one (1) percent the rate of findings of severe violations from the baseline, for a cumulative reduction of two (2) percent.
    • Better EEO performance in selection system evaluations as indicated by evaluation type than contractors that did not have prior contact with DOL/OFCCP.  In FY 2003 DOL/OFCCP will increase by an additional one (1) percent the rate of focused and offsite compliance evaluation types over the baseline for a cumulative improvement of two (2) percent.

B.

States that receive financial assistance under the Workforce Investment Act provide benefits and services in a nondiscriminatory manner as evidenced by:

  1. Positive change in access to benefits and services for persons with disabilities
  2. Increased use of techniques for voluntary resolution of complaints to achieve prompt results.

Means and Strategies

Operating Agencies:  ESA, OASAM

Sustained Efforts in FY 2003:

  • DOL will continue to expand its compliance assistance plan efforts and continue its fair and balanced enforcement program with the tiered compliance evaluation strategy. For all  contractors and subcontractors selected for compliance evaluations (including compliance checks, off-site review of records, focused reviews, full compliance evaluations and complaint investigations) , DOL/OFCCP will provide compliance assistance before, during and after the particular evaluation event.  In addition, targeted contractors and subcontractors will receive compliance assistance outside the evaluation process.  (3.2A)
  • DOL will continue to conduct compliance evaluations and complaint investigations under all DOL authorities, including Executive Order 11246, Section 503 of the Rehabilitation Act and 38 U.S.C. 4212 of the Vietnam Era Veterans Readjustment Assistance Act (VEVRAA). In this manner, DOL/OFCCP will enhance its compliance evaluations for supply and service contractors and subcontractors, individuals with disabilities, and special and disabled veterans. (3.2A)
  • DOL will utilize performance measurements and indicators to enable it to focus compliance and technical assistance efforts to meet the goal established in FY 2002. DOL/OFCCP’s Strategic Formulation Team and Executive staff will monitor program efforts. (3.2A)
  • DOL will continue promotion of industry best practices in EEO and anti-discrimination programs by acknowledging employer efforts with the Exemplary Voluntary Efforts Award, the Secretary’s Opportunity Award, the Exemplary Public Interest Contribution Award, and the Industry Liaison Group Award.  (3.2A)
  • DOL will enhance customer service through interactive and personal public education and technical assistance training for stakeholder organizations.  (3.2A)
  • DOL will continue to disseminate model employer recruitment practices and will assist contractors in identifying resources for recruiting qualified individuals with disabilities, protected veterans, women, and minorities.  Such resources may include, but not be limited to, the nationwide network of One-Stop Centers established by the Workforce Investment Act.  (3.2A)
  • The effectiveness of the various components of existing compliance assistance materials will be evaluated, and changes or modifications to compliance assistance materials will be made as required to increase effectiveness or to reflect special needs or issues for an industry. (3.2A)
  • OASAM’s Civil Rights Center (CRC) external compliance assistance will focus on two major cities - Miami, and New York.  In 2002, statistical data on the number of One-Stop Centers will collected, compliance review timetable of One-Stop Center reviews will be developed, and One-Stop Accessibility review guide designed.  In 2003, the CRC will conduct technical assistance reviews of a representative sample of One-Stop Centers in the LWIAs of New York City and Miami, using the review guide to determine the extent of compliance with Federal laws and regulations on programmatic and physical accessibility for persons with disabilities.  Where significant non-compliance is identified, compliance assistance training will be provided to the LWIAs subsequent to the reviews.  In 2004, follow-up compliance reviews will be conducted to determine whether barriers identified prior to the compliance assistance training have been addressed. As part of the technical assistance reviews,  CRC seek to identify best practices and establish a repository that will be place on CRC website and shared with the DOL financially assisted State-level administered Workforce Investment Act (WIA) programs. (3.2B)
  • CRC will work with the Office of Disability Employment Policy (ODEP) to use research collected by ODEP on WIA State plans to assist in formulating the technical assistance review plans. (3.2B)
  • During 2003, CRC will request that all States provide copies of complaint logs for the entire State.  This data will be used to establish baseline data for a longitudinal study on the resolution of complaints to determine the utilization rate of ADR over the customary investigation process. (3.2B)
  • Although ADR training has been provided to State-level Equal Opportunity Officers more may be needed to enhance skills at the LWIA level.  Based on the analysis of the method of complaint resolution, in 2003, CRC will provide supplemental ADR training to the LWIAs in the States of New York and Florida on the use of alternative dispute resolution.  This compliance assistance is intended to increase skill level of staff responsible administering the complaint process, and increase the proportion of complaints resolved through ADR to a level greater than the 2002 baseline year.   The longitudinal study will span through FY 2004. (3.2B)

Significant New or Enhanced Efforts in FY 2003:

  • DOL/OFCCP will examine new methods for increased utilization of technology to enhance program quality, availability and interaction with federal contractor community.  (3.2A)
  • DOL/OFCCP will provide targeted industries and other Federal contractors with compliance assistance.   (3.2A)
  • Effectiveness of compliance assistance will be measured by comparing compliance evaluation outcomes between those industry establishments that received assistance and those that did not.   (3.2A)

Outcome Goal 3.3— Reduce Exploitation of Child Labor, Protect The Basic Rights of Workers, and Strengthen Labor Markets

FY 2003 Performance Goals

Total Funds for This Outcome Goal (in Millions)

   

Fiscal Years

Budget Authority

Outlays*

FY 2003

$   60

$ 203

FY 2002

$ 152

$ 131

FY 2001

$ 152

$   17

FY 2000

$  74

$   64

FY 1999

$  47

$   41

*Because of the long-term nature of ILAB's technical assistance, grant funds are expended over 3 to 5 years.  During the period of ILAB's increasing budget authority (mainly in grants), the corresponding increase in outlays does not occur until later years.

A.

Reduce exploitative child labor by promoting international efforts and targeting focused initiatives in selected countries to include these objectives:

  • Number of children in developing countries targeted for prevention and/or removal from child labor, particularly its worst forms (as defined in ILO Convention 182), through the funding of new DOL-IPEC programs. (Target to be established Fall 2002 in consultation with ILO/IPEC)
  • Number of children in developing countries prevented or removed from exploitative work through the implementation of ongoing DOL-IPEC programs. (Target to be established Fall 2002 in consultation with ILO/IPEC)
  • Number of families provided with training and/or income-generating alternatives to reduce their reliance on child labor and encourage children’s school attendance, through on-going DOL-IPEC programs. (Target to be established Fall 2002 in consultation with ILO/IPEC)
  • Establish baseline for a rate of drop out for children placed in educational settings through DOL’s Education Initiative.
  • Through DOL’s Education Initiative, an increase in the persistence to end of school year or end of program in target schools in areas with a high incidence of child labor.

B.

Improve living standards and conditions of work for workers in developing and transition countries

  • Number and percent of relevant government officials and members and officials of workers’ and employers’ organizations who are influential in determining living standards and working conditions and participating in USDOL project activities, who consider the project to have improved their conditions of work.  Target: To be determined following collection of baseline data by September 2002.
  • Number and percent of individuals whose economic situation has benefited from USDOL project assistance.   Target:  To be determined following collection of baseline data by September 2002.
    (A worker’s economic situation has improved if the individual: received an increase in wages, income or employment benefits, or improved their potential for increases in wages, income, employment benefits)
  • Number and percent of workplaces exposed to USDOL project assistance that have implemented new measures to prevent workplace accidents and illnesses.  Target: To be determined following collection of baseline data by September 2002.
  • Number of workers participating in pension funds that are government regulated by project partner agencies.  Target: To be determined following collection of baseline data by September 2002.

Means and Strategies

Operating Agencies:  ILAB

Sustained Efforts in FY 2003:

  • DOL activities in FY2003 will continue to support technical assistance programs through the International Labor Organization’s International Program on the Elimination of Child Labor. By the end of FY 2002, DOL will have funded ILO/IPEC projects totaling over $150 million. These include national “timebound” programs to eliminate the worst forms of child labor, sector-specific projects to eliminate hazardous or exploitative child labor, and statistical surveys on child labor.  DOL will continue to support ongoing IPEC efforts in countries that are committed to addressing the problem of child labor, helping reduce the incidence of child labor around the world, educating the public and policy-makers about this issue, and advocating and enhancing the worldwide movement against abusive child labor.  These activities will reinforce the ILO’s campaign to prioritize action against the worst forms of child exploitation.  (3.3A)
  • DOL will continue to conduct research and publish reports dealing with child labor exploitation and techniques for reducing its incidence around the world in order to educate the public and policy-makers. (3.3A)
  • Through the Education Initiative, DOL will continue to support innovative projects that provide access to basic education as a means to combat child labor.  The Education Initiative will fund projects in additional countries that strengthen the education components of IPEC projects, as well as independent projects that test innovative approaches to improve educational quality and relevance for children removed from child labor.  The projects will be implemented in various regions of the world where child labor is a significant problem.  Among the issues that these projects will address are how to improve remedial and transitional education for children removed from child labor; how to best mainstream children into the formal education system and increase retention rates; how to raise quality and relevance in non-formal and formal education settings; how to provide life skills and school-to-work transitions for children near legal working age; and how to improve the sustainability of these efforts. (3.3A)
  • Promote appropriate consideration of core labor standards in each bilateral or multilateral trade agreement negotiated by the United States. (3.3B)
  • Identify needs and establish programs for technical assistance, as appropriate, to promote core labor standards in countries that benefit from U.S. trade preference programs. (3.3B)
  • DOL will continue to work to promote improved living standards and conditions of work for workers through strategically targeted technical assistance to key developing and transition countries.  DOL’s partnership with the International Labor Organization (ILO) to assist interested countries to implement core labor standards will continue as will its work to strengthen social safety nets, carried out in partnership with other DOL agencies, and other organizations.  DOL will continue to work closely with U.S. embassies and USAID missions abroad to ensure that DOL’s projects are supportive of the broader U.S. Government country strategy and fully complement the assistance efforts of USAID and other USG agencies. (3.3B)
  • DOL will continue to improve its capacity to report on the achievement of its GPRA goal and to monitor and evaluate the performance of its international projects through the systematic collection and reporting of indicator data, and evaluation of projects at their mid-term and conclusion.   In an effort to replicate project successes, the lessons learned and best practices from our existing projects are being assessed and compiled for publication in an ILAB project handbook. (3.3 A and B)

Significant New or Enhanced Efforts in FY 2003:

  • With additional funding in FY 2003 for ILO/IPEC, DOL will expand its support for targeted projects, including the funding of new timebound programs aimed at eliminating the worst forms of child labor. (3.3A)
  • In selected countries the Education Initiative will conduct assessment and impact evaluation studies with partners such as USAID and the World Bank on the links between child labor and education.  These studies will document lessons learned and best practices to assist in the design of future education projects to benefit children removed from work. (3.3A)
  • With the ILO/IPEC and other partners, DOL will conduct a series of outreach efforts through which education experts and practitioners will share lessons and experiences gained in projects to educate children removed from child labor.  These activities will help to build networks of educators working on the special challenges of educating children removed from work. (3.3A
  • DOL will conduct program evaluations of the effectiveness, efficiency, and relevance of their child labor projects.  These evaluations will also address the sustainability of the impact of these projects and help draw valuable lessons learned. (3.3A)
  • In FY 2003, DOL’s technical cooperation program will place greater emphasis on supporting the Administration’s trade policy agenda.  This will be demonstrated in two ways: 1) by promoting appropriate consideration of core labor standards in each bilateral or multilateral trade agreement negotiated by the United States; and 2) by identifying needs and establish programs for technical assistance, as appropriate, to promote core labor standards in countries that benefit from U.S. trade preference programs.   DOL will work closely with the other main USG agencies involved in international trade policy--United States Trade Representative, and Departments of State, Commerce and Treasury--to carry out this new initiative. (3.3B)

Cross-Cutting Programs and Issues

DOL works closely with the International Labor Organization (ILO), American Embassies abroad, the Department of State, the Agency for International Development (USAID), the U.S. Trade Representative, and the Departments of Health and Human Services (HHS), Commerce, Treasury, and Education to assure that technical assistance in support of our program goals is strategically targeted at the most appropriate countries and to assure coordination and avoid duplication of effort.

On child labor issues, DOL works closely with the ILO’s International Program on the Elimination of Child Labor (IPEC) to develop projects to reduce the incidence of abusive child labor and develop educational opportunities for children.  In the development of certain projects, DOL works with U.S. and foreign industry and labor representatives and non-governmental organizations to ensure that programs are effective and credible. 

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