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Department of Labor Budget Overview FY 2002

Table of Contents

Total Budget

(Dollars in Billions)

  FY 2001 FY 2002 Change
Discretionary Programs: $11.9 $11.3 -$0.6
Mandatory Programs: $27.3 $33.1 $5.8
Total, Department of Labor $39.2 $44.4 $5.3
Full Time Equivalents 17,667 17,483 -184

Text Version


A 21st Century Department of Labor

Introduction

Hope is really what Secretary Chao would like the Department of Labor to be about — helping people reach their fullest potential in the greatest country on earth — by giving them the training and skills needed to succeed in a rapidly-changing world. The Department of Labor's Fiscal Year (FY) 2002 budget request was developed with just those outcomes in mind.

21st Century Pie Chart1

Text Version

The FY 2002 budget reflects the amounts necessary for continued efforts to meet the difficult challenges posed by a changing economy and American workforce. This budget maintains the Department's commitment that all workers have the opportunity to find and hold jobs under reasonable working conditions with good wages, reliable pensions, health benefits, and the opportunity to improve their skills in the 21st Century Workplace.

In response to this commitment, the total request for the Department in FY 2002 is $44.4 billion in budget authority and 17,483 full-time equivalents (FTE). The request for discretionary programs is $11.3 billion in budget authority, which is $564 million below the FY 2001 level.

21st Century Workforce

21st Century Pie Chart2

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With an eye toward the 21st Century Workforce, the Department's FY 2002 budget provides over $5 billion to support youth and adult training and employment activities. This is $5 billion worth of hope for a better future; a brighter tomorrow. To succeed in the 21st century, we must be prepared to adapt to changes in our economy — in how we work, where we work, and how we balance our professional and family lives. The Department of Labor cannot and must not simply react to changes. We must anticipate — thus enabling all workers to have as fulfilling and financially rewarding careers as they aspire to have.

21st Century Workforce Graph

Text Version

The Department will continue to use the Workforce Investment Act as the primary vehicle to guide our investment in America's workforce — but new ideas are needed, along with fresh approaches and new partnerships. Many jobs go unfilled because employers can't find workers with the necessary skills and training. Another challenge will be to make sure that an adequate workforce is available to meet the demands of a continually-growing economy. To face these challenges, the Department will create a new Office of the 21st Century Workforce to bring focus and solutions to the challenges that face America's workers. Later this Spring, the Department will convene a group of leaders from business, labor unions, and government to address the structural changes that are affecting the workforce and economy. The Office of the 21st Century Workforce will assist those Americans who have been left behind — such as those who have been laid-off from jobs due to technological changes or foreign competition.

Office of Disability Employment Policy

Office of Disabilities Employment Policy Chart

Text Version

The Administration is also committed to assisting those individuals who have been denied the right to a productive, meaningful work life because of a disability. The new Office of Disability Employment Policy will support key elements of the President's New Freedom Initiative, providing technology and other tools to disabled Americans so that they can better enter the economic mainstream. An additional $20.3 million and 10 FTE have been added in FY 2002 for this purpose. The 2002 budget also continues to fund work incentive grants — $20 million annually — to support effective, fully-accessible One-Stop Centers. It is not only important to give people with disabilities training and assistive technology — but also the hope and the ability to become more active citizens in their communities.

Worker Protection/Compliance Assistance

Worker Protections Program Chart

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Labor laws will be enforced — and workers will be protected. Businesses will be assisted in complying with the laws. And laws will be enforced using common sense — not just a reflexive, one-size-fits-all approach. The Department's 2002 budget maintains labor law enforcement agencies at FY 2001 levels. In addition, the Department will put more emphasis than ever before on prevention and compliance assistance — not just after-the-fact enforcement. The Department will continue to explore new ways to use technology as well as more traditional interventions to improve and expand the reach of its compliance assistance.

Redirected Resources

Budget Chart

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The Department's FY 2002 budget reallocates resources from lower-priority activities to areas where there are greater demonstrated needs. The Department's budget supports a sustained effort in core job training programs. Where training resources are redirected, State and local government communities will be able to continue to serve participants based upon the availability of funding already in the system.

In the area of International labor activities, the budget provides funding at FY 2000 levels, reflecting a continued commitment to the fundamentals of removing children from abusive and dangerous working environments. The FY 2002 budget also continues both multi-lateral assistance through the International Labor Organization (ILO) and bilateral assistance with the Department's agencies to assist developing countries as they implement and administer labor standards and social safety net programs. The budget also continues the Global HIV/AIDS Workplace initiative to provide multi-cultural assistance through ILO to support health education and HIV prevention in the workplace.

Labor Statistics

$25 million is requested for the Bureau of Labor Statistics, including an increase of $8.1 million and 40 FTE for a key step in fundamentally changing the manner in which the Consumer Price Index (CPI) is revised and updated. Historically, major revisions of the CPI were made every ten years. Beginning in FY 2002, expenditure weights in the CPI will be updated every two years -- the first step toward revising and updating the CPI on a continuous basis to improve the accuracy and timeliness of the index.

Information Technology

Information Technology Chart

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A total of $80 million — an increase of $43 million over FY 2001 — is requested for the centralized Information Technology (IT) account to fund the Department's IT investments within four crosscutting areas: $40.5 million for Enterprise Architecture; $10.6 million for a Common Office Automation Suite; $19.7 million for Security and Privacy; and $9.1 million for Common Administrative Systems.

With the establishment of the centralized IT investment fund, the Chief Information Officer (CIO) will ensure, through the IT Capital Investment Management process, accountability for the management of the Department's IT resources. The IT Capital Investment Management process and centralized IT investment fund provides the management tools necessary to implement the requirements outlined in the Clinger-Cohen Act, the Paperwork Reduction Act, the Government Paperwork Elimination Act, the Computer Security Act, and the Government Performance and Results Act. These investments will continue to enable the Department to implement sound IT investment strategies to eliminate interoperability and incompatibility issues and to improve overall mission-critical program effectiveness.

Federal Employees' Compensation Act

Administrative Surcharge

In FY 2002, the budget proposes to add an administrative surcharge to the amount billed to other Federal agencies for workers' compensation benefits. The Secretary of Labor will use this surcharge to finance the Department's administrative expenses in the Employment Standards Administration for the Federal Workers' Compensation program, including the cost related to management, operations, and legal support. The program surcharge provides $80 million in offsetting collections for budget authority for this program. Most importantly, the surcharge will boost the incentive of Federal agencies to improve the safety of their workplaces, resulting in fewer injuries and compensation costs.

Presidential Management Reforms

Improving Programs, Systems, and Procedures

The Department is committed to working with the Office of Inspector General, the General Accounting Office, and the Office of Management and Budget to improve management of its programs, systems, and procedures. In particular, the Department will focus efforts on protecting worker benefits funds, reforming the Alien Labor Certification Program, expanding the reach of compliance assistance programs, and strengthening financial management of grant programs.

Mandantory Programs Chart

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Agency-Specific Reforms

Protection of Worker Benefits

The Department recognizes that all major programs are vulnerable to some degree of fraud — particularly in Unemployment Insurance, Black Lung Benefits, and the Federal Employees' Compensation Act programs. The Department will continue its diligence in training State staff in fraud detection techniques and encourage the sharing of enforcement strategies. With respect to the workers' compensation programs, current cost containment efforts — including periodic review of long-term cases and more sophisticated reviews of medical claims — are beginning to show significant progress.

Foreign Labor Certification Reform

The Department will begin implementation of the streamlined application and adjudication process for the permanent labor certification applications. Changes to the program include establishing an employer attestation process, eliminating State processing, centralizing Federal processing, and establishing an audit function.

Program Accountability of Grants

The budget provides a total of $1.8 million in FY 2002 to accelerate efforts to modernize grants management and accountability systems to improve overall administration of funds. The Employment and Training Administration request includes $1.5 million to improve grants monitoring and technical assistance by providing oversight, assistance, and programming support for grantees. Also, emphasis will be placed on developing analytical tools and specified reports and linkages with the Department's centralized accounting system. The Office of the Chief Financial Officer will use the balance of these funds to oversee developmental efforts and to ensure overall compliance with the Federal Financial Management and Improvement Act.

Summary

The Department of Labor will be prepared for the 21st Century Workforce. The Department's first responsibility will be to protect workers by enforcing and promoting compliance with our nation's labor laws:

  • to ensure the safety of every workplace;
  • to guarantee an honest day's pay for an honest day's work;
  • to stop discrimination;
  • to protect workers from coercion and intimidation;
  • to protect every worker's pension; and
  • to provide youth and adult training opportunities for a better tomorrow.

No worker can be left behind. And no worker can be without hope. The 21st Century Department of Labor.


EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION OVERVIEW

Budget Authority
(Dollars in Millions)

FY 2001 FY 2002 Change
Employment and Training:
Training and Employment Services 1/ $5,849.8 $5,341.9 $-507.9
Comm. Ser. Employ. for Older Amer. 440.2 440.2 0.0
Employment Service/One Stop 1,016.4 1,000.4 -16.0
Gifts and Bequests 0.2 0.2 0.0
Welfare-To-Work Jobs -50.0 0.0 50.0
Subtotal, Employment & Training 7,256.6 6,782.7 -473.9
Income Maintenance:
Unemployment Insurance Program 2/ 2,348.9 2,413.9 65.0
Federal Unemployment Benefits (FUBA) 3/ 406.6 415.7 9.1
Advances to UTF and Other Funds 4/ 471.0 464.0 -7.0
Unemployment Trust Fund Benefits 25,543.5 28,442.8 2,899.3
Subtotal, Income Maintenance 28,299.0 31,272.4 2,973.4
Program Administration 158.9 161.1 2.2
Total ETA Budget Authority $35,714.5 $38,216.2 $2,501.7
Full Time Equivalents (includes reimbursable staff) 1,388 1,353 -35

Text Version

1/ Includes mandatory H1-B fee funding ($179.9 million in FY 2001 and $213.4 million in FY 2002) for use in demonstration projects.
2/ FY 2001 does not include $14.8 million for contingency funds as a result of a projected workload increase (AWIU trigger)
3/ Assumes enactment of legislation extending authorization of Trade Adjustment Assistance and NAFTA transitional adjustment assistance.
4/ Non-add item, see Black Lung Disability Trust Fund (BLDTF).

The total FY 2002 budget request for the Employment and Training Administration (ETA) is designed to provide a prepared workforce to help Americans get the education and training, and employment services that will enable them to obtain good jobs at decent wages, and to provide temporary support for those who have lost their job through no fault of their own.

In total, funds for ETA in FY 2002 will increase by a net of $2.502 billion over FY 2001. In Income Maintenance, there is an increase of approximately $2.973 billion due primarily to increases in unemployment benefit payments resulting from higher benefit levels and an increased number of claimants related to projected higher unemployment. In the Employment and Training Programs area, there is a net decrease of $474 million, largely due to the decreases in formula grant programs related to the availability of large amounts of unexpended State carryover which can be used in lieu of new budget authority to maintain service levels.

EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING PROGRAMS

Budget Authority
(Dollars in Millions)
  FY 2001 FY 2002 Change
Youth Programs $2,872.1 $2,650.1 $-222.0
Youth Activities 1/ 1,148.0 1,001.0 -147.0
Youth Opportunity Grants 1/ 250.0 250.0 0.0
Job Corps 1,399.1 1,399.1 0.0
Respon. Reintegration for Young Offenders 2/ 75.0 0.0 -75.0
Adult Programs 2,540.0 2,283.0 -257.0
Dislocated Worker Employment and Training Activities 1,590.0 1,383.0 -207.0
Adult Employment and Training Activities 950.0 900.0 -50.0
Other Employment and Training 1,844.5 1,849.6 5.1
One Stop Centers 150.0 134.0 -16.0
Grants to States for Reemployment Services 35.0 35.0 0.0
Employment Service 811.4 811.4 0.0
Work Incentive Grants 20.0 20.0 0.0
WIA National Programs 1/ 2/ 437.7 408.8 -28.9
Welfare-to-Work 3/ -50.0 0.0 50.0
Community Service Employment for Older Americans 440.2 440.2 0.0
Gifts and Bequests 0.2 0.2 0.0
Total Budget Authority 4/ $7,256.6 $6,782.7 $-473.9

Text Version


1/ Reflects reprogramming of $25 million from Youth Opportunity Grants and $20 million from Safe Schools/Healthy Students to Youth Activities in FY 2001.
2/ Reflects reprogramming of $20 million from Incumbent Workers to Responsible Reintegration for Young Offenders in FY 2001.
3/ Mandatory funding.


The Fiscal Year (FY) 2002 budget request for Employment and Training Programs proposes a net decrease of $474 million to $6.783 billion. This change is largely due to decreases of $359 million in formula grant programs related to the availability of large amounts of State unexpended carryover which can be used in lieu of new budget authority to maintain service levels. It is currently estimated that about $1.6 billion in unexpended youth, adult, and dislocated worker funds will be carried into 2002. Normally, the amount of unexpended funds would be about 20 percent of availability, or about $1 billion. In addition, bill language is requested reclassifying the budget authority for the $2.463 billion advance appropriation provided in the FY 2001 appropriation for obligation in FY 2002 as mandatory funding. This will avoid overstating discretionary budget authority in FY 2002, and reverse the practice of using advance appropriations to avoid discretionary spending limitations.

The Employment and Training Administration is part of a nationwide partnership among Federal, State and local governments, the private sector, labor organizations, educational institutions, and community and faith-based organizations providing a full range of workforce development services. This partnership, known as America's Workforce Network (AWN), provides information and services to help employers find qualified workers and to help people manage their careers. The AWN partners have come together to streamline WIA and other services through One Stop Centers.

Youth

A total of $2.650 billion is requested for employment and training programs for Youth for investments that help young people make a successful transition to the world of work and family responsibility. This is a net decrease of $222 million below the FY 2001 budget authority level provided. The Youth Activities decrease in FY 2002 can be accommodated without affecting service levels due to the availability of large amounts of State unexpended carryover which can be used in lieu of new budget authority. In FY 2002, the Department will administer three programs to address youth problems: Workforce Investment Act (WIA) Youth Activities, Youth Opportunity Grants, and Job Corps. In addition, the Responsible Reintegration for Young Offenders program that was begun in FY 2001 will be continued as a two year effort with $55 million in budget authority provided in that year supplemented by an additional $20 million reprogrammed from the new Incumbent Worker program, which will not be undertaken in FY 2001.

For Youth Activities under Section 126 of WIA, a total of $1.001 billion is requested, a decrease of $147 million below the FY 2001 appropriation. In FY 2001, $25 million from Youth Opportunity Grants and $20 million from the new Safe Schools/Healthy Students program, which will not be undertaken, will be reprogrammed to Youth Activities, thereby providing a total budget authority level of $1.148 billion in that year. Safe Schools/Healthy Students is a targeted job training program whose participants can be served under the core Youth Activities program, where local decision making can make best use of these resources. Youth Opportunity Grants will continue in 36 communities that received awards last year, while providing additional Youth Activities resources to help States and local areas as they continue to make the transition to the requirements of the WIA. This program supports a wide range of activities and services to prepare low-income youth for academic and employment success, including summer jobs. It also provides increased flexibility to local Youth Councils, enabling them to develop pathways for career opportunities. In so doing, Youth Councils will link businesses and schools to ensure that work preparation activities are more relevant. The budget authority requested, together with unexpended carryover, will support 721,100 participants, the same level anticipated for FY 2001. Of the 19-21 year old youth registered under this program, 77 percent will be employed in the third quarter after program exit.

The FY 2002 budget includes $250 million for Youth Opportunity Grants, the same level as in FY 2001. In FY 2001, $25 million will be reprogrammed to Youth Activities, thereby providing a budget authority level of $250 million in that year for this program. This program is intended to provide comprehensive, longer term intervention in the lives of primarily out-of-school youth living in inner cities and high poverty areas to help them graduate from high school, get jobs, and progress in the workforce. Included in the request is $20 million for the Rewarding Youth Achievement Program which will provide economically disadvantaged youth in high poverty areas with extended summer employment opportunities and the opportunity to earn an end of summer bonus as a reward for academic achievement. Also included is

$10 million for Migrant Youth activities to provide employment and training assistance to youth in families engaged in migrant and seasonal farm work. In total, the requested amount for Youth Opportunity Grants will serve an estimated 58,100 youth, the same level anticipated for FY 2001. By 2002, 53 percent of participants in this program placed in employment, the military, advanced training, post-secondary education, or apprenticeships will be retained at six months.

The Job Corps will provide intensive skill training, academic and social education, and support to an estimated 73,000 participants at 121 centers in FY 2002. The budget request is $1.399 billion, the same level as FY 2001. For FY 2002, 88.5 percent of the program's graduates will get jobs or be enrolled in education with entry average hourly wages of $7.90, and 70 percent will continue to be employed or enrolled in education six months after their initial placement date.

Although no new 2002 budget authority is requested for the new Responsible Reintegration for Young Offenders program, funding of $55 million, together with $20 million reprogrammed from the new Incumbent Worker program, will be used to provide $75 million in two year grants to address youth offender issues. The Incumbent Worker program represents a targeted job training effort whose participants can be served under core employment and training programs, where local decision making can make best use of these resources. The Responsible Reintegration for Young Offenders program will build on work begun earlier using FY 2000 and FY 1998 demonstration funds. Building on lessons learned through these smaller pilot projects, this large scale initiative will link youthful offenders under age 35 with essential services that can help make the difference in their choices in the future, such as education, training, job placement, drug counseling, and mentoring, in order to reintegrate them into the mainstream economy. Through local competitive grants, this program would establish partnerships between the criminal justice system and local workforce investment systems, complementing a similar program in the Department of Justice (DOJ). To maximize the impact of these initiatives, the DOL and DOJ funds will be targeted to the same communities and populations. An estimated 9,400 youth will be served in FY 2001 and in FY 2002. For FY 2002, an estimated 65 percent of program graduates will get jobs, reenroll in high school, or be enrolled in post-secondary education or training.

Adults

A total of $2.283 billion is requested for employment and training programs for Adults, including Dislocated Worker Employment and Training Activities, and Adult Employment and Training Activities. This is a decrease of $257 million below FY 2001, which can be accommodated without affecting service levels due to the availability of large amounts of unexpended carryover.

Dislocated Worker Employment and Training Activities under authority of WIA, provides State formula grants, as well as a national emergency grant account, for retraining and adjustment services to laid off workers with a labor market attachment to help them quickly return to work. The FY 2002 request of $1.383 billion for this program reflects a decrease of $207 million. The budget authority requested, together with State unexpended carryover, will support 927,000 participants, the same level anticipated for FY 2001. This is possible despite the program decrease due to the availability of large amounts of unexpended carryover which can be used in lieu of new budget authority. Among the workers assisted by the program are those displaced by trade, technology, defense downsizing, and other causes. For FY 2002,

75 percent of those registered under this program will be employed in the first quarter after program exit, and 85 percent will be employed in the third quarter after program exit with total post-program earnings in the second and third quarter after exit of 92 percent of pre-dislocation earnings.

Adult Employment and Training Activities provide formula grants to States under authority of WIA for employment and training assistance to low-income adults. The FY 2002 request of $900 million for this program reflects a decrease of $50 million. The budget authority requested, together with unexpended carryover, will support 396,000 participants, the same level anticipated for FY 2001. This is possible despite the program decrease due to the availability of large amounts of unexpended carryover which can be used in lieu of new budget authority. The WIA adult program offers universal access to core services for job seekers and adults trying to advance their careers, with more intensive services and training being targeted to those most in need, including welfare recipients. For FY 2002, of those registered under this program, 80 percent will be employed in the third quarter after program exit, with an average earnings change of $3,423.

Other Employment and Training

The FY 2002 budget includes $1.850 billion for Other Employment and Training Programs, a net increase of $5.1 million above FY 2001. These programs include One Stop Centers, Grants to States for Reemployment Services, the Employment Service, Work Incentive Grants to assist the disabled in finding employment, WIA National Programs, Welfare-to-Work, and Community Service Employment for Older Americans.

The FY 2002 budget includes $134 million to provide employment and related information through One Stop Centers and its America's Labor Market Information System (ALMIS), a decrease of $16 million below FY 2001. Services include America's Job Bank that lists about 1.5 million jobs, and America's Talent Bank that lists over 500,000 resumes. Information on occupational and career-related items can be obtained from America's Career InfoNet, and America's Learning Exchange provides access to lifelong learning opportunities. Efforts to improve access to One Stop information and services include a toll-free number for easier access to information on services and locations, and enhanced technology for serving individuals with disabilities.

Also included is $35 million for Reemployment Services Grants. This program, which began in FY 2001, provides grants through the Employment Service for targeted, staff-assisted services to unemployment insurance claimants identified as having a high probability of exhausting their benefits. This will speed their reentry into employment and reduce benefit duration and cost.

The Employment Service (ES) provides a vast array of information and services to American workers and employers. ES is the essential labor market infrastructure for the One Stop System. In FY 2002, a total of $811.4 million is requested, the same level provided for FY 2001. Included in this total in FY 2001 is a level of $761.7 million for Allotments to States and $49.7 million for ES National Programs. ES provides no-fee services to individuals seeking employment and to employers seeking workers. The request is expected to result in 5.8 million "entering employment" placements.

In FY 2002, the budget includes $20 million for Work Incentive Grants, the same level provided in FY 2001, to enhance the prospects of employment for individuals with disabilities. This effort is undertaken in conjunction with the budget's proposed increase for the Office of Disability Employment Policy. This program will provide competitive grants to partnerships or consortia in States to provide incentives for broader systems building efforts involving coordinated service delivery through, and linkages across, the One Stop Center system. In addition, these grants would augment the capacity of the One Stop Centers system for the delivery of a full array of effective employment and training services to people with disabilities. Likewise, this effort will promote coordination among members of such partnerships or consortia, in order to ensure that people with disabilities are better prepared to enter, reenter, and remain in the workforce. For FY 2002, the program will increase by 5 percent the number of people with disabilities served and increase by 2 percentage points the rate of unsubsidized employment in the local Workforce Investment Area.

The FY 2002 budget for WIA National Programs is $408.8 million in FY 2002, a net decrease of $28.9 million below FY 2001. These programs include the provision of employment and training assistance to Native Americans and migrant and seasonal farm workers; as well as pilots, demonstrations, and research; evaluation; technical assistance and incentive grants in support of the employment and training system; the National Skills Standards Board; and Women in Apprenticeship. Also included is mandatory funding for a demonstration program of grants to regional and local entities to provide technical skills training for unemployed and incumbent workers supported by fees paid by employers applying for foreign workers under the H-1B temporary foreign labor certification program. This program is authorized by the American Competitiveness and Workforce Improvement Act of 1998.

Changes for FY 2002 include an increase of $33.6 million in the H-1B program and a decrease of $62.4 million for unnecessary Pilot, Demonstration, and Research earmarks in the FY 2001 appropriation.

In FY 2002, $440.2 million is requested for the Community Service Employment for Older Americans program, the same level provided in FY 2001. The request will continue support of the participant level of 92,000.

The Welfare-to-Work program, authorized by the Balanced Budget Act of 1997, is designed to help States and cities move the hardest to employ welfare recipients into lasting, unsubsidized jobs. States and cities can use these funds to provide subsidies and other incentives to private business. Although no funding is requested in FY 2002, the FY 2001 appropriation act gave States two additional years to spend the funds. Thus, spending from the $3 billion in mandatory funding appropriated in FY 1998 and FY 1999 will continue to provide job placement and job creation. For FY 2002, of those Welfare to Work participants placed in unsubsidized employment, 67 percent will remain in the workforce for six month (2 consec- utive quarters following placement) with 7 percent average earnings increase by the second consecutive quarter following placement.

Employment and Training Selected Workload Data 1/

(Participants in Thousands)

  FY 2001 FY 2002 Change
Youth Activities 721 721 0
Youth Opportunity Grants 58 58 0
Job Corps 72 73 1
Res. Reinteg. for Young Offenders 2/ 9 9 0
Adult Employ. and Training Acts. 396 396 0
Dislocated Workers Employment
and Training Activities
927 927 0
Native Americans 22 22 0
Migrants and Seasonal Farmworkers 41 41 0
Community Services Employment/
Older Americans
92 92 0
Total 2,338 2,339 1

Text Version

1/ Reflects FY 2001 reprogramming
2/ Reflects participants funded from FY 2001 budget authority augmented by a reprogramming to operate a two year program.


INCOME MAINTENANCE

Budget Authority
(Dollars in Millions)
  FY 2001 FY 2002 Change
Unemployment Insurance Program 1/ $2,348.9 $2,413.9 $65.0
Fed. Unemployment Benefits & Allow 2/ 406.6 415.7 9.1
Advances to UTF and Other Funds 3/ 471.0 464.0 -7.0
Unemployment Trust Fund Benefits 25,543.5 28,442.8 2,899.3
Total, Income Maintenance $28,299.0 $31,272.4 $2,973.4

Text Version

1/ FY 2001 does not include $14.8 million for contingency funds as a result of a projected workload increase (AWIU trigger)
2/ Legislation will be proposed to extend the TAA and NAFTA TAA programs which expire on September 30, 2001.
3/ Non-add, see Black Lung Disability Trust Fund (BLDTF) section.


The FY 2002 request for Income Maintenance includes $30.9 billion for the Unemployment Trust Fund. Of the FY 2002 Income Maintenance total, $2.4 billion is the discretionary amount requested for State administration of the Unemployment Insurance (UI) Program. In addition, $415.7 million is being requested for the Federal Unemployment Benefits and Allowances (FUBA) account. Legislation will be proposed to extend the Trade Adjustment Assistance and NAFTA Transitional Adjustment Assistance programs financed in FUBA. The FY 2002 request for Advances to the UTF and Other Funds (Advances) account is $464.0 million, which is for the Black Lung Disability Trust Fund .

The balance of Income Maintenance includes State unemployment benefit payments to claimants, and Federal agency reimbursements for benefits paid to former Federal employees and ex-service members, and Payments to the Unemployment Trust Fund, which provides for administrative costs related to extended benefits.

Unemployment Insurance Program

Under the State Unemployment Insurance and Employment Service Operations (SUIESO) account, funds are provided to the States for the administration of the Unemployment Insurance and Employment Service (ES) programs. The ES program is discussed in the Employment and Training Programs section of this publication. For UI, the FY 2002 budget includes a request for $2.4 billion, which is $65 million above the FY 2001 appropriation. The $65 million increase in FY 2002 reflects changes in claims workload under the economic assumptions. The average weekly insured unemployment (AWIU) is projected to increase to 2.622 million from the 2.396 million level set in the FY 2001 appropriation. The contingency trigger mechanism in the 2001 appropriation is expected to release an additional $14.8 million in 2001 to cover increasing claims workload.

The Administration plans to examine the unemployment compensation program carefully over the coming months. The FY 2002 funding level requested for the UI program will provide for approximately 46,000 staff years of service. State staff will handle 6.8 million employer tax accounts, 19.9 million initial unemployment claims, and a total of 136.4 million weeks claimed and 1.0 million appeals. In addition, to pay for any workload increase over an AWIU rate of 2.622 million, $28.6 million shall be available for every 100,000 increase over the AWIU, with a pro rata amount for any increase less than 100,000. This unemployment insurance request also includes $10 million for National Activities, which are interstate or multi-state in nature.

Federal Unemployment Benefits and Allowances (FUBA)

This appropriation covers payments of weekly trade readjustment allowances, training, job search and relocation costs of workers adversely affected by increased imports. In addition, this request provides for similar benefits to workers affected by trade with countries covered by the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA).

For FY 2002, $415.7 million is requested for FUBA. Legislation will be proposed at a later date to extend the TAA and NAFTA-Transitional Adjustment Assistance programs which expire September 30, 2001.

Advances to the Unemployment Trust Fund and Other Funds

This appropriation provides general fund advances to several trust and general fund accounts. In FY 2002, the requested amount includes $464.0 million which will provide for advances to the Black Lung Disability Trust Fund (BLDTF) account administered by the Employment Standards Administration, and which is repayable with interest to the General Fund in Treasury.

Unemployment Trust Fund

The Unemployment Trust Fund includes amounts for both the administration of Federal and State unemployment compensation, and for Federal and State unemployment compensation benefits which provide income support to those temporarily out of work while they search for employment. This budget proposal is based on estimates that the insured unemployment rate for FY 2002 will be 2.0 percent. This translates to an average of approximately 2.6 million beneficiaries per week receiving unemployment assistance under Federal and State programs in FY 2002. Average weekly benefits are estimated at $232.0 million in FY 2002, while the average number of weeks of benefits per recipient is expected to be 14.4 weeks. The total amount paid for unemployment compensation benefits and allowances is estimated at $28.5 billion. In FY 2002, estimated total unemployment trust fund outlays for benefits and administrative costs will increase from $25.6 billion to $28.4 billion primarily due to an increase in the number of the insured unemployed and an increase in the average weekly benefit amount. Trust fund revenues earmarked for State benefits, together with State fund reserves are estimated to be sufficient to cover needed benefit payments by States. In addition, there will be special distribution of $100 million in Federal tax funds to the States (Reed Act distribution), for administering the Unemployment Insurance Program.

Income Maintenance Selected Workload Data
(In thousands)
  FY 2001 FY 2002 Change
Basic Workload (in thousands)
Initial Claims 18,953 19,897 944
Weeks Claimed 127,285 136,364 9,079
Appeals 998 997 -1
Wage Records 607,340 611,800 4,460
Employer Tax Accounts 6,767 6,815 48
Covered Employment 127,900 128,800 900
Eligibility Interviews 9,520 10,551 1,031

Text Version

ETA PROGRAM ADMINISTRATION



Budget Authority/Trust Fund Transfers
(Dollars in Millions)
  FY 2001 FY 2002 Change
Adult Services $35.7 $36.9 $1.2
Youth Services 37.0 37.6 0.6
Workforce Security 49.4 50.0 0.6
Apprenticeship Training, Employer and Labor Services 21.1 21.4 0.3
Executive Direction 9.3 9.3 0.0
Welfare to Work 6.4 5.9 -0.5
Total, Budget Authority $158.9 $161.1 $2.2
Full Time Equivalent Staff 1/ 1,388 1,353 -35

Text Version


1/ FY 2001 includes 25 FTE funded through H1B fees and 3 reimbursable FTE. In FY 2002, 50 FTE are funded through H1B fees and 3 reimbursable FTE.


The Program Administration account provides for Federal administration of all employment and training programs. These programs include those authorized by the following legislation: Workforce Investment Act (WIA) of 1998; the Older Americans Act of 1965, as amended; the School to Work Opportunities Act, expiring October 1, 2001; the Trade Act of 1974, as amended; the National Apprenticeship Act of 1937; Title III of the Social Security Act of 1935, as amended; the Wagner-Peyser Act of 1933, as amended; and Title 4 of the Social Security Act, as amended (Welfare to Work).

The FY 2002 request for Program Administration provides funds for 1,353, full-time equivalent (FTE) staff and $161.1 million. This number includes 1,300 FTE financed from direct appropriations, 3 FTE from reimbursements, and 50 FTE funded from H-1B fee allocations. This request represents a decrease of 60 direct FTE from the FY 2001 appropriation, and an increase of 25 FTE from 25 to 50 for the administrative costs of processing H-1B applications and the processing of certifications for the permanent foreign labor certification program. The reduction of directly appropriated staff will be accomplished through a variety of measures, including the elimination of management positions as necessary, the consolidation of functions, reduced workloads and other streamlining actions.

Additionally, an increase of $1.5 million is requested for procuring contractor services to provide specialized financial and program performance management information to all level of ETA organizations. This request includes an increase of $715 thousand for the increased space costs of the San Francisco regional office and $5.1 million for built-in cost increases, which will be absorbed.

Adult Services

Funding provides staff for leadership, policy direction, and administration for a decentralized system of grants to States and localities for job training and employment assistance for disadvantaged and low income adults and dislocated workers; provides for training and employment services to special targeted groups; provides for the settlement of trade adjustment assistance petitions; and includes related program administration activities. The FY 2002 request for this activity includes an increase of $375 thousand for improved financial and performance accountability and a decrease of $495 thousand and 5 FTE for the consolidation and streamlining of functions.

Youth Services

Funding provides staff for leadership, policy direction, and administration for a decentralized system of grants to States for job training and employment assistance for youth programs, including the Youth Opportunity Grants program, and the Job Corps and includes related program administration activities. The FY 2002 request for this activity includes an increase of $375 thousand for improved financial and performance accountability and a decrease of $1.2 million and 13 FTE for consolidation and streamlining of activities in the Youth office and Job Corps.

Workforce Security

Funding provides staff for leadership and policy direction for the administration of the comprehensive nationwide public employment service system; unemployment insurance programs in each State; and for a One Stop Center system, including a comprehensive system of collecting, analyzing, and dissemination of labor market information; and includes related programs operations support activities. The FY 2002 request for this activity includes an increase of $375 thousand for improved financial and performance accountability and a decrease of $1.6 million and 15 FTE for consolidation and streamlining of functions.

Apprenticeship Training, Employer and Labor Services

Funding promotes and provides leadership and policy direction for the administration of apprenticeship as a method of skill acquisition through a Federal-State apprenticeship structure. Employer and labor services will facilitate the understanding and responsiveness of workforce development systems to the training needs of employers and the interest of labor organizations in training programs. The FY 2002 request for this activity includes an increase of $375 thousand for improved financial and performance accountability and a decrease of $856 thousand and 10 FTE for consolidation and streamlining of activities.

Executive Direction

Funding promotes and provides leadership and policy direction for all training and employment service programs and activities and provides for related program operations support, including research, evaluations, demonstrations, and performance standards. The FY 2002 request for this activity includes a decrease of $266 thousand and 2 FTE for consolidation and streamlining of activities.

Welfare-to-Work

Funding provides leadership, policy direction, technical assistance, and administration for formula grants to States and competitive grants to local entities to assist long term, hard to employ welfare recipients secure lasting unsubsidized employment. The FY 2002 request for this activity includes a decrease of $725 thousand and 15 FTE due to declining workloads.

PENSION AND WELFARE BENEFITS ADMINISTRATION

Budget Authority
(Dollars in Millions)
FY 2001 FY 2002 Change
Enforcement and Compliance $83.5 $84.6 $1.2
Policy, Regulations, and Public Service 20.2 19.2 -1.0
Executive Direction 4.0 4.1 0.1
Total, Budget Authority $107.6 $108.0 $0.4
Full Time Equivalents 850 837 -13

Text Version

The Pension and Welfare Benefits Administration (PWBA) is responsible for the administration and enforcement of Title I of the Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974 (ERISA) and the Federal Employees' Retirement System Act of 1986 (FERSA). The primary mission of PWBA is to protect the pension, health and other benefits of participants in private sector employee benefit plans. PWBA directly affects the livelihood of over 150 million people who participate in ERISA-covered plans, and protects the U.S. economy's single largest source of capital for investment--pension funds. Currently, there are over 95 million participants, including workers and retirees, in private pension plans alone which hold nearly $5 trillion in assets. In FY 2002, PWBA anticipates increasing the number of cases closed with violations corrected by 2.5 percent, generating approximately $400 million in prohibited transactions corrected and plan assets corrected or protected. In addition, PWBA will recover more benefits through customer assistance - an estimated $67 million in 2002, a 2 percent increase over FY 2001's goal. In addition, PWBA will continue to aggressively educate the public about the need to save for retirement as well as how to protect their retirement benefits. As a result of this education and the growing workforce, PWBA anticipates a continued growth of approximately 1 percent in the number of employees covered by pension plans. Finally, PWBA continues to reap dividends from simplifying the annual report (the Form 5500) filed by companies that sponsor pensions which allows PWBA to more readily protect pensions and to keep participants better informed about their pension assets.

Enforcement and Compliance

This activity conducts criminal and civil investigations, performs reviews to ensure compliance with the fiduciary provisions of ERISA and FERSA, and assures compliance with applicable reporting requirements, as well as accounting, auditing and actuarial standards. Provides compliance assistance to businesses and to the public. The 2002 estimates include expanded protection of benefit plan assets in instances where participants are unable to obtain their earned benefits because fiduciaries have deserted the plan and effectively abdicated their responsibilities. In FY 2002, the budget request for this activity is $84.6 million and 676 FTE.

Policy, Regulation and Public Services

This activity conducts policy, research and legislative analyses on pension, health and other employee benefit issues; promulgates regulations and interpretations regarding reporting and disclosure, fiduciary, and coverage provisions; issues individual and class exemptions from ERISA's and FERSA's prohibited transactions provisions; discloses legally-required reports; provides technical assistance to plan officials, employee benefits practitioners, and the public; provides direct assistance to plan participants and beneficiaries in enforcing their rights under ERISA and in obtaining benefits under employee benefit plans; provides assistance in response to requests from members of Congress (including constituent requests), as well as technical assistance to about a dozen legislative committees with jurisdiction affecting ERISA and FERSA. In FY 2002, the budget request for this activity totals $19.2 million and 139 FTE.

Program Oversight

This activity provides leadership, policy direction, strategic planning, and management of the pension and welfare benefits program. Oversight and operational guidance is provided in the areas of financial management, budget formulation and execution, debt management, human resource management, labor and employee relations, employee development and other administrative activities. In addition, this activity conducts a comprehensive technical training program in support of enforcement, policy, legislative, and regulatory functions. In FY 2002, the budget request for this activity totals $4.1 million and 22 FTE.

PWBA Selected Workload Data
  FY 2001 FY 2002 Change
Plan reviews and investigations conducted 6,954 6,575 -379
Investigations closed restoring or protecting assets 2,065 2,117 52
Exemptions, determinations, interpretations and regulations issued

1,172

1,184



12
Inquiries received * 160,347 196,370 36,023

Text Version


* Represents total number of inquiries received by customer service staff in the National and Field Offices. Excludes calls handled by automated telephone systems that provide responses to frequently asked ERISA questions.

PENSION BENEFIT GUARANTY CORPORATION

Budget Authority/Trust Fund Transfers
(Dollars in Millions)
  FY 2001 FY 2002 Change
Single Employer Program Benefit Pmts. $1,109.8 $1,079.0 $-30.8
Multi-Employer Program Financial Asst. 6.3 6.3 0.0
Administrative Expenses 11.7 11.7 0.0
Services related to terminations 179.0 178.2 -0.8
Total, Budget Authority $1,306.8 $1,275.2 $-31.6
Full Time Equivalents 754 754 0

Text Version

The Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation (PBGC) is a Government Corporation, administered by a board of directors chaired by the Secretary of Labor, which guarantees the payments of pension plan benefits to participants in the event that covered plans fail or go out of existence. PBGC protects the pension benefits of about 43 million workers and retirees who earn traditional pensions.

Single Employer Program Benefit Payments

Monthly pension payments are made to plan participants and other beneficiaries of plans which have been trusteed by PBGC.

Multi-Employer Program Financial Assistance

Financial assistance provides for repayable loans to insolvent multi-employer sponsored plans to enable these plans to continue paying benefits if a series of prescribed steps is taken to place the plan on a sound financial basis.

Administrative Expenses

Administrative expenses, subject to limitation by appropriation, provide for: collection of more than $800 million in premiums; accounting and auditing services; asset management; executive direction; and other support functions.

Services Related to Terminations

The services related to terminations provides for PBGC's costs attributable to trusteed pension plans and benefit payment service where plans fail (such as in bankruptcy).

PBGC Selected Workload Data
  FY 2001 FY 2002 Change
Plans Terminated: Insufficient Assets 116 128 12
Participants in Govern. Trusteeships 647,500 687,500 40,000
Government Trusteeships at EOY 2,956 3,084 128

Text Version

EMPLOYMENT STANDARDS ADMINISTRATION

Budget Authority
(Dollars in Millions)
  FY 2001 FY 2002 Change
Staffing
Salaries and Expenses 1/ $406.1 331.4 -74.7
S&E, FECA Surcharge 2/ 0.0 80.3 80.3
Special Benefits, Fair Share 3/ 34.9 36.7 1.8
Energy Employees' Occupational Illness
Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA) 4/
$50.3 $136.0 $85.7
Total, Staffing $491.3 $584.4 $93.1
Income Maintenance (Mandatory) 0.0
Special Benefits 56.0 121.0 65.0
Energy Employees' Occupational Illness

Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA)



358.0


597.0


239.0
Black Lung Disability Trust Fund 1,027.9 1,036.0 8.1
Transfer From BLDTF -52.6 -54.7 -2.1
Offsetting Receipts - BLDTF -2.0 -2.0 0.0
Panama Canal Commission Fund 7.5 7.4 -0.1
Offsetting Receipts - PCC -7.5 -7.4 0.1
Special Workers' Compensation 153.0 151.0 -2.0
Transfer From SWC -2.0 -2.0 0.0
Total, Income Maintenance 1,538.3 1,846.3 308.0
Total, ESA Program 5/ $2,029.6 $2,430.7 $401.1
Full Time Equivalents 4,334 4,404 70

Text Version

1/ Includes $13.1 million in FY 2001 and $15.5 million in FY 2002 in H-1B fee revenue.
2/ Reflects a new proposal to finance the Federal Employees' Compensation Act (FECA) program through the agencies beginning in FY 2002.
3/ Estimates include 133 FTE financed in FY 2002 in the Special Benefits account, using "fair share" funds.
4/ At the time the President's Budget went to press, the final structure and Executive Branch placement of the Energy Employees' Occupational Illness Compensation program had not yet been determined.
5/ Excludes certain BLDTF Administrative expenses (see Departmental Management and Office of Inspector General sections in this package).


In total, funds for the Employment Standards Administration (ESA) in FY 2002 will increase by $401.1 million or about 20 percent compared with FY 2001. Most of this increase is for the new Energy Employees' Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act entitlement program to provide compensation to certain workers (or their families) for illnesses related to their exposure to beryllium, radiation, or silica in the Department of Energy's nuclear weapons complex. The rest of these increases in FY 2002 are for other entitlement programs such as workers' compensation and Black Lung disability programs.

ESA STAFFING

Budget Authority/Trust Fund Transfers(Dollars in Millions)
  FY 2001 FY 2002 Change
Enforcement of Wage and Hour Standards 1/ $165.4 $168.1 $2.7
Fed. Contractor EEO Standards Enforcement 76.2 76.3 0.1
Federal Programs for Workers' Compensation 120.6 42.9 -77.7
Program Direction and Support 13.4 13.5 0.1
Labor-Management Standards 30.5 30.6 0.1
Total, Budget Authority, S&E $406.1 $331.4 $-74.7
S&E, FECA Surcharge 2/ 0.0 80.3 80.3
Special Benefits, Fair Share 34.9 36.7 1.8
Energy Employees' Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA) 3/ 50.3 136.0 85.7
Total Staffing $491.3 $584.4 $93.1
Full Time Equivalents 4,334 4,404 70

Text Version

1/ Includes H-1B Fees of $13.1 million in FY 2001 and $15.5 million in FY 2002.
2/ Reflects proposal in the FY 2002 budget to assign the full cost of administration of the Federal Employees' Compensation Act program to the Federal agencies based on their employees' workers' compensation benefits.
3/ New entitlement program established in FY 2001.

The budget request to conduct these programs in FY 2002 is for $584.4 million and 4,404 FTE, of which $331.4 million and 3,013 FTE is in the Salaries and Expenses account, $80.3 million and 845 FTE is to be financed by the FECA Surcharge, $36.7 million and 133 FTE is in the Fair Share portion of the Special Benefits account, and 413 FTE and $136 million is in the Energy Employees' Occupational Illness Compensation Act program. In total, this is an increase for staffing of $93.1 million and 70 FTE over FY 2001.

Wage and Hour Standards

The FY 2002 budget request for the Wage and Hour Division is $168.1 million and 1,500 FTE. The Wage and Hour Division is responsible for the administration and enforcement of a wide range of laws which collectively cover virtually all private and state and local government employment. Wage and Hour Division activities include obtaining compliance with the minimum wage, overtime, child labor, and other employment standards under the Fair Labor Standards Act, Migrant and Seasonal Agricultural Worker Protection Act, certain provisions of the Immigration and Nationality Act, Employee Polygraph Protection Act, the Immigration Nursing Relief Act, the wage garnishment provisions of the Consumer Credit Protection Act, and the Family and Medical Leave Act. Prevailing wages are determined and employment standards enforced under various Government contract wage standards. Wage Hour's request does not include any new initiatives. Wage and Hour will continue to use its multi-prong approach of compliance education, partnerships, and enforcement to further its goals to promote high quality workplaces, a secure workforce and increase customer satisfaction.

Contractor EEO Enforcement

The FY 2002 budget request for OFCCP is $76.2 million and 797 FTE. The Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs (OFCCP) is responsible for ensuring equal employment opportunity and non-discrimination in employment based on race, sex, religion, color, national origin, disability or veteran status for businesses contracting with the Federal government. These requirements have been endorsed more than thirty-five years through Executive Order 11246, as amended; Section 503 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended; 38 USC 4212, Section 402 of the Vietnam Era Veterans' Readjustment Assistance Act of 1974, as amended. OFCCP shares authority with the Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS) of U.S. Department of Justice regarding the Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986 and the ESA Wage and Hour Division regarding the Family and Medical Leave Act of 1993. OFCCP also shares authority with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) in the enforcement of Title I of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990. These requirements affect the employment practices of Federal contractors and subcontractors at 200,000 worksites with a total workforce of over 26 million persons. OFCCP will continue to: use multiple approaches for conducting compliance evaluations and complaint investigations; provide comprehensive public education, and technical and compliance assistance programs; and work with industry groups.

Federal Programs for Workers' Compensation

The FY 2002 budget request for the Office of Workers' Compensation Programs (OWCP) is $123.2 million and 1,166 FTE for the Federal Employees' Compensation Act (FECA), Longshore and Harbor Workers' Compensation, and Black Lung Benefits programs. Included in the Salaries and Expenses account is $80.3 million and 845 FTE that will be financed beginning in FY 2002 by the FECA Surcharge, an initiative to finance the operations of the FECA program while boosting Federal agencies' incentives for improving safety in their workplaces. The direct budget authority for the FECA program administration ($80 million) is replaced with offsetting collections to be paid by Federal agencies based on their employees' workers' compensation benefits.

Other funding for OWCP includes $36.7 million and 133 FTE in the Special Benefits account to conduct FECA's workers' compensation program using "Fair Share" funds. OWCP also requests $136 million and 413 FTE to run the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act, which also will support the activities of the Department of Health and Human Services under the Act.

OWCP administers disability compensation programs which mitigate work related injuries or disease, through the provision of wage replacement and cash benefits, medical treatment, vocational rehabilitation, and other benefits to certain workers (or their dependents or survivors). The FECA program provides income and medical cost protection to civilian employees of the Federal government injured at work and to certain other designated groups. The Longshore and Harbor Workers' Compensation Act (LSHWCA) program provides similar protection to private sector workers in certain maritime and related employment. The Black Lung Benefits program provides protection to the Nation's coal miners suffering from pneumoconiosis.

The Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act of 2000 (EEOICPA), and Executive Order 13179 led to the establishment of a fourth OWCP program in FY 2001 to adjudicate claims and make awards of compensation and medical benefits to employees or survivors of employees of the Department of Energy (DOE) and of private companies under contract with DOE who suffer from a radiation-related cancer, beryllium-related disease, or chronic silicosis as a result of their work in producing or testing nuclear weapons. At the time the President's Budget went to press, the final structure and Executive Branch placement of the Energy Employees' Occupational Illness Compensation program had not yet been determined.

Office of Labor-Management Standards

The FY 2002 budget request for the Office of Labor-Management Standards (OLMS) is $30.6 million and 260 FTE. OLMS enforces provisions of Federal law that require reports from unions and others and establishes certain standards for union democracy and financial integrity. OLMS conducts criminal investigations (primarily union funds embezzlement) and investigative audits of unions; conducts civil investigations (primarily concerning union officer elections); supervises remedial union officer elections, as required; administers statutory reporting requirements; and provides for public disclosure of filed reports. The budget request includes funding to provide for the electronic filing and Internet public disclosure of the statutorily required reports. OLMS, through its Division of Statutory Programs, also certifies protective arrangements for transit employees when Federal transit grant funds are used to acquire, improve, or operate a transit system.

Program Direction and Support

The FY 2002 budget request for Program Direction and Support (PDS) is $13.5 million and 118 FTE. This activity supports ESA's operating programs and assures effective management by providing planning, personnel management, financial management, Federal/state liaison programs, management systems implementation, and data processing.

ESA Selected Workload Data
  FY 2001 FY 2002 Change
Wage Hour Compliance Actions Completed 47,000 47,000 0
Fed. Contractor EEO Standards: Enforcement Compliance Reviews 6,260 6,979 719
Fed. Employees Compensation Act Cases received: 172,000 170,000 -2,000
Longshore and Harbor Workers'
Compensation Act:
Lost-Time Injuries Reported
23,700 23,700 0
Black Lung Benefits Act:
Total Initial Findings
6,600 6,600 0
Labor-Management Standards:
Investigations, Compl. Audits, Elections
3,804 3,546 -258

Text Version

ESA INCOME MAINTENANCE PROGRAMS (MANDATORY)

Budget Authority/Trust Fund Transfers(Dollars in Millions)
  FY 2001 FY 2002 Change
Special Benefits:
Federal Employees Compensation Act $2,175.0 $2,223.0 $48.0
Less Fair share funding -34.9 -36.7 -1.8
Longshore and Harbor Workers' Comp. 3.0 3.0 0.0
Subtotal, Special Benefits Program 2,143.1 2,189.3 46.2
Less Chargeback Reimbursables -2,045.0 -2,082.0 -37.0
Net Carryover Balances -42.1 13.7 55.8
Total, Special Benefits 56.0 121.0 65.0
Energy Employees' Occupational Illness
Compensation Fund Program Act (EEOICPA)
358.0 597.0 239.0
Black Lung Disability Trust Fund (BLDTF) 1,027.9 1,036.0 8.1
Less Offsetting Receipts -2.0 -2.0 0.0
Less BLDTF Admin. (Excludes Treasury) -52.6 -54.7 -2.1
Total, BLDTF 973.3 979.3 6.0
Other Income Maintenance Programs: 0.0
Panama Canal Commission Fund 7.5 7.4 -0.1
Less PCC Offsetting Receipts -7.5 -7.4 0.1
Special Workers' Compensation Expenses 153.0 151.0 -2.0
Less Administrative Expenses -2.0 -2.0 0.0
Total, Special Workers' 151.0 149.0 -2.0
Total, Income Maintenance Programs $1,538.3 $1,846.3 $308.0

Text Version

The budget includes a total of $1,846.3 million for income maintenance programs in ESA in FY 2002, an increase of $308 million from FY 2001.

Special Benefits

The request of $121 million for Special Benefits in FY 2002, includes $118 million for Federal Employees' Compensation Act benefits, and $3 million for Longshore and Harbor Workers' Compensation benefits. This account also includes a request for $36.7 million from Fair Share funding to finance 133 FTE to run the FECA program, as described in the Staffing Section.

Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Benefits

The funding request for FY 2002, the first full year of this new program is $733 million. Of that amount, $597 million will provide compensation and medical benefits to eligible workers or their survivors. The request for program administration is $136 million and 413 FTE, including funding for the Department of Health and Human Services. At the time the President's Budget went to press, the final structure and Executive Branch placement of the Energy Employees' Occupational Illness Compensation program had not yet been determined.

Federal Employees' Compensation Act Benefits

FECA provides long-term compensation benefits and certain medical payments for job-related injuries, diseases, or deaths of civilian employees of the Federal government and certain other designated groups. Like the Periodic Roll Management and Quality Case Management initiatives, the FECA Surcharge proposal is expected to contribute to the reduction in overall FECA costs.

Longshore and Harbor Workers' Compensation Act Benefits

This program funds one-half of the increased benefits provided by the 1972 amendments for persons receiving compensation for permanent total disability or death which commenced or occurred prior to the amendments. Long-term compensation benefits and medical payments are provided for job-related injuries, diseases, or deaths of private sector workers in certain maritime and related employment.

Black Lung Disability Trust Fund

The budget request provides a total of $1.036 billion from the Black Lung Disability Trust Fund (BLDTF) in FY 2002 for benefit and interest payments and administrative expenses. This includes $388.3 million for benefits, $54.7 million for administrative expenses, and $593.0 million for interest payments.

Disabled Coal Miner Benefits

Under this program, all black lung compensation/medical and survivor benefit expenses are provided when no responsible mine operator can be assigned liability for such benefits, or when coal mine employment ceased prior to 1970.

Administrative Expenses

This provides for all administrative costs incurred by the Department of Labor in the operation of the Black Lung program, including reimbursements to the Departments of Health and Human Services, and Treasury.

Interest on Advances

This appropriation also funds payment of interest on advances to the BLDTF from the general fund. In FY 2002, the amount of interest on advances is estimated to be $593.0 million.

Other Income Maintenance Programs

The budget requests $7.4 million for the Panama Canal Commission Fund and $151.0 million for the Special Workers' Compensation Expenses program.

Panama Canal Commission Fund

This provides for the accumulation of funds to meet the Panama Canal Commission's obligations to defray costs of workers' compensation which will accrue pursuant to FECA.

Special Workers' Compensation Expenses Payments from the Special Fund

Under the Longshore and Harbor Workers' Compensation Act, as amended, trust funds in this program consist of amounts received from employers for the death of an employee where no person is entitled to compensation for such death, for fines and penalty payments, and pursuant to an annual assessment of the industry, for the general expenses of the funds. From these funds, certain long term compensation benefits and medical payments are provided for job-related injuries, diseases, or deaths of private sector workers in certain maritime and related employment.

OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY & HEALTH ADMINISTRATION

Budget Authority
(Dollars in Millions)
  FY 2001 FY 2002 Change
Safety and Health Standards $15.1 $13.9 $-1.2
Federal Enforcement 151.8 154.8 3.0
State Programs 88.4 88.1 -0.3
Technical Support 20.1 19.6 -0.5
Federal Compliance Assistance 55.8 57.2 1.4
State Consultation Grants 48.8 48.8 0.0
Training Grants 11.2 8.2 -3.0
Safety and Health Statistics 25.6 26.3 0.7
Executive Direction and Administration 8.6 9.0 0.4
Total, Budget Authority $425.4 $425.8 $0.4
Full Time Equivalents * 2,386 2,292 -94

Text Version

* Includes 16 reimbursable and allocated FTE.

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) promulgates occupational safety and health standards and ensures compliance by inspecting places of employment and working with employers and employees. The agency also provides consultation, training, and information services for employers and employees; assists other Federal agencies in establishing and maintaining occupational safety and health programs for Federal workers; and provides matching grants to assist states in administering and enforcing approved state occupational safety and health programs. In FY 2002, OSHA will continue its mission to save lives, prevent injuries and illnesses, and protect the health of America's workers. Consistent with its Strategic Plan, the agency will focus on the most serious hazards and most dangerous workplaces, expand compliance assistance opportunities, and measure results instead of activities. The FY 2002 budget includes $425.8 million, a slight increase over FY 2001; and 2,292 FTE.

Safety and Health Standards

The Safety and Health Standards activity provides for the development, promulgation, review and evaluation of occupational safety and health standards under procedures providing opportunities for public comment. In FY 2002, OSHA will continue to base all standards on clear and sensible priorities and review existing rules to revise or eliminate obsolete and confusing standards or provisions. In FY 2002, the budget request for this activity is $13.9 million and 95 FTE.

Federal Enforcement

The Federal Enforcement activity encourages compliance with workplace standards under the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 through the physical inspection of work sites, and by fostering the voluntary cooperation of employers and employees. The agency will continue to focus resources on those activities that will have the greatest impact on worker safety and health. OSHA will also continue to target inspections on the worst hazards and the most dangerous workplaces and assist employers and employees in creating safe and healthy workplaces. In FY 2002, the budget request for this activity is $154.8 million and 1,619 FTE.

State Programs

The State Programs activity supports grants to states to assist them in the administration of state occupational safety and health regulations. Currently, 26 states operate their own safety and health programs under this Federal aegis. State Programs support enforcement, consultation, and education and training efforts in OSHA programs operated by the states. These resources enable OSHA's state partners to meet new challenges and complement Federal OSHA's program strategies. In FY 2002, the budget request for this activity is $88.1 million.

Technical Support

This activity provides support to Federal OSHA programs in several areas, including construction, standards setting, variance determinations, compliance assistance, and enforcement. Areas of expertise include electronic compliance assistance tools, laboratory accreditation, industrial hygiene, occupational nursing, occupational medicine, and safety engineering. In FY 2002, the budget request for this activity is $19.6 million and 109 FTE.

Federal Compliance Assistance

This activity supports a variety of employer and employee assistance programs. Outreach activities are conducted, including training and information exchanges and technical assistance to employers requesting such help. Employers are encouraged to establish voluntary employee protection programs, and Federal agencies are assisted in implementing job safety and health programs for their employees. Professional training for compliance personnel and others with related workplace safety and health responsibilities is conducted at the OSHA Training Institute, and further training is provided by education centers selected and sanctioned by the Institute. In FY 2002, the budget request for this activity is $57.2 million and 359 FTE.

State Consultation Grants

This activity supports 90 percent of Federally-funded cooperative agreements with designated State agencies to provide free on-site consultation to employers upon request. State agencies tailor work plans to specific needs in each State while maximizing their impact on injury and illness rates in smaller establishments. These projects offer a variety of services, including safety and health program assessment and assistance, hazard identification and control, and training of employers and their employees. The FY 2002 request includes $48.8 million for this activity.

Training Grants

This activity supports safety and health training grants to non-profit organizations to provide employee and employer training programs targeted to address specific industry needs for safety and health education. In FY 2002, the budget request for this activity is $8.2 million.

Safety and Health Statistics

Safety and Health Statistics provides information technology, management information and statistical support for OSHA's programs and field operations through an integrated data network and statistical analysis and review. The FY 2002 request is for $26.3 million and 44 FTE for this activity.

Executive Direction and Administration

This activity provides overall direction and administrative support for the Occupational Safety and Health Administration. In FY 2002, the budget request for this activity is $9 million and 50 FTE.

OSHA Selected Workload Data
  FY 2000 FY 2001 Change
Standards Promulgated 5 6 1
Federal Inspections 36,400 36,400 0
State Program Inspections 56,300 56,000 -300
Consultation Visits 31,200 31,700 500

Text Version


MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION

Budget Authority
(Dollars in Millions)
  FY 2001 FY 2002 Change
Enforcement: Coal $114.5 $109.9 $-4.6
Enforcement: Metal/Non-Metal 55.1 60.4 5.3
Enforcement: Standards Development 1.8 2.3 0.5
Assessments 4.3 4.7 0.4
Educational Policy and Development 31.5 28.0 -3.5
Technical Support 27.1 27.4 0.3
Program Administration 12.2 13.6 1.4
Total, Budget Authority $246.3 $246.3 $0.0
Full Time Equivalents 2,357 2,310 -47

Text Version

The Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) protects the safety and health of the Nation's miners by applying the provisions of the Federal Mine Safety and Health Act of 1977. The budget request includes $246.3 million and 2,310 FTE for FY 2002, the same funding level as in FY 2001.

Enforcement: Coal

The Coal Mine Safety and Health activity is responsible for ensuring the safety and health of the Nation's coal miners through special emphasis programs, compliance and training assistance and periodic regular and special investigations. The FY 2002 request of $109.9 million and 1,141 FTE includes a shift of $3.7 million and 40 FTE from the Coal Program to the Metal and Nonmetal program. This shift will allow MSHA to address the safety and health challenges in the growing Metal and Nonmetal sector with resources from the Coal sector, which has experienced a reduction of 30 percent in the number of mines and 16 percent in the number of miners.

Enforcement: Metal/Nonmetal

A total of $60.4 million and 589 FTE is requested for Metal and Nonmetal Mine Safety and Health activities which promote a healthful working environment in the Nation's metal and nonmetal mines and mills. This goal is accomplished through compliance and training assistance, periodic regular inspections and special investigations. The request for of $60.4 million and 589 FTE includes a shift of $3.7 million and 40 FTE from the Coal Enforcement Program to the Metal and Nonmetal Enforcement program.

Enforcement: Standards Development

The $2.3 million and 18 FTE request for Standards Development activity provides for the development and promulgation of mandatory safety and health standards to promote the best possible protection for the health and safety of all miners.

Assessments

The primary functions of this activity are to assess civil monetary penalties for violations of the Mine Safety and Health Act, litigate penalty cases as necessary before the Federal Mine Safety and Health Review Commission and the Federal courts, and collect and account for all penalties received. An amount of $4.7 million and 51 FTE is requested for this activity.

Educational Policy and Development

A total of $28.0 million and 140 FTE is requested for the Educational Policy and Development activity. Activities include development and coordination of MSHA's mine safety and health education and training policies, the delivery of on-site training assistance to mines throughout the country, and the provision of classroom instruction at the National Mine Health and Safety Academy for MSHA personnel and other members of the mining industry.

Technical Support

A total of $27.4 million and 255 FTE is requested for the Technical Support activity which applies engineering and scientific expertise through field and laboratory forensic investigations to resolve technical problems associated with implementation of the Mine Act; administers a fee program to approve equipment, materials, and explosives for use in mines; and collects and analyzes data relative to the cause, frequency, and circumstances of accidents.

Program Administration

A total of $13.6 million and 116 FTE is requested for the Program Administration activity which provides leadership, policy direction, program policy evaluation and administrative support services for MSHA's safety and health programs.

MSHA Selected Workload Data
Fatality rates: 1/ FY 2000 FY 2001 Change
Coal Mines <0.035 <0.035 0
Metal/Nonmetal Mines <0.025 <0.025 0
Violations Assessed 132,000 132,000 0
Educational Policy:  
Course Days of Training 1,780 1,925 145
Technical Support:  
Approval Investigations 812 716 -96
Samples Analyzed 67,680 72,000 4,320

Text Version

1/ Incidence rates represent the number of injuries that occur for each 200,000 employee-hours worked.

BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS

Budget Authority/Trust Fund Transfers
(Dollars in Millions)
  FY 2001 FY 2002 Change
Labor Force Statistics 1/ $209.6 $215.9 $6.3
Prices and Cost of Living 135.1 149.3 14.2
Compensation and Working Conditions 71.1 74.1 3.0
Productivity and Technology 9.2 9.6 0.4
Executive Direction and Staff Services 25.9 27.1 1.2
Total, Budget Authority 450.9 $476.0 $25.1
Full Time Equivalents * 2,489 2,529 40

Test Version

* Includes 61 reimbursable FTE.

1/ In 2002, the Employment Projections budget activity will merge with the Labor Force Statistics budget activity.

The Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) is the principal fact finding agency in the Federal government in the broad field of labor economics. The BLS provides general purpose statistics that provide some of the major indicators used in: developing economic and social policy; making decisions in the business and labor communities; developing legislative and other programs affecting the labor market; conducting research on labor market issues; and projecting Federal expenditures and receipts. The request for the BLS in FY 2002 is $476.0 million and 2,529 FTE, an increase of $25.1 million and 40 FTE above the FY 2001 level.

Labor Force Statistics

The Labor Force Statistics program provides comprehensive and timely information on the labor force, employment, unemployment, and related labor market characteristics at the national level; industrial and occupational employment at the State level; and labor force and unemployment figures at State and local levels. The BLS is continuing to develop monthly estimates on the numbers of separations, new hires, and current job openings for the economy as a whole and major industry groupings. The BLS and the States will continue coding business births to both the Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) system and the North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) to support a variety of BLS program needs. In conjunction with the Census Bureau, the BLS will test the American Time-Use questionnaire, as well as the coding and case management software systems for the time-use survey, and will develop the processing system to be used in producing survey estimates. The BLS also will continue to improve the quality of estimates produced by the Local Area Unemployment Statistics program and to provide additional demographic data at the local level. In FY 2002, the Employment Projections budget activity will merge with the Labor Force Statistics budget activity. The Employment Projections group will complete the preparation of labor force, economic, industrial employment, and occupational employment projections for the 2000-2010 Occupational Outlook Handbook and will prepare four issues of the Occupational Outlook Quarterly.

Prices and Living Conditions

The Prices and Living Conditions program publishes the Consumer Price Index (CPI), the Producer Price Index (PPI), and the Export and Import Price Indexes. The program provides CPI data for many geographic areas within the United States. The program also provides estimates of consumers' incomes and expenditures that are used in analysis of price behavior and consumer spending patterns, the interpretation of price movements in relation to other major economic changes, and the formulation and evaluation of economic policy. The FY 2002 request includes $8.1 million and 40 FTE to revise and update the CPI on a continuous basis rather than a periodic basis.

Compensation and Working Conditions

The Compensation and Working Conditions program provides comprehensive data on wages and benefits by occupation and industry for major labor markets and industries. The program also compiles annual information on the incidence and number of work-related injuries, illnesses, and fatalities. In FY 2002, the BLS will continue its ongoing plan to update the sample of establishments that is used to produce the local area pay data, the Employment Cost Index, and the Employee Benefits Survey. The BLS also will publish the results of the 2000 Survey of Occupational Injuries and Illnesses and the results of the 2001 Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries.

Productivity and Technology

The Productivity and Technology program measures productivity changes for major sectors of the economy and individual industries, and analyzes trends in order to learn about the factors underlying changes in productivity. The program also develops international comparisons of productivity, hourly compensation, unit labor costs, and employment and unemployment for foreign countries. In FY 2002, the BLS will publish new measures of labor productivity and unit labor costs for 15 service-producing industries. Currently, the BLS publishes measures of multi factor productivity and related cost measures for one service-producing industry. In FY 2002, the BLS also will begin the development of multi factor productivity and related cost measures for one additional service-producing industry.

Executive Direction and Staff Services

The Executive Direction program provides for agency-wide policy and management direction, including all centralized support services in the administrative, publications, and computer systems support areas as well as the Survey Design Research Center.

BLS Selected Workload Data
  FY 2001 FY 2002 Change
Employment and Unemployment Estimates for States and Local Areas 89,544 90,000 456
Consumer Price Indexes 5,400 5,400 0
Employment Cost Index Schedules 13,200 14,400 1,200
Productivity Series Maintained 6,236 6,356 120

Text Version

OFFICE OF DISABILITY EMPLOYMENT POLICY

Budget Authority
(Dollars in Millions)
FY 2001 FY 2002 Change
Office of Disability Employment Policy $20.3 $40.6 $20.3
Task Force on the Employment of Adults with Disabilities 2.6 2.6 0.0
Total, ODEP Budget Authority $22.9 $43.2 $20.3
Full Time Equivalents 57 67 10

Text Version

The budget provides a total of $43.2 million and 67 FTE in FY 2002 to fund the Department's work toward eliminating policy barriers that impede the employment of people with disabilities.

Office of Disability Employment Policy

The FY 2002 budget includes $40.6 million and 57 FTE for the Office of Disability Employment Policy (ODEP). Congress created this office in the FY 2001 Labor appropriation, and this request reflects the second installment to phase in these important activities. ODEP's mission is to bring a heightened and permanent disability focus within DOL through policy evaluation, technical assistance and development of best practices. The office works within the Department to increase participation of people with disabilities in DOL training programs, with a targeted emphasis on those serving youth. ODEP works outside DOL through the Disability Employment Partnership Board, an advisory group established through Executive Order and comprised of up to 15 members from America's business leaders, organized labor, rehabilitation and service providers, and disability-related organizations.

The FY 2002 request for ODEP includes a $20.3 million increase above the FY 2001 level and an additional 10 FTE to support the President's New Freedom Initiative to expand employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities. The Department requests 3 FTE and $6 million for one-stop accessibility grants to support the process of implementing the "ticket to work" through One Stop Centers, 3 FTE and $6 million for Youth-to-Work to ensure that young people with disabilities participate and benefit from youth programs under the Workforce Investment Act, and 4 FTE and $8.3 million for an Olmstead grant program to assist persons with significant disabilities in making the transition from institutional settings to the community and employment.

Task Force on the Employment of Adults with Disabilities

This Task Force will continue its efforts during FY 2002 to create a coordinated and aggressive national policy to bring adults with disabilities into gainful employment at a rate that is as close as possible to that of the general population. The Secretary of Labor and the current Chairperson of the Disability Employment Partnership Board serve as chair and vice-chair, respectively. The Task Force includes heads of several Cabinet agencies as well as other Federal agencies responsible for addressing disability issues. The budget includes $2.6 million and 10 FTE to complete the work of the Task Force in FY 2002. The Task Force has targeted July 26, 2002 for delivery of the fourth and final report to the President.

DEPARTMENTAL MANAGEMENT

Budget Authority/Trust Fund Transfers
(Dollars in Millions)

  FY 2001 FY 2002 Change
Program Direction and Support $26.3 $26.5 $0.2
Legal Services 81.3 81.9 0.6
International Labor Affairs 148.0 71.6 -76.4
Administration and Management 24.7 29.7 5.0
Adjudication 39.7 40.4 0.7
Women's Bureau 10.2 10.2 0.0
Civil Rights 5.8 5.8 0.0
Chief Financial Officer 6.0 6.3 0.3
Information Technology Activities 37.0 80.0 43.0
Total, Budget Authority 379.0 352.4 -26.6
Full Time Equivalents 1/ 2,369 2,259 -110

Text Version

1/ Includes 719 FTE in FY 2001 and 707 FTE in FY 2002 for the Working Capital Fund; and 35 FTE in FY 2001 and FY 2002 for DM reimbursable activities.

The Departmental Management (DM) appropriation provides funding for the following activities: Program Direction and Support, Legal Services, International Labor Affairs, Administration and Management, Adjudication, Women's Bureau, Civil Rights, Chief Financial Officer and a centralized Information Technology Activity administered by the CIO office. These activities are responsible for formulating and overseeing the achievement of Departmental policy, for the overall management of the Department, and for providing a variety of unique services in ensuring equal employment opportunity in Departmental programs, and in supporting the rights of workers and promoting issues involving women in America's workplaces.

The budget for the DM appropriation is $352.4 million and 1,552 FTE plus 707 FTE in the Working Capital Fund for an overall total of 2,259 FTE in FY 2002, a decrease of $26.6 million and 110 FTE over FY 2001. The Working Capital Fund, which is a no-year revolving fund that provides centralized administrative support services financed through assessments of DOL agencies, will increase by $603 thousand.

Program Direction and Support

The Program Direction and Support (PDS) activity includes a total budget request of $26.5 million and 153 FTE for FY 2002. The PDS activity includes the immediate Offices of the Secretary and Deputy Secretary, provides leadership and direction for overall initiatives, programs and functions assigned to the Department. In addition, PDS provides guidance for the development and implementation of government policy to protect and promote the interest of the American worker toward achieving better employment and earnings, to promote productivity and economic growth, safety, equity and affirmative action in employment, to collect and analyze statistics on the economy including the labor force, to monitor and evaluate emerging economic and international and national labor market trends and events and to promote lifelong learning in the 21st century. PDS activities are central to the achievement of the Department's overall mission. Under the direction of the Secretary, the agenda for major program initiatives in such areas as pension protection, child labor, One Stop Centers, and unemployment insurance reform is forged.

Legal Services

The Office of the Solicitor (SOL) includes a total budget request of $81.9 million and 659 FTE for FY 2002. The SOL independently litigates cases in the U.S. District Courts, Courts of Appeals, and before administrative law judges and administrative appellate bodies; serves as the co-counsel to the Solicitor General in Department-related litigation in the U.S. Supreme Court; assists the Justice Department and local U.S. Attorneys offices in case preparation and trial; supports regulatory reform through the review of rules and regulations; provides oral and written interpretations and opinions to the client agencies concerning the statutes which the Department enforces; coordinates the Department's legislative program; reviews proposed legislation and assists in drafting legislation; prepares testimony and reports on proposed legislation as requested by the Congress and the Office of Management and Budget, as well as annual reports to the Congress; provides legal advice to interagency groups responsible for U.S. trade matters; assists in negotiating international agreements; and participates in international organizations including the International Labor Organization (ILO). The Office of the Solicitor also serves as "House Counsel" to the Department on a variety of matters, including labor management relations and ethics.

International Labor Affairs

The Bureau of International Labor Affairs (ILAB) coordinates the Department's global responsibilities and provides expert support for many of the Administration's international initiatives. The total request in FY 2002 is $71.6 million and 100 FTE for international labor activities. The mission of the Bureau is to assist in formulating the U.S. international policies and programs of concern to American workers. Other long-standing responsibilities of the Bureau include representing the U.S. government at the International Labor Organization (ILO) and on the Employment, Labor and Social Affairs (ELSA) Committee of the Organization of Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). The FY 2002 request recognizes the importance of promoting international labor standards and reducing child labor throughout the world while at the same time managing the growth of this activity. These vital programs have grown by 77 percent since FY 1999. The FY 2002 request brings this activity into a more manageable ramp up and allows the Department to integrate activities in ILAB with the overall foreign policy of the Administration.

In this budget, the Bureau continues its work on the global HIV/AIDS initiative begun in FY 2001. It will also continue bilateral and multilateral projects to help developing countries establish basic labor protections enabling workers everywhere to enjoy fundamental principles of employee rights. These programs help strengthen developing countries' ability to implement social safety net policies and programs needed to foster economic growth. ILAB will continue working with the ILO on the declaration on core labor standards, as well as follow-up work to the new ILO Convention on the Worst Forms of Child Labor. The request will allow the Bureau to continue support of the ILO's International Program on the Elimination of Child Labor on projects that remove children from exploitative work and provide them education and their families with viable economic alternatives.

Administration and Management

The FY 2002 budget includes $29.7 million and 112 FTE for the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Administration and Management (OASAM) to provide leadership and policy guidance in the areas of budget, human resources, information technology, management and administration for the Department's program agencies. OASAM's mission also includes providing centralized administrative and support services to the program agencies through the Working Capital Fund. This arrangement allows Departmental employees to achieve efficiency and cost effectiveness in the provision of such services. The Department requests an increase of $5 million in this activity to carry out program evaluation activities on a department-wide basis to improve overall program effectiveness and data quality pursuant to the Government Performance and Results Act.

Adjudication

The Adjudication activity consists of four components: the Office of Administrative Law Judges, the Benefits Review Board, the Employees' Compensation Appeals Board and the Administrative Review Board. In FY 2002, the total budget requested for these four agencies is $40.4 million and 327 FTE. These components preside over either formal hearings and render timely decisions, or review and decide appeals, on claims filed under numerous statutes, including the Black Lung Benefits Act, the Longshore and Harbor Workers' Compensation Act and its extensions, the Federal Employees' Compensation Act and numerous other acts involving complaints to determine violations of minimum wage requirements, overtime payments, health and safety regulations and unfair labor practices. Final decisions are prepared for the Secretary, Deputy Secretary and other deciding officials in adjudicated administrative decisions.

Women's Bureau

The Women's Bureau is the only Federal agency with primary responsibility for promoting the welfare and interests of working women. The FY 2002 budget includes $10.2 million and 71 FTE for the Women's Bureau. The mission of the Bureau is to improve women's working conditions, to eliminate the barriers that restrict women in reaching their full potential in the workplace, to advance their opportunities for profitable employment, and to operate a clearinghouse of information to address issues facing working women and their families. The Bureau continues its focus on areas including the importance of pay and benefits issues (including opportunities for women in high-tech careers), balancing work and family, and valuing women's work through job training and career development.

Civil Rights

The Civil Rights activity is responsible for ensuring full compliance with Title VI of the Civil Rights Act, the Age Discrimination Act, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act, Section 188 of the Workforce Investment Act, Title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act, and the regulatory provisions implementing those statutes. The nondiscrimination provisions are applicable to programs receiving or benefitting from financial assistance from DOL. In addition, this activity ensures equal employment opportunity for all DOL employees and applicants for employment. The total proposed funding in the FY 2002 budget for this activity is $5.8 million and 50 FTE. This request is part of the overall DOL strategy to promote voluntary compliance in DOL enforcement activities, and in conjunction with the Office of Disability Employment Policy, to place special emphasis on improving access to DOL financial assistance programs for persons with disabilities.

Chief Financial Officer

The Office of the Chief Financial Officer is responsible for enhancing knowledge and skills of Departmental staff working in financial management operations, developing comprehensive accounting and financial management policies, assuring that all Departmental financial functions conform to applicable standards, providing leadership and coordination to the Department's trust and benefit fund financial actions, monitoring the financial execution of the budget in relation to actual expenditures, and managing a comprehensive training program for accounting and financial support staff. The budget includes $6.3 million and 45 FTE, an increase of $300 thousand, for this organization in FY 2002. The increase will enable the OCFO to develop financial tools for grant programs and to monitor grantee cost reports.

Information Technology Activities

This request includes $80 million for the second year of an effort to replace previously duplicative and disparate systems with a coordinated approach to provide centralized IT investments for the Department of Labor (DOL) managed by the Chief Information Officer. As required by the Clinger Cohen Act, in 1996, the Department established a Chief Information Officer accountable for IT management in the DOL, and implemented an IT Capital Investment

Management process for selecting, controlling, and evaluating IT investments. The request reflects a $43 million increase to support the acquisition of Departmental information technology, architecture, infrastructures, equipment, software and related needs which is allocated by the Department's Chief Information Officer in accordance with the Department's capital investment management process to assure a sound investment strategy for the entire Department. These information technology resources will ensure overall program effectiveness and communication among DOL programs, participants, and employees nationwide.

Working Capital Fund

The Department's agencies finance the Working Capital Fund (WCF) for centralized administrative services. A revolving fund, the WCF operates at rates that return in full, all expenses in operation, including reserves for accrued annual leave and depreciation of capitalized assets. For FY 2002, the Working Capital Fund's operating level totals $113.6 million and 707 FTE to support administrative and management services for all DOL programs nationwide.

VETERANS EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING SERVICE

Budget Authority/Trust Fund Transfers
(Dollars in Millions)

  FY 2001 FY 2002 Change
State Administration:
Disabled Veterans Outreach Program 81.6 $81.6 $0.0
Local Veterans Employment Reps. 77.3 77.3 0.0
Administration 26.0 26.0 0.0
National Veterans Training Institute 2.0 2.0 0.0
Total, Budget Authority (Trust Funds) $186.9 $186.9 $0.0
Homeless Veterans' Reintegration Project 17.5 17.5 0.0
Veterans' Workforce Investment Program 7.3 7.3 0.0
Total, Budget Authority (All Sources) $211.7 $211.7 $0.0
Full Time Equivalents 255 250 -5

Text Version

The Veterans' Employment and Training Service (VETS) provides maximum employment and training opportunities for veterans and serves as the principal advisor to the Secretary of Labor on all policies and procedures affecting veterans. VETS sets counseling, training, and placement policies and goals for veterans through the public employment service and other employment and training programs. The budget request includes $211.7 million and 250 FTE for FY 2002.

State Administration: Disabled Veterans' Outreach Program

The Disabled Veterans' Outreach Program (DVOP) provides intensive employment and employability development services to disabled veterans and to economically disadvantaged veterans through a system of State-employed, federally-funded program specialists. Many DVOP specialists are stationed at homeless veteran shelters, VA community based VET Centers and other VA locations. The FY 2002 budget request for this activity is $81.6 million.

State Administration: Local Veterans' Employment Representatives

The Local Veterans' Employment Representative (LVER) program provides service to veterans and staff. LVERs supervise the provision of services to veterans by other staff in local One Stop Centers and in State Employment Service Offices. LVER staff also maintain contact with local community leaders, train service members about to separate from active duty through the Transition Assistance Program, provide labor exchange information to veterans, promote and monitor participation of veterans in federally-funded employment and training programs, and monitor the listing of jobs from, and referrals to, Federal contractors and subcontractors. The FY 2002 budget request for this activity is $77.3 million.

Administration

The Administration activity supports a federal staff which ensures veterans' reemployment rights and administers State staffing grants for the DVOP and LVER programs, Veterans Workforce Investment program and Homeless Veterans' Reintegration Project grants. The agency staff conduct on-site monitoring and management assistance, coordinate with other Federal agencies, and collect and analyze information on employment and training services provided to veterans as required by law. Funds will maintain a training capacity for about 120,000 TAP participants and the capacity to process approximately 1,500 veteran employment and reemployment rights complaints. The FY 2002 funding for this activity is $26 million and 250 FTE.

The National Veterans' Training Institute

The National Veterans' Training Institute (NVTI) provides training to both Federal and State employees and managers involved in the delivery of services to veterans. The institute provides courses of training covering such subjects as reemployment rights, veteran benefits, and basic DVOP and LVER labor exchange training. In FY 2002, $2 million is requested for NVTI to train more than 1,300 veteran service providers, with emphasis on labor exchange and case management training.

Homeless Veterans Program

In FY 2002 the funding request for this program is $17.5 million to conduct a Homeless Veterans' Program as authorized by the Stewart B. McKinney Homeless Assistance Act and title 38. This request is the same amounts as the current appropriation. The program will provide employment and training assistance to homeless veterans, with expected job placements of approximately 10,000.

Veterans Workforce Investment Program

In FY 2002, the funding request for this program is $7.3 million which is to conduct a training and employment program for veterans under the Workforce Investment Act (Sec. 168). The program will provide training opportunities for service connected disabled veterans, and recently separated and other veterans with significant barriers to employment. This program will help 2,240 veterans into jobs.

OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL

Budget Authority/Trust Fund Transfers
(Dollars in Millions)
  FY 2001 FY 2002 Change
Program Activities $48.2 $50.4 $2.2
Executive Direction and Management 6.8 7.1 0.3
Total, OIG Budget Authority $55.0 $57.5 $2.5
Full Time Equivalents 428 428 0

Text Version

The Office of Inspector General (OIG) is comprised of two activities: Program Activities, and Executive Direction and Management. The budget request includes $57.5 million and 428 FTE for FY 2002.

Program Activities

Program activities within the Office of Inspector General help prevent and detect fraud and abuse in Department of Labor programs and operations. These program activities include audit, program fraud, labor racketeering, and special evaluations and inspections of program activities. The audit activity performs audits of the Department's financial statements, programs, activities, and systems to determine whether information is reliable, controls are in place, resources are safeguarded, funds are expended in a manner consistent with laws and regulations and managed economically and efficiently, and desired program results are achieved. The program fraud activity administers an investigative program to detect and deter fraud, waste and abuse in Departmental programs.

Unlike other Inspectors General, the Department of Labor OIG has mission-related program responsibility for investigating racketeering and corruption in the American workplace. The labor racketeering activity identifies and reduces labor racketeering and corruption in employee benefit plans, labor-management relations, and internal union affairs. The Office of Analysis, Complaints and Evaluations conducts program evaluations and special reviews of selected DOL programs or functions, analyzes complaints involving DOL programs, operations or functions and provides Congressional liaison. The OIG also provides technical assistance to DOL program agencies.

Executive Direction and Management

This activity includes the management, legal counsel, administrative support, personnel and financial functions for the OIG.


OIG Selected Workload Data
FY 2001 FY 2002 Change
Audit Reports Issued 70 75 5
Investigations completed 521 545 24
Performance Goal: Evaluations Issued 15 15 0

Text Version


DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
DISCRETIONARY AND MANDATORY BUDGET AUTHORITY

- Dollars in Millions -

      FY 2000
BUD. AUTH.
  FY 2001
BUD. AUTH.
  FY 2002
BUD. AUTH.
  FY 2002-2001
DIFFERENCE
DISCRETIONARY PROGRAMS                      
Training and Employment Services.......................................... 5,453.4     5,670.0     5,128.5     (541.4)
Community Service Emp. for Older Americans.................................... 440.2     440.2     440.2     0.0
State Employment Service Operations.................................... 968.1     1,016.4     1,000.4     (16.0)
Veterans Employment and Training................................... 157.5     183.7     183.7     0.0
Gifts and Bequests........................................................................... 0.2     0.2     0.2     0.0
Advances to ESA Account of UTF........................................................................... 0.0     0.0     0.0     0.0
Employment and Training Total......................................... 7,019.3     7,310.4     6,753.0     (557.4)
                     
State Unemployment Insurance Operations.......................... 2,266.4     2,363.8     2,413.9     50.1
                     
Employment and Training Operations.................................. 146.0     158.9     161.1     2.2
Pension and Welfare Benefits Administration......................... 98.9     107.6     108.0     0.4
Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation................................. 11.1     11.7     11.7     0.0
Employment Standards Administration 1/.................................. 367.4     393.0     396.3     3.3
Proposed FECA Surcharge.....................................…   0.0     0.0     (80.3)     (80.3)
Occupational Safety & Health Administration....................... 381.5     425.4     425.8     0.4
Mine Safety and Health Administration.................................. 228.0     246.3     246.3     0.0
Bureau of Labor Statistics..................................................... 413.2     450.9     476.0     25.1
Disability Policy.......................................................…   7.2     23.0     43.3     20.3
Departmental Management 1/.................................................... 258.4     379.0     352.4     (26.6)
Veterans Employment and Training............................................... 26.9     28.0     28.0     0.0
Office of Inspector General 1/................................................. 52.2     55.0     57.5     2.5
Working Capital Fund [net] (WCF)..................................... 0.0     0.0     0.0     0.0
Worker Prot., Sfty & Health, & Stats Total 1/......................................... 1,991.0     2,278.7     2,226.0     (52.7)
TOTAL DISCRETIONARY 1/................ 11,276.7     11,952.9     11,392.8     (560.0)
                     
MANDATORY PROGRAMS                    
Federal Unemployment Benefits & Allowances................... 415.2     406.6     415.7     9.1
Training and Employment Services............................…   0.0     0.0     2,463.0     2,463.0
TES H1B Fees........................................................................... 75.6     179.9     213.4     33.6
ESA H1B Fees.......................................................................... 8.1     12.1     13.5     1.3
Payments to the UTF................................................................... 0.0     0.0     0.0     0.0
Adv to the Unemp Trust Fund and Other Funds.............. 0.0     0.0     0.0     0.0
Unemployment Trust Fund (UTF) Base................................ 24,150.2     29,038.0     31,989.5     2,951.6
[Transfer from UTF]............................................................ (3,360.2)     (3,494.5)     (3,546.7)     (52.2)
Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation.................................. 0.0     0.0     0.0     0.0
[Administrative Expenses - Lim]....................................... (11.1)     (11.7)     (11.7)     0.0
[Services Related To Terminations] {Non-Add}................................... 163.6     164.8     178.9     14.1
Special Benefits........................................................................... 79.0     56.0     121.0     65.0
DOE Compensation Fund..........................................…   0.0     358.0     597.0     239.0
Panama Canal Commission (PCC)................................................... 5.2     7.5     7.4     (0.1)
Black Lung Disability Trust Fund (BLDTF).............................. 1,007.9     1,028.0     1,036.0     8.0
[Transfer from BLDTF]....................................................... (49.8)     (52.2)     (54.5)     (2.3)
Special Workers Compensation Expenses.................................. 148.7     153.0     149.0     (4.0)
[Transfer from SWCEP]....................................................... (1.7)     (2.0)     (2.0)     0.0
Welfare-To-Work Jobs, Mandatory............................................... (137.2)     (50.0)     0.0     50.0
Proprietary Receipts: UTF.................................................. (2.0)     (2.0)     (2.0)     0.0
Proprietary Receipts: BLDTF.................................................. (2.0)     (2.0)     (2.0)     0.0
Offsetting Receipts: PCC......................................................... (5.0)     (5.0)     (5.0)     0.0
DOE Administrative..................................................…   0.0     50.2     136.0     85.8
Interfund Transactions......................................................... (397.0)     (466.0)     (483.0)     (17.0)
TOTAL MANDATORY..........................… 21,923.8     27,203.940     33,034.7     5,830.7
                     
SUBTOTAL............................................. 33,200.5     39,156.8     44,427.5     5,270.7
TES Advance (2,463.0)     0.0     0.0      
                       
TOTAL, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR..... 30,737.5     39,156.8     44,427.5      
1/ Includes Black Lung Trust Fund Transfers                      

Text Version




DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
DISCRETIONARY AND MANDATORY OUTLAYS

- Dollars in Millions -

    FY 2000
OUTLAYS
  FY 2001
OUTLAYS
  FY 2002
OUTLAYS
  FY 2002-2001
DIFFERENCE
         
DISCRETIONARY PROGRAMS                
Training and Employment Services.......................................... 4,282.0   5,191.0   6,225.0   1,034.0
Community Service Emp. for Older Americans.................................... 400.0   476.6   440.2   (36.4)
State Employment Service Operations.................................... 1,035.1   963.4   999.2   35.8
Veterans Employment and Training................................. 151.6   160.7   177.1   16.4
Gifts and Bequests........................................................................... 0.1   0.0   0.0   0.0
Employment and Training Total......................................... 5,868.7   6,791.7   7,841.5   1,049.8
               
State Unemployment Insurance Operations.......................... 2,266.4   2,363.8   2,413.9   50.1
               
Employment and Training Operations.................................. 145.6   167.1   161.1   (6.0)
Pension and Welfare Benefits Administration......................... 91.8   105.9   107.9   2.0
Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation................................. 11.1   11.7   11.7   0.0
Employment Standards Administration 1/.................................. 359.2   396.3   391.5   (4.7)
Proposed FECA Surcharge.....................................…   0.0   0.0   (80.3)   (80.3)
Occupational Safety & Health Administration....................... 366.8   417.5   425.1   7.6
Mine Safety and Health Administration.................................. 225.2   244.5   246.1   1.7
Bureau of Labor Statistics..................................................... 409.7   430.7   457.1   26.4
Disability Policy.......................................................…   3.6   17.9   38.6   20.7
Departmental Management 1/.................................................... 232.5   341.6   351.4   9.8
Veterans Employment and Training............................................... 26.9   28.0   28.0   0.0
Office of Inspector General 1/................................................. 48.1   54.8   57.2   2.4
Working Capital Fund [net] (WCF)..................................... 4.0   6.0   2.0   (4.0)
Worker Prot., Sfty & Health, & Stats Total 1/......................................... 1,924.6   2,221.7   2,197.3   (24.4)
               
TOTAL DISCRETIONARY 1/................. 10,059.6   11,377.222   12,452.8   1,075.6
               
MANDATORY PROGRAMS              
Federal Unemployment Benefits & Allowances................... 404.0   415.6   420.0   4.4
Training and Employment Services............................…   0.0   0.0   0.0   0.0
TES H1B Fees........................................................................... 0.2   75.0   134.1   59.1
ESA H1B Fees.......................................................................... 5.2   11.1   16.0   4.9
Payments to the UTF................................................................... 0.0   0.0   0.0   0.0
Adv to the Unemp Trust Fund and Other Funds.............. 0.0   0.0   0.0   0.0
Unemployment Trust Fund (UTF) Base................................ 24,149.5   29,013.7   31,990.3   2,976.6
[Transfer from UTF]............................................................ (3,359.5)   (3,470.2)   (3,547.5)   (77.2)
Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation.................................. (1,145.0)   (1,200.0)   (1,604.0)   (404.0)
[Administrative Expenses - Lim]....................................... (11.1)   (11.7)   (11.7)   0.0
[Services Related To Terminations] {Non-Add}................................... 163.6   164.8   178.9   14.1
Special Benefits........................................................................... 24.8   133.0   143.0   10.0
DOE Compensation Fund..........................................…   0.0   358.0   597.0   239.0
Panama Canal Commission (PCC)................................................... 6.5   7.0   6.7   (0.3)
Black Lung Disability Trust Fund (BLDTF).............................. 1,007.9   1,028.0   1,036.0   8.0
[Transfer from BLDTF]....................................................... (49.8)   (52.2)   (54.5)   (2.3)
Special Workers Compensation Expenses.................................. 142.6   148.0   146.8   (1.2)
[Transfer from SWCEP]....................................................... (1.7)   (2.0)   (2.0)   0.0
Welfare-To-Work Jobs, Mandatory....................................................................... 526.9   849.7   690.4   (159.3)
Proprietary Receipts: UTF.................................................. (2.0)   (2.0)   (2.0)   0.0
Proprietary Receipts: BLDTF.................................................. (2.0)   (2.0)   (2.0)   0.0
Offsetting Receipts: PCC......................................................... (5.0)   (5.0)   (5.0)   0.0
DOE Administrative..................................................…   0.0   14.9   120.0   105.1
Interfund Transactions......................................................... (397.0)   (466.0)   (483.0)   (17.0)
               
TOTAL MANDATORY......................... 21,294.5   26,843.1   29,588.8   2,745.7
                 
TOTAL, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR...... 31,354.1   38,220.3   42,041.5    
1/ Includes Black Lung Trust Fund Transfers            

Text Version




U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
FULL-TIME EQUIVALENT (FTE) EMPLOYMENT
FY 2002 President's Budget Submission

  FY 2000   FY 2001   FY 2002   FY 01-02
Difference
               
               
Employment and Training Administration 1,328   1,388   1,353   -35
               
Pension Welfare and Benefits Administration 747   850   837   -13
               
Pension Benefits Guaranty Corporation 724   754   754   0
               
Employment Standards Administration 3,845   4,084   3,991   -93
               
Energy Employees' Occupational Illness Compensation 0   250   413   163
               
Occupational Safety and Health Administration 2,160   2,386   2,292   -94
               
Mine Safety and Health Administration 2,202   2,357   2,310   -47
               
Bureau of Labor Statistics 2,400   2,489   2,529   40
               
Departmental Management 1,503   1,650   1,552   -98
               
Office of Disability Employment Policy 36   57   67   10
               
Veterans' Employment and Training 249   255   250   -5
               
Office of Inspector General 409   428   428   0
               
Working Capital Fund 734   719   707   -12
  __________   __________   __________   __________
               
Total FTE Employment 16,337   17,667   17,483   -184

Text Version