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Secretary of Labor Thomas E. Perez
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FY 2004 Annual Performance Plan

Appendix A Cont.

Outcome Goal 2.2:  Protect Worker Benefits

Performance Goal 2.2A

FY 2004:  Make timely and accurate benefit payments to unemployed workers, facilitate the reemployment of Unemployment Insurance claimants, and set up Unemployment tax accounts promptly for new employers.

FY 2003: Make timely and accurate benefit payments to unemployed workers, facilitate the reemployment of Unemployment Insurance claimants, and set up Unemployment tax accounts promptly for new employers.

FY 2002: Same as above.

FY 2000 – 2001: Unemployed workers receive fair Unemployment Insurance benefit eligibility determinations and timely benefit payments.

FY 1999: N/A

Results

FY 2003: This goal was substantially achieved.

  • 89% of all first payments for intrastate full weeks of unemployment were made within 21 days. The target was 91%;
  • 56.1% of the estimated amount of overpayments that states could detect and recover was established for recovery. The target was 59%.
  • The entered employment measure is under development within DOL; and
  • 83.7% of new status determinations were made within 90 days of the quarter in which liability occurred. The target was 80%.

FY 2002: This goal was not achieved.

  • 89% of all first payments for intrastate full weeks of unemployment were made within 21 days. The target was 91%;
  • An appropriate accuracy and integrity measure and baseline were established;
  • The entered employment measure is under development within DOL; and
  • 81.7% of new status determinations were made within 90 days of the quarter in which liability occurred. The target was 80%.

FY 2001: This goal was not achieved.

  • Twenty-five states met or exceeded the minimum performance criterion forbenefit adjudication quality (nationwide, 71.1% of all non-monetary determinations were adequate) against the FY 2001 target of 26; and
  • Forty-two states met or exceeded the Secretary's Standard for intrastatepayment timeliness against a target of 48 states (nationally, 90.3% of all intrastate first payments were made within 14/21 days).

FY 2000: This goal was substantially achieved.

  • 23 states met or exceeded the minimum performance criterion for benefit adjudication quality against the FY 2000 target of 24 states (nationwide, 70.3% of all non-monetary determinations were adequate, the same as in FY1999); and
  • 47 states met or exceeded the Secretary's Standard for intrastate payment timeliness against a target of 47 states (nationally, 89.9% of all intrastate first payments were made within 14/21 days, up from 89.6% in FY 2000).

FY 1999: N/A

Indicator

FY 2004:

  • Pay Benefits Promptly (formerly Payment Timeliness): 89.2% of all intrastate first payments will be made within 14/21 days;
  • Detect Overpayments (formerly Payment Accuracy) Establish for recovery at least 59% of the amount of estimated overpayments that the States detect;
  • Facilitate Reemployment: A method for establishing an entered employment rate for UI claimants was pilot tested in FY 2003, and a baseline will be established using pilot data; and
  • Establish Tax Accounts Promptly: 82.2% of determinations about the Unemployment Insurance tax liability of new employers will be made within 90 days of the end of the first quarter they become liable for the tax.

FY 2003:

  • Payment Timeliness: 91% of all intrastate first payments will be made within 14/21 days;
  • Payment Accuracy: Establish for recovery at least 59% of all estimated detectable overpayments;
  • Facilitate Reemployment: A data source will be selected and a baseline for the entered employment rate of Unemployment Insurance claimants will be established during early FY 2004 (earlier if data are available); and
  • Establish Tax Accounts Promptly: 80% of new employers status determinations will be made within 90 days of the end of the first quarter in which liability occurred.

FY 2002:

  • Payment Timeliness: 91% of all intrastate first payments will be made within 14/21 days;
  • Payment Accuracy: Establish a baseline to improve UI accuracy nationwide
  • Facilitate Reemployment: Define a measure of entered employment of Unemployment Insurance claimants and establish a baseline; and
  • Establish Tax Accounts Promptly: 80% of new employers will receive a determination about their Unemployment Insurance tax liability within 90 days of the end of the first quarter they become liable for the tax.

FY 2001:

  • Eligibility Determinations Fairness: Increase to 26 the number of states meeting or exceeding the minimum performance criterion for benefit adjudication quality; and
  • Payment Timeliness: Increase to 48 the number of states meeting or exceeding the Secretary's Standard (minimum performance criterion) for intrastate payment timeliness.

FY 2000:

  • Eligibility Determinations Fairness: Increase to 24 the number of states meeting or exceeding the minimum performance criterion for benefit adjudication quality; and
  • Payment Timeliness: Increase to 47 the number of states meeting or exceeding the Secretary's Standard (minimum performance criterion) for intrastate payment timeliness.

FY 1999: N/A

Data Source

ETA 9050 Report; Benefits Accuracy Measurement (BAM) data, and ETA 227 Report; UI Wage Records; ETA 581 Report.

Baseline

FY 2001 (New measures):

  • Payment Timeliness: 89.9% of all intrastate first payments were made within 14/21 days
  • Payment Accuracy: 57.9% of estimated recoverable overpayments most readily detectable by State Benefit Payment Control operations were established for recovery.
  • Entered Employment: N/A
  • Establish Tax Accounts Promptly: 79.1% of new employers received a determination about their UI tax liability within 90 days of the end of the first quarter they became liable for the tax.

Comment

DOL announced new Unemployment Insurance performance goals and indicators for FY 2002 and beyond to better reflect the level of customer service, program integrity, and the extent Unemployment Insurance claimants become reemployed.

Performance Goal 2.2B

FY 2004: Enhance Pension and Health Benefit Security

FY 2003 New Measure

Results

FY 2003:  Civil Ratio – 69%, Criminal Ratio 40%, Customer Satisfaction Score 59

Indicator

Enforcement:

  • Employee benefits: Achieve greater than 50% ratio of closed civil cases with corrected violations to civil closed cases.
  • Employee benefits: Achieve greater than 25% ratio of criminal cases referred for prosecution to total criminal cases.

Participant Assistance

Achieve a Customer Satisfaction Index of 62, or comparable measurement, for: participants and beneficiaries who have contacted EBSA for assistance.*

*(The target index is subject to change pending The Gallup Organization's program evaluation report)

Data Source

Enforcement Management System

The Gallup Organization

The American Customer Satisfaction Index

Baseline

46.04% (FY99-FY01 Average)

23.45% (FY99-FY01 Average)

53 (FY 2001) [1-100 Scale]

Comment

EBSA stakeholders operate in a voluntary environment (i.e. employers opt to offer (or not) pension and health benefits and employees choose whether to participate). EBSA's mission is to operate balanced programs of enforcement, compliance assistance, outreach and education that serve both plan professionals and participants and beneficiaries. Ultimately, EBSA's efforts attempt to enhance pension and health benefit security in a universe of 6 million benefit plans, 150 million participants and beneficiaries, and approximately $4.8 trillion in assets. There is no quantifiable, pure outcome measure to determine whether EBSA is successful. Externalities, such as the economy, have a significant impact on whether employers opt to offer benefits and whether employees choose to participate and to what extent. Therefore, EBSA's mission is to ensure that our stakeholders (plan professionals and participants) are empowered with knowledge to comply with the law and/or to make personal choices. In the absence of having a pure, outcome measure, describing success in enhancing the security of pension and health benefits in this complex environment involves selecting key indices that, if achieved, provide a reasonable indication or logical connection to success. It is within this context that EBSA developed new performance measures to better communicate its performance. In developing these indices, EBSA strives to: (1) maintain maximum flexibility for the Secretary to make policy judgments regarding enforcement, compliance assistance, outreach and education; (2) reflect EBSA's effectiveness in achieving these policy choices; (3) avoid creating perverse incentives (i.e. complex v. easy, monetary v. non-monetary recovery, big v. small plans, health v. pension); and (4) measure a multitude of diverse activities (e.g. education/outreach, technical assistance, enforcement). By measuring these indices, coupled with other underlying management information, the effectiveness of our program can be measured and logically connected to enhancing benefit security.

Performance Goal 2.2C

FY 2004: Minimize the human, social, and financial impact of work-related injuries for workers and their families.

  1. For FECA cases of the United States Postal Service, reduce the lost production days rate (LPD per 100 employees) by 1% from the FY 2003 baseline.
  2. For FECA cases of All Other Governmental Agencies, reduce the lost production days rate (LPD per 100 employees) by 1% from the FY 2003 baseline.
  3. Increase FECA Vocational Rehabilitation placements with new employers for injured USPS employees by 15% over FY 2002.
  4. Through use of Periodic Roll Management, produce $38 million in cumulative (FY 2003-FY 2004) first-year savings in the FECA program.
  5. The trend in the indexed cost per case of FECA cases receiving medical treatment will remain below the comparable measure for nationwide health care costs.
  6. Meet 60% of the annual targets for five communications performance areas.
  7. Reduce by 4% over the FY 2002 established baseline the average time required to resolve disputed issues in Longshore and Harbor Worker's Compensation Program contested cases.
  8. Increase by 8% over the FY 2001 established baseline the percentage of Black Lung benefit claims filed under the revised regulations for which, following an eligibility decision by the district director, there are no requests for further action from any party pending one year after receipt of the claim.
  9. 77% of Initial Claims for benefits in the Energy Program are processed within standard timeframes.
  10. 77% of Final Decisions in the Energy Program are processed within standard timeframes.

FY 2003: Minimize the human, social, and financial impact of work-related injuries for workers and their families.

  1. For FECA cases of the United States Postal Service, reduce the lost production days rate (LPD per 100 employees) by 1% from the FY 2002 baseline.
  2. For FECA cases of All Other Governmental Agencies, reduce the lost production days rate (LPD per 100 employees) by 3% from the FY 2001 baseline.
  3. Increase FECA Vocational Rehabilitation placements with new employers for injured USPS employees by 5% over FY 2002.
  4. Through use of Periodic Roll Management, produce $20 million in first-year savings in the FECA program.
  5. The trend in the indexed cost per case of FECA cases receiving medical treatment will remain below the comparable measure for nationwide health care costs.
  6. Establish or complete baselines in key FECA customer service areas.
  7. Reduce by 2% over the FY 2002 baseline the average time required to resolve disputed issues in Longshore and Harbor Worker's Compensation Program contested cases.
  8. Increase by 4% over the FY 2001 established baseline the percentage of Black Lung benefit claims filed under the revised regulations for which, following an eligibility decision by the district director, there are no requests for further action from any party pending one year after receipt of the claim.
  9. 75% of Initial Claims for benefits in the Energy Program are processed within standard timeframes.
  10. 75% of Final Decisions in the Energy Program are processed within standard timeframes

FY 2002: Minimize the human, social, and financial impact of work-related injuries for workers and their families.

  1. 1. Decrease by 2% from the FY 2001 baseline the average number of production days lost due to disability in the FECA program for
    1. United States Postal Service (USPS ) cases
    2. All other Government cases.
  2. Reduce by 2% over the baseline the average time required to resolve disputed issues in Longshore and Harbor Worker's Compensation Program contested cases.
  3. Increase by 2% over the FY 2001 established baseline the percentage of Black Lung benefit claims for which, following an eligibility decision by the district director, there are no requests for further action from any party pending one year after receipt of the claim.
  4. For Initial Processing of claims for benefits in the Energy Program:
    1. 75% of claims of Department of Energy (DOE) employees, or of contractors employed at DOE facilities, are processed within 120 days.
    2. 75% of claims of employees of Atomic Weapons Employers (AME) and Beryllium Vendors are processed within 180 days.
  5. For processing of Requests for Hearings in the Energy Program:
    1. 75% of Final Decisions in Approved Claims or No-Contest Denials are issued within 75 days from issuance of the Recommended Decision.
    2. 75% of Final Decisions in Reviews of the Written Record are issued within 75 days of the Request for Review of Written Record.
    3. 75% of Final Decisions in Formal Hearings are issued within 250 days of the Request for Hearing.
  6. Through use of Periodic Roll Management, produce $122 million in cumulative first-year savings (FY 1999-2002) in the FECA program.
  7. Reduce the overall average medical service costs per case (adjusted for inflation) in the FECA program by .5% versus the FY 2000 baseline.

FY 2001:

  1. 2% reduction from the FY 2000 baseline in the average number of production days lost due to disability.
  2. Establish performance baseline and begin data collection for performance tracking.
  3. Establish a baseline by the end of FY 2001.
  4. N/A.
  5. N/A
  6. Produce $95 million in cumulative first-year savings.
  7. Reduction in the average annual cost for physical therapy and psychiatric services by 1%through focus reviews of services charged. (Note: This intermediate goal will assist the agency in developing strategies to reach the overall cost reduction goal. Reduction of overall average medical costs will be measured against a FY 2000 baseline.)

FY 2000:

  1. Reduce to 173 days (QCM cases only); establish baseline for all cases.
  2. Complete system programming for entering and generating goal-related data and establish a baseline against which to measure performance.
  3. Finalize and implement new regulations. Develop materials to provide all parties with information about the revised claims development and adjudication process.
  4. N/A
  5. N/A
  6. Produce $66 million in cumulative first-year savings.
  7. Save an additional $5 million over FY 1999 compared to amounts charged through full-year implementation of fee schedules for inpatient hospital and pharmacy services.

FY 1999:

  1. Reduce to 178 days (QCM cases only).
  2. Complete the process of defining a case resolution.
  3. Implement initial findings package designed to more effectively provide all parties with information about decisions made on individual claims.
  4. N/A
  5. N/A
  6. $19 million in first-year savings.
  7. Save 19% versus amounts billed for FECA medical service subject to fee schedules.

Results

FY 2003: The goal was substantially achieved.  Of the ten performance indicators included under this goal, targets were reached for eight.

  1. The target of 129.7 LPD for Postal Service cases was not reached.  LPD for USPS rose by 9% to 143.3 days.
  2. This target was not reached.  LPD for All Other Government Agencies rose by 2.6% to 55.2 days.
  3. This target was reached.  56 USPS employees were placed with new employers.
  4. This target was reached.  PRM produced an additional $24.6 million in first year compensation benefit savings.
  5. This target was reached.  In the last 12 months, FECA average medical treatment case costs remained stable with last year at approximately $2,500 per case, while the Milliman Health Cost Index rose by 10%.
  6. This target was reached.  DOL established baselines using FY 2003 results for five communications performance areas.
  7. This target was reached.  The average number of days to resolve disputed issues for FY 2003 was 266 days, 13 days below the goal of 279 days.
  8. This target was reached.  86.6% of claims subject to the new regulations on which district director decisions were based had no pending requests for further action one year after receipt of the claim.
  9. This target was reached.  79% of Initial Claims for benefits in the Energy program were processed within standard timeframes.
  10. This target was reached.  The overall performance result was 79.9% within standard timeframes for Final Decisions.

FY 2002:

  1. This goal was not achieved. While LPD for injury cases of the United States Postal Service rose by 11.6% to 131 days, LPD for the All Other Government Agencies was reduced by 4.6% to 53.8 days.
  2. This goal was not achieved. Resolving disputed issues required an average of 285 days.
    • As the data collection and reporting process matured, it became apparent that the baseline for this indicator did not capture the full universe of cases and was therefore invalid.
    • We believe the FY 2002 performance data to be basically sound and will, following a data review and clean-up to ensure its accuracy and completeness, use the FY 2002 result as the new baseline for FY 2003 and beyond.
    • We fully expect to meet or exceed our performance targets for FY 2003 and beyond.
  3. This goal was achieved. 89.9% of claims subject to the new regulations on which district director decisions were based had no pending requests for further action one year after receipt of the claim.
    • The extraordinary results achieved were due mostly to cohorts of re-filed and marginal cases that were subsequently withdrawn during the initial processing period under the revised regulations.
    • These cohorts should decrease or disappear during FY 2003 and beyond.
    • The program expects the reduction or elimination of these cohorts to bring performance more into line with projected targets.
  4. This goal was not achieved. The FY 2002 target for these performance indicators was 75%. Results from year-end totals showed that 48% of claims of Department of Energy (DOE) employees, or of contractors employed at DOE Facilities, were processed within 120 days, and that 48% of claims of employees of Atomic Weapons Employers and Beryllium Vendors were processed within 180 days.
  5. This goal was substantially achieved. The FY 2002 target for these performance indicators was 75%. Results from year-end totals showed that 76% of final decisions in approved claims or no-contest denials were issued within 75 days from issuance of the recommended decision, 74% of final decisions in reviews of the written record were issued within 75 days of the request for review of written record, and 100% of final decisions in formal hearings were issued within 250 days of the request for hearing.
  6. This goal was achieved. Periodic Roll Management (PRM) produced an additional $25.6 million in first-year compensation benefit savings in FY 2002, bringing cumulative total first-year savings to $122 million.
  7. This goal was not achieved. Average overall FECA medical cost per case in FY 2002 was $2,604. After adjusting for inflation using the Consumer Price Index for Medical Care, this represents a 6.8% increase compared to the average of $2,230 in FY 2000.

FY 2001:

  1. The goal was not met. The FY 2000 baseline is 68.1 days, and the FY 2001 target was 66.7. The overall government-wide average LPD was 76.9, a 15.3% increase..
  2. N/A
  3. N/A
  4. N/A
  5. N/A
  6. This goal was exceeded. PRM produced an additional $31 million in first-year savings in FY 2001, bringing cumulative total first-year savings to $103 million.
  7. The goal was not met. Average cost per case for Psychiatric services were reduced by nearly 3% over FY 2000; for Physical Therapy services, however, average cost increased by 4.5% (adjusted for inflation).
    • For Psychiatric cases, the decline in average case costs was due, in part, to application of stricter guidelines over approval of services in the FECA district offices;
    • Despite an increase in average costs for Physical Therapy cases, Focus Reviews conducted in late FY 2001 demonstrated the potential for savings in this service category: 121 of 842 high-cost cases were identified for adjustment of service limits.

FY 2000:

  1. This goal was exceeded. Average lost production days (LPD) measured for Quality Case Management cases in FY 2000 was 164 days. This represented a shortening of the average time away from work of 25 days when compared to the FY 1997 baseline year. The reduction also equated to a $17.7 million savings in compensation costs.
  2. This goal was substantially met. System programming was completed and data collected started. However, goal refinement at mid-year required extending the data collection period to a full year to ensure an inclusive baseline. The target for establishing a baseline was extended to May 2001.
  3. This goal was substantially met.
  4. N/A.
  5. N/A
  6. This goal was exceeded. Cumulative first-year savings for FY 1999-2000 were $72 million. PRM productivity remained higher than expected. One-half of all reviews in FY 2000 resulted in either an adjustment to continuing benefit amounts or a termination of benefits.
  7. This goal was exceeded. The FECA program saved $34.5 million (61% over target) using fee schedules for Inpatient and Pharmacy services. The result was due, in large part, to a 37% increase in charges for these services. This was consistent with the 32% overall increase in charges subject to fee schedules (including Outpatient Hospital and Physician charges) in FY 2000.

FY 1999:

  1. This goal was exceeded. Average lost production days for cases measured in FY 1999 was 173 days against a target of 178 days. This was nearly a 9% reduction compared to the FY 1997 baseline. The 16-day reduction compared to the FY 1997 baseline represented a savings in compensation benefits of $9.6 million for the cases measured.
  2. By September 30, a definition of “case resolution” was developed and distributed to program district directors and OWCP regional directors.
  3. The program implemented part of its revised initial findings package in July 1999. The remainder of the findings package was awaiting finalization of the new regulations.
  4. N/A
  5. N/A
  6. The goal was exceeded. PRM case review actions produced an additional $20.8 million in FECA compensation benefit savings.
  7. Both the original and revised goals were exceeded. The original goal was to save $10.67 million against amounts billed for inpatient hospital and pharmacy services subject to new fee schedules, and through specialized review for improper billings for physician/professional services. The new fee (which became effective January 1999) alone exceeded the target by 54%, and produced $16.5 million in savings. Implementation of medical bill review was delayed and the full complement of Medical Coding Specialists was not brought on board and trained until September 1999. No savings resulted from bill review.

Indicator

  1. Ratio of the total number of days lost due to workplace injuries per 100 employed Federal civilian workers for both the USPS and All other Government agencies. The measurement consists of time lost during the initial 45-day, continuation-of-pay period while the claim remains in the jurisdiction of the Federal agency employer, plus LPD within the first year of the beginning of wage-loss benefits under the FECA following COP.
  2. Ratio of the total number of days lost due to workplace injuries per 100 employed Federal civilian workers for both the USPS and All other Government agencies. The measurement consists of time lost during the initial 45-day, continuation-of-pay period while the claim remains in the jurisdiction of the Federal agency employer, plus LPD within the first year of the beginning of wage-loss benefits under the FECA following COP.
  3. The percent change in the annual number of injury case placements with a new employer through the FECA vocational rehabilitation program.
  4. The fiscal year value, on a case-by-case basis, of all reductions in periodic (28-day cycle) compensation benefit payments resulting from PRM action.
  5. The change in 12-month rolling average medical cost per case for FECA cases receiving medical services, compared to the change in the 12-month rolling average in health care costs per capita for the nationwide population.
  6. Various timeliness, quality, and volume measurements relating to service performance.
  7. The average number of days elapsed between the date a dispute is received in a Longshore case from any party and the date that the dispute is resolved.
  8. Percentage of claims filed which are subject to the new Black Lung regulations on which, following an initial eligibility decision by the district director, no requests for further proceedings (reconsideration, modification, informal conference, formal hearing) are pending one year after receipt of the claim by the program.
  9. The percentage of claims processed by the Energy Employees Compensation Program, which reach initial completion within relevant standard timeframes measured in calendar days from the date of receipt of the claim by the program to the status date indicating completion of initial processing. The standard timeframe for processing claims of Department of Energy (DOE) employees is 120 days; the standard timeframe for claims of employees of Atomic Weapons Employers (AWE), Beryllium Vendors, subcontractors at any site, and any claim sent for employment verification by the Social Security Administration is 180 days. Completion of initial processing includes: 1) Issuance of Recommended Acceptance in Radiation Exposure Compensation Act (RECA) claims; 2) Issuance of Recommended Denials; 3) Issuance of Form EE15 in non-RECA accepted claims; or 4) Referral of a claim to the National Institutes for Safety and Health.
  10. The percentage of all final Decisions issued within relevant standard timeframes as measured in calendar days from the date of either: a) the issuance of the Recommended Decision to the Final Decision in Approved Claims or no-Contests Denials; b) the receipt of the request for Review of the Written Record to the date of the Final Decision; or c) the receipt of Request for Hearing to the date of issuance of the Final Decision. The standard timeframe for processing Final Decisions in Approved Claims or No-Contest Denials is 75 days from issuance of the Recommended Decision; for Reviews of the Written Record, the standard is 75 days of the Request for Review of Written Record; and for Final Decisions in Formal Hearings, the standard is 250 days of the Request for Hearing.

FY 2002:

  1. Average number of days lost due to workplace injuries per employed Federal civilian worker. The measurement consists of time lost during the initial 45-day, continuation-of-pay period while the claim remains in the jurisdiction of the Federal agency employer, plus LPD within the first year of the beginning of wage-loss benefits under the FECA following COP.
  2. The average number of days elapsed between the date a dispute is received in a Longshore case from any party and the date that the dispute is resolved.
  3. Percentage of claims filed which are subject to the new Black Lung regulations on which no requests for further proceedings (reconsideration, modification, informal conference, formal hearing) are pending one year after receipt of the claim by the program.
  4. The percent of claims processed by the Energy Employees Compensation Program, which reach initial completion within the relevant timeframe measured in calendar days from the date of receipt of the claim by the program to the status date indicating completion of initial processing. Completion of initial processing includes: 1) Issuance of Recommended Acceptance in Radiation Exposure Compensation Act (RECA) claims; 2) Issuance of Recommended Denials; 3) Issuance of Form EE15 in non-RECA accepted claims; or 3) Referral of a claim to the National Institutes for Safety and Health.
  5. 5. The percent of all final Decisions issued within the relevant timeframe as measured in calendar days from the date of:
    1. The issuance of the Recommended Decision to the Final Decision in Approved Claims or no-Contests Denials;
    2. The receipt of the request for Review of the Written Record to the date of the Final Decision; or
    3. The receipt of Request for Hearing to the date of issuance of the Final Decision.
  6. The fiscal year amount of total periodic payment (compensation benefit) reductions in PRM universe cases.
  7. Overall average medical cost per case, after adjustment for inflation, for all cases receiving medical services.

Data Source

FY 2004 and FY 2003:

  1. Federal Employees' Compensation Act (FECA) data systems; Federal agency payroll offices; Office of Personnel Management employment statistics
  2. Federal Employees' Compensation Act (FECA) data systems; Federal agency payroll offices; Office of Personnel Management employment statistics
  3. Nurse/Rehabilitation Tracking System
  4. Periodic Roll Management System; FECA Automated Compensation Payment System.
  5. FECA Medical Bill Pay System; Milliman USA, Health Cost Index Report
  6. Telecommunications system standard reports; FECA district office and national MIS reports; customer surveys; focus group records; and other customer service performance data sources
  7. Longshore Case Management System.
  8. Black Lung Automated Support Package.
  9. Energy Program Case Management System
  10. Energy Program Case Management System

FY 2002:

  1. Federal Employees' Compensation Act (FECA) data systems; Federal agency payroll offices; Office of Personnel Management employment statistics
  2. Longshore Case Management System.
  3. Black Lung Automated Support Package.
  4. Energy Program Case Management System
  5. Energy Program Case Management System
  6. Periodic Roll Management System; FECA Automated Compensation Payment System.
  7. FECA Medical Bill Pay System.

Baseline

FY 2004:

  1. The number of days lost due to workplace injuries in FY 2003 per 100 employed Federal civilian workers by the USPS.  153.4 reflects Share recalculation.
  2. The number of days lost due to workplace injuries in FY 2003 per 100 employed Federal civilian workers by All Other Government agencies.  56 reflects Share recalculation.
  3. The number of vocational rehabilitation placements with new employer in FY 2002.
  4. The sum of periodic (28-day cycle) payments, on a case-by-case basis, made prior to reduction in benefits due to terminations or adjustments by PRM action in the fiscal year.
  5. U.S. health care costs as measured by the Milliman Health Cost Index.
  6. FY 2003 measurement of five Communications performance areas:
    • Use of FECA program electronic services – 1.7 million contacts
    • Average caller wait times – 3.3 minutes
    • Average time to return calls – 3.0 days
    • Calls resolved on the first try – 58%
    • Calls handled according to program quality standards – 88%
  7. An average of 285 days elapsed nationwide between the dispute receipt date and the dispute resolution date.*
  8. FY 2001: 66.5% of Black Lung benefit claims, following an eligibility decision by the district director, had no requests for further action from any party pending one year after receipt of the claim: developed using data collected over the past decade from claims subject to the old regulations.
  9. 75% of Initial Claims processed are timely.
  10. 75% of Final Decisions are timely.

FY 2003:

  1. The number of days lost due to workplace injuries in FY 2002 per 100 employed Federal civilian workers by the USPS.
  2. The number of days lost due to workplace injuries in FY 2001 per 100 employed Federal civilian workers by All Other Government agencies.
  3. The number of vocational rehabilitation placements with new employer in FY 2002.
  4. The sum of periodic (28-day cycle) payments, on a case-by-case basis, made prior to reduction in benefits due to terminations or adjustments by PRM action in the fiscal year.
  5. U.S. health care costs as measured by the Milliman Health Cost Index.
  6. TBD, baselines for key service areas being established in FY 2003.
  7. An average of 285 days elapsed nationwide between the dispute receipt date and the dispute resolution date.
  8. FY 2001: 66.5% of Black Lung benefit claims, following an eligibility decision by the district director, had no requests for further action from any party pending one year after receipt of the claim: developed using data collected over the past decade from claims subject to the old regulations.
  9. 75% of Initial Claims processed are timely.
  10. 75% of Final Decisions are timely.

FY 2002:

  1. Interim baseline for Quality Case Management (QCM) cases only: FY1997 actual – 189 workdays. FY 2000 baseline: 68.1 workdays.
    FY 2001 actual results will serve as new baselines: preliminary results are 119 days for USPS, and 54.1 days for All Other Agencies.
  2. An average of 232 days elapsed nationwide between the dispute receipt date and the dispute resolution date.
  3. 66.5% of Black Lung benefit claims, following an eligibility decision by the district director, had no requests for further action from any party pending one year after receipt of the claim: developed using data collected over the past decade from claims subject to the old regulations.
  4. This is a new measure for FY 2002. While target levels have been established, the actual performance results in FY 2002 will serve as the baseline for this measure.
  5. This is a new measure for FY 2002. While target levels have been established, the actual performance results in FY 2002 will serve as the baseline for this measure.
  6. For all cases with benefit actions in the measurement year, the periodic payment amount paid at time of their entry into the PRM universe, compared to the periodic payment amount after benefit reduction.
    The methodology for measuring savings from compensation benefit adjustments and terminations was revised in FY 2000 to coincide with PRM's integration into permanent operations.
    PRM savings for performance reporting were previously derived by comparing total FECA program benefit reductions in all cases, including PRM cases, in the measurement year, to total reductions produced in the baseline year but not counting PRM case reductions.
  7. Overall Average Medical Cost Baseline: Average annual cost per case in FY2000 for all cases receiving medical services.

Comment

1,2. LPD is one of several goals within the joint, OSHA/ESA Safety & Health and Return to Employment (SHARE) initiative to increase Federal (non-postal) workplace safety rates and speed recovery and return to work. To be consistent with SHARE, OWCP is readjusting the baseline year for both the Postal and all Other Government Agencies measures to FY 2003.  Consistent with requests from Federal agencies to provide more current data, OWCP is also revising how it measures LPD days in FECA wage-loss claims. Post September 11, 2001, impacts on the USPS, including overall reductions in mail volume, resulted in higher LPD for that agency and that trend is expected to be difficult to reverse. Accordingly, we believe FY 2002 is a more appropriate baseline against which to measure future performance for USPS.

5. The Milliman Health Cost Index measures the change in non-Medical health care costs per capita for the overall national population. In the early 1990's FECA medical cost increases were typically lower than the Milliman Health Cost Index, but in 1998 and throughout 2000 the FECA rolling 12 month average exceeded the Milliman Index's rate of increase. The implementation of various cost containment strategies has had significant impact in moving FECA's cost curve well below the average Milliman Index since early 2001, and this new, long-term goal of maintaining that positive relationship to the Milliman Index over time is appropriate given the progress to date.

7. Reducing the average time required to resolve disputed issues reflects increased cooperation among the parties and increased voluntary compliance with Longshore statutes and procedures. The Longshore program will work to reduce the extended hearings and appeals processes by raising the quality of medical evidence and clarity of decisions in the initial stages of the decision making process.

8. Following conclusion of Black Lung's PART review and an analysis of experience gained with this indicator in FY 2002 and FY 2003, OMB recommended that the program adjusts its FY 2004 and out year targets to ensure that they are challenging and meaningful.  Thus, the overall FY 2008 target has been adjusted from 10% to 12% above the baseline, and the years in between have been adjusted accordingly.  The program will continue to monitor performance on a quarterly basis to ensure that its targets remain appropriate.

9. OWCP refers non-Special Exposure Cohort (SEC) cancer claims to the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health NIOSH to document radiation exposure histories and dosage levels. Upon completion of the dose reconstruction, OWCP continues adjudication of the claim. “Completion of initial processing” indicates a point common to all claim categories at which the Energy program has made a determination of covered employment and covered illness. For claims other than non-SEC cancers, this determination results in a decision to award or deny claims. Beyond completion of initial processing, additional decision points reside with the claimant or NIOSH prerequisite to issuance of a formal Recommended Decision.

These timeframes and target levels may be adjusted as the Energy program builds a more complete understanding of potential workload volumes and characteristics, better assesses work flow and resource requirements, tests work processes, and determines optimal performance standards. This analysis includes understanding uncontrollable factors, such as decision points dependent upon claimant action (e.g., “no contest denials” cannot be completed until the claimant's 60-day response period has passed).

Performance Goal 2.2D

FY 2004: (1) PBGC will achieve an American Customer Satisfaction Index (ACSI) of 71 for sponsors of covered pension plans who have contacted PBGC for assistance.  (2) PBGC will achieve an ACSI of 77 for participants in trusteed plans who have contacted PBGC for assistance.

Results

FY 2003

(1) 

(2)

69 

77

Indicator

Customer satisfaction of sponsors of covered pension plans who have contacted PBGC for assistance and of participants in trusteed plans who have contacted PBGC for assistance.

Data Source

American Customer Satisfaction Index (ACSI) report.

Baseline

(1) 69 in FY 2002
(2) 73 in FY 2002

Comment

In FY 2003 PBGC revised its strategic plan to focus on customer satisfaction among its two major customer groups.  These new, outcome-oriented, citizen-centric goals replace the more output oriented FY 2003 goals for reducing processing time, promptly refunding premium payments and ensuring accuracy of benefit payments.

Outcome Goal 3.1:  Reduce Workplace Injuries, Illnesses, and Fatalities

Performance Goal 3.1A

FY 2004:  Reduce the mine industry fatal injury incidence rate by 15% from the FY 2003 baseline by FY 2008, and reduce the mine industry all-injury incidence rate 50% below the FY 2000 baseline by FY 2008. For FY 2004 this equates to a 3.2% reduction in the fatal incidence rate, and a 24.2% reduction in the all-injury incidence rate.

FY 2003: Reduce the mine industry fatal injury incidence rate by 15% per year, and reduce the mine industry all-injury incidence rate 50% below the FY 2000 baseline by the end of FY 2005. For FY 2003 this equates to a 17% reduction.

FY 2002: Reduce the number of mine fatalities by 15% and non-fatal injury incidence rate 50% over a four year period (FY 2001-2004) – in FY 2002 17% below the baseline.

FY 1999–FY 2001: Reduce the number of mine fatalities and the non-fatal injury rate to below the average for the previous five years.

Results

FY 2003: The goal was not achieved.

  • Fatal incidence rate:  Baseline is .024 Target =.020  Result = .0226
  • All-injury incidence rate: Baseline is 5.07  Target = 3.79  Result= 4.27

FY 2002: The goal was not achieved.

  • Fatalities: Baseline is 88 fatalities; Target = 64; Fatalities = 71
  • Nonfatal-days-lost incidence rate: Baseline is 3.46 NFDL incidence rate; Target = 2.87; NFDL = 3.15

FY 2001: The goal was achieved.

  • Fatalities: Average FY 1996-2000 = 89; FY 2001 = 71
  • Nonfatal-days-lost incidence rate: Average FY 1996-2000 = 3.65; FY 2001 = 3.31

FY 2000: The goal was substantially achieved.

  • Fatalities: Average FY 1995-1999 = 89; FY 2000 = 88*
  • Nonfatal-days-lost incidence rate: Average FY 1995-1999 =3.83; FY 2000 = 3.46
  • In August 2001, a fatality in FY 2000 was deemed not chargeable, thus reducing the number from 89 to 88.

FY 1999: The goal was achieved.

  • Fatalities: FY 1994–1998 Average = 92; FY 1999 = 82
  • Nonfatal-days-lost incidence rate: FY 1994–1998 Average = 4.07; FY 1999 = 3.51

Indicator

The number of mining fatalities per 200,000 hours worked and all injuries (including fatalities) per 200,000 hours.

Data Source

Mine Accident, Injury, and Employment information. Mine operators and contractors report to MSHA under Title 30 Code of Federal Regulations Part 50.

Baseline

The baseline year for the fatal incidence rate indicator is FY 2003 (.0226).  The baseline year for the all-injury incidence rate indicator is FY 2000 (5.07).

FY 2004 targets are: fatal incidence rate .0219
all-injury incidence rate 3.85

Comment

 

Performance Goal 3.1B

FY 2004: Reduce the percentage of respirable coal dust samples exceeding the applicable standards by 5% for designated occupations and reduce the percentage of silica dust samples in metal and nonmetal mines exceeding the applicable standards by 5% for high risk occupations; and reduce the percentage of noise exposures above the citation level in all mines by 5%.

FY 2003: Reduce the percentage of respirable coal dust samples exceeding the applicable standards by 5% for designated occupations in coal mines, and reduce the percentage of silica dust samples in metal and nonmetal mines exceeding the applicable standards by 5% for designated high-risk occupations.

Reduce the percentage of noise exposures above the citation level in all mines by 5%.

FY 2002: Reduce the percentage of respirable coal dust samples exceeding the applicable standards by 5% for designated occupations; reduce the percentage of silica dust samples in metal and nonmetal mines exceeding the applicable standards by 5% for high risk occupations; and reduce the percentage of noise exposures above the citation level in all mines by 5%.

FY 1999-2001: Reduce by 5% the percentage of coal dust and silica dust samples that are out of compliance for coal mines and metal and nonmetal high risk mining occupations, respectively.

Results

FY 2003:  The goal was achieved.

  • Coal Dust goal: Baseline: 15%  Target = 14.2%; Actual = 11.7
  • Silica Dust goal: Baseline: 9%  Target = 8.6%; Actual = 6.5%
  • Noise Exposures goal:  Baseline 9.3%  Target = 8.6%; Actual = 4.8%

FY 2002: The goal was not achieved.

  • Coal Dust goal: Baseline: percent of samples over the applicable standard = 15%; Target = 14.2%; Actual = 15.0% of samples are over the applicable standard.
  • Silica Dust goal: Baseline: percent of samples exceeding the applicable standards = 9.3%; Target = 8.8%; Actual = 6.6%
  • Noise Exposures goal: Baseline: percent of samples above the citation level = 9.0%; Target = 8.6%; Actual = 6.6%
  • Diesel Particulate goal: takes effect in FY 2003, as of this time no performance data is available to set a baseline for measurement of this goal.

FY 2001: The goal was achieved.

  • Coal Dust goal: 5% reduction; Target: 11.1%; Actual: 10.2% reduction
  • Silica Dust goal: <80% index points: Actual 64% index points

FY 2000: The goal was achieved.

  • Coal dust goal: 5% reduction; Target: 11.7%; actual: 11.2% reduction
  • Silica dust goal: < 85 index points; actual: 65.3 index points

FY 1999: The goal was achieved.

  • Coal dust goal: 5% reduction; actual: 11.6% reduction
  • Silica dust goal <90 index points; actual: 75.1 index points.

Indicator

Percent samples out of compliance with the respirable coal mine dust standard for designated occupations and the percent of silica dust samples for high risk occupations that are out of compliance with the metal and nonmetal mines standard. Compliance with permissible level for noise in all mines and compliance with the diesel particulate matter standards for all mines.

Data Source

Dust samples collected by MSHA inspectors. Coal Mine Safety and Health Management Information System and Metal and Nonmetal Mine Safety and Health Management Information System

Baseline

Coal dust: samples collected in FY 2002; FY 2004 target is 11.12
Silica dust: samples collected in FY 2002; FY 2004 target is 6.18
Noise: samples collected in FY 2000-2001; FY 2004 target is 4.56

Comment

Respirable dust, silica, and noise exposures are major health hazards to miners. Prevention of pneumoconiosis (black lung disease), silicosis, hearing loss and diesel particulate exposure is a priority health initiative.

Performance Goal 3.1C

FY 2004: Reduce the rate of workplace fatalities by 15 % by FY 2008.  For FY 2004, reduce the rate of workplace fatalities by 3%.*

Results

FY 2003: The goal to reduce occupational fatalities by 2% from baseline was not achieved.  The fatality rate declined to 1.61.

Indicator

Percent change in the rate of fatalities per 100,000 workers. **

Data Source

OSHA Integrated Management Information System (IMIS)
Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) Current Employment Statistics (CES)

Baseline

FY 2000 – FY 2002 rate of 1.62 OSHA inspected fatalities per 100,000 workers.

Comment

* This new strategic goal is to reduce the rate of OSHA inspected fatalities by a total of 15% from FY 2003 to FY 2008. The rate will be calculated as a three-year moving average to reduce fluctuations in order to highlight trends.

** Rate is calculated using the number of OSHA inspected fatalities recorded in IMIS divided by employment (BLS CES) per 100,000 workers.

Performance Goal 3.1D

FY 2004: Reduce the rate of workplace injuries and illnesses by 20 % by FY 2008.  For FY2004, reduce the rate of workplace injuries and illnesses by 4%.*

Results

FY 2003: The goal is to reduce injuries and illnesses by 2% from baseline.  Results will be available in December 2004. *

Indicator

Percent change in the days away from work case rate per 100 workers.

Data Source

Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) Annual Survey of Occupational Injuries and Illnesses (ASOII)

Baseline

CY 2002: 1.6

Comment

* This new strategic goal is to reduce the total rate of days away from work cases by 20% from FY 2003 – FY 2008. CY 2003 data will be available December 2004.

Outcome Goal 3.2:  Foster Equal Opportunity Workplaces

Performance Goal 3.2A

FY 2004: Federal contractors achieve equal opportunity workplaces as indicated by:

  • Reducing the incidence of discrimination among Federal contractors to 9 percent.
  • Increasing compliance among Federal contractors in all other respects of equal opportunity workplace standards to 61 percent.

FY 2003: Federal contractors achieve equal opportunity workplaces as indicated by:

  • Reducing the incidence of discrimination among Federal contractors to 9%.
  • Increasing compliance among Federal contractors in all other respects of equal opportunity workplace standards to 59%.

FY 2002: Federal contractors achieve equal opportunity workplaces as indicated by:

  1. Improving the equal employment opportunity performance of federal contractors and subcontractors within industries where data indicate the likelihood of equal employment opportunity problems is greatest. In FY 2002, contractors in SIC Group 50 and SIC Group 87 that participate in specified DOL/OFCCP compliance assistance activities and are subsequently evaluated will have:
    • Better EEO performance in selection system evaluations as indicated by less severe Case Management Systems (CMS) closure types than contractors in SIC Groups 50 and 87 that did not participate in specified DOL/OFCCP compliance assistance activities. In FY 2002, DOL/OFCCP will improve by 1% the rate of compliance findings over the baseline for SIC 50 and SIC 87.
    • Better EEO performance in selection system evaluations as indicated by less severe violations or deficiencies than contractors in SIC Groups 50 and 87 that did not participate in specified DOL/OFCCP compliance assistance activities. In FY 2002, DOL/OFCCP will reduce by 1% the rate of findings of severe violations from the baseline for SIC 50 and SIC 87.
    • Better EEO performance in selection system evaluations as indicated by evaluation type than contractors in SIC Groups 50 and 87 that did not participate in specified DOL/OFCCP compliance assistance activities. In FY 2002, DOL/OFCCP will increase by 1% the rate of focused and offsite compliance evaluation types over the baseline for SIC 50 and SIC 87.
  2. Improving the equal employment opportunity performance of federal contractors and subcontractors that have had prior contact with DOL/OFCCP through evaluations, outreach, or technical assistance. In FY2002, contractors and subcontractors that are selected for evaluation, outreach, or compliance assistance activities will have:
    • Better EEO performance in selection system evaluations as indicated by less severe CMS closure types than contractors that did not have prior contact with DOL/OFCCP. In FY 2002 DOL/OFCCP will improve by 1% the rate of compliance findings over the baseline for all supply and service closures.
    • Better EEO performance in selection system evaluations as indicated by less severe violations or deficiencies than contractors that did not have prior contact with DOL/OFCCP. In FY 2002 DOL/OFCCP will reduce by 1% the rate of findings of severe violations from the baseline.
    • Better EEO performance in selection system evaluations as indicated by evaluation type than contractors that did not have prior contact with DOL/OFCCP. In FY 2002 DOL/OFCCP will increase by 1% the rate of focused and offsite compliance evaluation types over the baseline.

FY 2001: Identify those industries where data indicate the likelihood of equal employment opportunity problems is greatest and establish baselines; establish baselines for contractors and subcontractors that have had prior contact with DOL/OFCCP through evaluations, outreach or technical assistance; and establish baselines for reducing compensation discrimination by federal contractors and subcontractors.

FY 1999 - 2000: N/A.

Results

FY 2002: The goal was achieved. The Department fully achieved all six indicators measuring improvements in the industries with the greatest likelihood of equal opportunity problems, and the three indicators measuring improvements by contractors and subcontractors previously contacted.

FY 2001: The goal was not achieved.

For the first indicator, two industries were identified where the data indicate the likelihood of equal employment opportunity problems is greatest, and baselines indicating the extent of problems previously found were established. With regard to the second indicator, OFCCP established a baseline for Federal contractors and subcontractors that had failed previous compliance evaluations, but not for those contacted only through outreach or technical assistance. OFCCP did not develop a separate baseline for compensation discrimination, but included this issue in the baselines created for the preceding two indicators.

FY 1999 - 2000: N/A.

Indicator

Trends/changes in compliance and violation rates and EEO-1 data. Trends/changes in data gathered from evaluations and from Federal contractors.

Data Source

EEO-1 data file; Case Management System (CMS) Completions Data; Federal contractors' data; and compliance evaluation results of scheduled contractors

Baseline

FY 2002 and FY 2001:

  1. In FY 2001, the incidence of serious violations indicating discrimination among evaluated contractors reported in CMS measured 12.5%.
  2. In FY 2001, compliance among evaluated contractors in all other respects of equal opportunity workplace standards (i.e., performance under plan, EEO policies, record keeping and support data, and failure to develop AAP) reported in CMS measured 57%.

Comment

DOL/OFCCP is exploring ways to improve its selection and investigation techniques to improve efficiency in identifying non-compliant contractors. The improved selection and investigation process will have a significant impact on compliance findings. In addition, in order to ensure data integrity in CMS, DOL/OFCCP will audit the system to identify problem areas and make numerical adjustments as appropriate. Through compliance assistance and other contacts, such as compliance evaluations, DOL/OFCCP plans to continue educating members of contractor community on compliance techniques, thereby reducing the proportion and severity of noncompliance determinations. Should ESA/OFCCP's compliance assistance activities prove as effective as anticipated, ESA plans to expand its compliance assistance efforts by reaching more employers in its contractor universe in FY 2004.

Performance Goal 3.2B

FY 2004: States that receive financial assistance under the Workforce Investment Act provide benefits and services to persons with disabilities in a non-discriminatory manner.

FY 2003: States that receive financial assistance under the Workforce Investment Act provide benefits and services in a non-discriminatory manner, as evidenced by: (a) the reduction in the number of allegations of disparate impact on the basis of disability; and, (b) the decrease in the number of disparate treatment claims filed on the basis of disability.

FY 1999 – 2002: N/A

Results

FY 1999 – 2002: N/A

Indicator

FY 2004:

  • Desk reviews conducted of a representative sample of States using the WIA Section 188 Disability Checklist.
  • Initiate technical assistance reviews of the One-Stop Career systems in the cities of Los Angeles, CA and Houston, TX.
  • The nature and number of discrimination complaints filed nationwide under Title I of the WIA, Wagner-Peyser Act funded programs, the Unemployment Insurance program, and against DOL-operated Job Corps Centers based on a longitudinal study spanning FY 2002 through FY 2005.

FY 2003:

  • Technical assistance reviews conducted of a representative sample of One-Stop Centers in the One-Stop systems of the cities of New York City and Miami.
  • The nature and number of discrimination complained filed nationwide under Title I of the WIA, Wagner-Peyser Act, Unemployment Insurance, and against DOL-operated Job Corps Centers based on a longitudinal study conducted in FY 2003 and spanning FY 2002 through FY 2004.
  • Specialized Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR) training for the State of New York's mediators and Equal Opportunity representatives conducted in FY 2003.

Data Source

CRC Complaint management information system.
WIA Section 188 Disability Checklist responses.
Complaint log database of State/local reported discrimination complaints files.

Baseline

  • FY 2003 complaint log data.
  • FY 2004 baseline for Houston and Los Angeles to be determined.
  • FY 2004 baseline for desk reviews to be determined.

Comments

The WIA Section 188 Disability Checklist was developed by CRC, ODEP, and ETA to create a tool that could be used to measure and ensure nondiscrimination and equal opportunity to persons with disabilities participating in programs and activities within the WIA One-Stop Career system.  The Checklist identifies the Federal requirements relating to serving persons with disabilities and has been distributed to all States.

Performance Goal 3.2C

FY 2004: Reduce employer-employee employment issues originating from service members' military     obligations conflicting with their civilian employment.

  • Establish a baseline of key problem areas for reduction in USERRA cases filed by veterans or service members

FY 2003-1999: N/A   New goal in FY 2004.

Results

NA

Indicator

Indicators will be established to target reductions in USERRA compliance problems that are most severe and pervasive based on survey of veterans and service members covered by USERRA.

Data Source

VETS' data reports

Baseline

First survey to be conducted in FY 2004, baseline established in FY 2004

Outcome Goal 3.3:Reduce Exploitation of Child Labor; Protect the Basic Rights of
Workers, and Strengthen Labor Markets

Performance Goal 3.3A

FY 2004: Contribute to the Elimination of the Worst Forms of Child Labor Internationally.

FY 2001 - 2003: Reduce exploitative child labor by promoting international efforts and targeting focused initiatives in selected countries.

FY 2000: Progressively reduce exploitative child labor worldwide by increasing international support and funding the most promising programs and projects in targeted countries.

FY 1999: N/A

Results

FY 2003: The goal was achieved.

  1. 79,769 children have been prevented or removed from child labor, particularly its worst forms, through the provision of education or training opportunities in on-going DOL-funded programs.
  2. 20 action plans, policies or programs were established that combat child labor and/or promote access to education for child laborers or children at-risk
  3. 8 Child Labor Education Initiative projects have established a baseline for education targets (enrollment and retention rates).
  4. 83,682 children were targeted for prevention or removal from child labor, particularly its worst forms, through the provision of education or training opportunities in new DOL-funded programs.
  5. Child Labor Education Initiative projects have began in 10 new countries.

FY 2002:  The goal was fully achieved. 

  1. 29 countries ratified Convention No. 182 on the Worst Forms of Child Labor; of which 10 were participating in USDOL funded IPEC projects.
  2. 13 countries adopted 15 action plans to combat child labor and/or promote access to basic education for child laborers or children at risk.
  3. 103,772 children were targeted for prevention and removal of exploitative work through the funding on new DOL/IPEC programs.
  4. 51,922 children have been prevented or removed from exploitative work through the provision of education or training opportunities in ongoing DOL-IPEC programs.
  5. Education projects were funded in 9 countries, through DOL's Child Labor Education Initiative.

FY 2001: The goal was not fully achieved.   Of the indicators 2 were exceeded, a third was substantially achieved and a fourth was not met.

FY 2000: The goal was achieved.

FY 1999: N/A

Indicator

FY 2004:

  1. Number of children prevented or withdrawn from child labor and provided education or training opportunities by DOL-IPEC programs.  Target = 70,000 children.
  2. Number of countries with increased capacities to address child labor as a result of DOL-IPEC programs funded in prior fiscal years. Target= 15 countries.
  3. Number of Child Labor Education projects that establish targets for education retention and completion rates in project areas.  Target= 8 projects.
  4. Number of Child Labor Education Initiative projects that establish baseline for rate of enrollment and drop out for targeted children.  Target=7 projects.

FY 2003:

  1. Number of children in developing countries targeted for prevention and/or removal from child labor, particularly its worst forms (as defined in ILO Convention 182), through the funding of new DOL-IPEC programs. Target= 40,000.
  2. Number of children in developing countries prevented or removed from exploitative work through the implementation of ongoing DOL-IPEC programs. Target= 60,000.
  3. Number of action plans, policies or programs established that combat child labor and/or promote access to basic education for child laborers or children at risk.  Target=15.
  4. Number of Child Labor Education Initiative projects that establish baseline for education targets.  Target=6.
  5. Number of new countries where Child Labor Education Initiative projects begin.  Target=9.

FY 2002:

  1. 8 countries will ratify International Labor Organization (ILO) Convention 182 on Worst Forms of Child Labor.
  2. 7 countries will establish National Action Plans.
  3. 100,000 children in developing countries will be targeted for prevention and/or removal from exploitative work and placed in educational settings.
  4. 50,000 children in developing countries will be prevented and/or removed from exploitative work.
  5. 70% of children removed from child labor will be placed in educational settings.
  6. Establish baseline for a rate of retention for children placed in educational settings.

FY 2001:

  1. 25 countries will ratify International Labor Organization (ILO) Convention 182 on Worst Forms of Child Labor.
  2. 15 countries will establish new national plans to eliminate child labor.
  3. 100,000 children in developing countries will be targeted for prevention and/or removal from exploitative work.
  4. 50,000 children will be prevented from starting and/or removed from exploitative work.

Data Source

ILO-IPEC and DOL/ILAB

Baseline

Baseline information collected through the IPEC projects is used to establish target populations and measure future progress. For FY 2004 projects, baseline information was made available in October 2003.

Comments

N/A

Performance Goal 3.3B

FY 2004:  Improve Living Standards and Conditions of Work Internationally.

FY 2003: Improved living standards and conditions of work for workers in developing and transition countries.

FY 2002: Advance workers' protections and economic status in developing countries.

FY 2001: Raise workers' protection and the safety of workplaces in selected countries by improving core labor standards and social safety net programs.

FY 2000: Raise workers' protection and the safety of workplaces in selected countries by improving core labor standards and social safety net programs.

FY 1999: N/A

Results

FY 2003: The goal was achieved.  The Department established baselines for all four indicators in areas that would help measure the impact of DOL-funded projects.

FY 2002:  The goal was fully achieved.  Stakeholders in approximately 41 countries and territories made commitments to implement new projects designed to implement and promote core labor standards or to expand already-existing ones.  Stakeholders In approximately 49 countries and territories made commitments to implement new projects designed to improve economic opportunities and income security for workers or to expand already existing ones.

FY 2001: The goal was achieved as both performance indicators were met.

FY 2000: The goal was substantially achieved.

FY 1999: N/A

Indicator

FY 2004:

  1. Number and percent of relevant government officials and members and officials of workers' and employers' organizations who are influential in determining living standards and working conditions and participating in USDOL project activities, who consider the project to have improved their conditions of work. Target: Collection of 2 data points and analysis of project trends.
  2. Number and percent of individuals whose economic situation has benefited from USDOL project assistance.   Target:  Collection of 2 data points and analysis of project trends.
  3. Number and percent of workplaces exposed to USDOL project assistance that have implemented new measures to prevent workplace accidents and illnesses.  Target: Collection of 2 data points and analysis of project trends.
  4. Number of workers participating in pension funds that are government regulated by project partner agencies.  Target: Collection of 2 data points and analysis of project trends.
  5. Number of new countries where HIV/AIDS workplace education projects begin.  Target=3

FY 2003:

 Number and percent of relevant government officials and members and officials of workers' and employers' organizations who are influential in determining living standards and working conditions and participating in USDOL project activities, who consider the project to have improved their conditions of work. Target: Collection of 2 data points and analysis of project trends.

Number and percent of individuals whose economic situation has benefited from USDOL project assistance. Target: Collection of 2 data points and analysis of project trends.

Number and percent of workplaces exposed to USDOL project assistance that have implemented new measures to prevent workplace accidents and illnesses. Target: Collection of 2 data points.

Number of workers participating in pension funds that are government regulated by project partner agencies.  Target Collection of 2 data points.

FY 2002:

7 countries commit to undertake improvements in assuring compliance and implementation of core labor standards.

Project countries will commit with US/DOL assistance to make substantive improvements in raising income levels of working families.

FY 2001:

Fifteen countries receive US financial support and commit to core labor standards.

Two initiatives to effect policy changes in other Nations will yield judicial, legal, or significant policy decisions which improve core labor standards.
Eight project countries commit with USA/DOL assistance make substantive improvements in social safety programs that protect workers and develop labor markets.

Data Source

ILO Reports; reports by government, contractors, grantees, and nongovernmental organizations; surveys

Baseline

For FY2004, baseline indicators will be collected by September 30, 2003.

Comment

N/A

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