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Secretary of Labor Thomas E. Perez
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FY 2004 Annual Performance Plan

Appendix A.  FY 2004 Performance Goals, Indicators and Baselines

Outcome Goal 1.1:  Increase Employment, Earnings and Assistance

Performance Goal 1.1A

PY 2004: Increase the employment, retention, and earnings of individuals registered under the Workforce Investment Act adult program.

PY 2000 – 2003: Same as PY 2004
PY 1999: N/A

Results

PY 2002: The goal was not achieved.  74% of those registered for the WIA Adult program were employed in the first quarter after program exit; 84% of those employed in the first quarter after program exit were still employed in the third quarter after program exit.  The average earnings increase was $2,900 for those employed in the third quarter after program exit.

PY 2001: The goal was achieved. 78.9% were employed in the third quarter after program exit (the target was 78%) with increased average earnings of $3,555 (the target was $3,361).

PY 2000: The goal was met, based on Workforce Investment Act Quarterly Performance Reports. Of those registered under the Workforce Investment Act adult program and employed in the first quarter after exit, 78% were employed in the third quarter after program exit, with increased average earnings of $3,684.

PY 1999: N/A

Indicator

PY 2004:

  • 72% of individuals registered who are not employed at registration will be employed in the first quarter after program exit;
  • 83% of those employed after program exit will be employed in the second quarter and in the third quarters after program exit;
  • The earnings of individuals will increase by an average (percentage to be determined based on analysis during 2004) between the period of one quarter prior to registration and the first quarter after program exit and by an average (percentage to be determined based on analysis during 2004) between the first and third quarters after program exit.

PY 2003:

  • 71% will be employed in the first quarter after program exit;
  • 82% of those employed in the first quarter after program exit will be employed in the third quarter after program exit; and
  • The average earnings change will be $3,100 for those who are employed in the first quarter after program exit and are still employed in the third quarter after program exit.

PY 2002:

  • 70% will be employed in the first quarter after program exit;
  • 80% of those employed in the first quarter after program exit will be employed in the third quarter after program exit; and
  • The average earnings change will be $3,423 for those who are employed in the first quarter after program exit and are still employed in the third quarter after program exit.

PY 2001:

Of those registered under the Workforce Investment Act (WIA) adult program, 78% will be employed in the third quarter after program exit, with increased average earnings of $3,361.

PY 2000:

  • 67% will be employed in the first quarter after program exit;
  • 77% of those employed in the first quarter after program exit will be employed in the third quarter after program exit; and
  • The average earnings change will be $3,264 for those who are employed in the first quarter after program exit and are still employed in the third quarter after program exit.

PY 1999: N/A

Data Source

Quarterly State WIA Performance Reports included in the Enterprise Information Management System (EIMS); Unemployment Insurance Wage Records

Baseline

There is no prior experience with this Workforce Investment Act indicator, which is based on the use of Unemployment Insurance wage records. DOL proposes to implement the new common performance measures for federal job training and employment programs in support of the President's Management Agenda. The proposed definitions for the entered employment, retention and earnings measures vary from the current definitions; thus, new baselines for these measures will need to be established. The cost per registrant is a new measure and targets will be established and revised as baseline data collection processes are created and approved through the Paperwork Reduction Act and as data become available.

Comment

Definitions for the new common measures will probably affect the proposed targets for the exiting employment, retention and earnings measures. In most cases the level of performance will vary from prior performance due to the new method in which the measures are calculated and may appear to be lower. Once baseline data are available, these targets will need to be reviewed and revised.

Performance Goal 1.1B

PY 2004: Improve the outcomes for job seekers and employers who receive public labor exchange services.

PY 1999 – 2003: Same as 2004.

Results

PY 2002: The goal was not achieved. 

  • Due to the transition to a new measurement and reporting system, ETA will not have a full set of nation-wide employment and retention data until next year.  Beginning in FY 2004, States will be reporting to DOL the entered employment data for registrants served in the first quarter of PY 2002.  Out data for registrants served in the other quarters of PY 2002 will be reported in subsequent quarterly reports. 
  • 10.2 million openings were listed with the public labor exchange: 6.1 million job openings were listed with the State Workforce Agencies and 4.1 million job openings were posted directly on America's Job Bank.

PY 2001: The six-month retention rate was not measured.

  • The Employment Service will not begin collecting data until PY 2002 due to delays in implementing the new Labor Exchange Performance Measurement System.
  • The number of job openings listed increased by 8%, as a opposed to a target of 10%, 11.8 million openings were listed with the public labor exchange in PY 2001; 7.12 million were listed with State Workforce Agencies and 4.6 million job openings were posted directly on America's Job Bank.

PY 2000: Achieved for all indicators:

  • 3.9 million (25%) of job seekers who received labor exchange services entered employment;
  • The number of job openings listed increased by 26.5% over Program Year 1999, including 6.9 million with State Workforce Agencies and 5.4 million with America's Job Bank; and
  • 66,563 new employers registered with America's Job Bank.

PY 1999: Achieved for all indicators

Indicator

PY 2004:

  • 58%* of individuals who are not employed at registration will be employed in the first quarter after program exit;
  • 72%* of those employed in the first quarter after program exit will be employed in the second and in the third quarters after program exit;
  • The earnings of individuals will increase by an average by (percentage to be determined based on analysis during 2004) % between the period of one quarter prior to registration and the first quarter after program exit and by an average (percentage to be determined based on analysis during 2004) % between the first and third quarters after program exit.

PY 2003:

  • 58% of job seekers registered with the public labor exchange will enter employment with a new employer by the end of the second quarter following registration; and
  • 72% of job seekers will continue to be employed two quarters after initial entry into employment with a new employer;
  • The number of job openings listed with the public labor exchange (with both State Workforce Agencies and America's Job Bank) will increase by 1 percent over the total for PY 2002, as adjusted for economic fluctuations;
  • The number of job searches conducted by job seekers from America's Job Bank will be collected to determine a baseline for setting future performance targets; and
  • The number of resume searches conducted by employers from America's Job Bank will be collected to determine a baseline for setting future performance targets.

PY 2002:

  • 55%* of job seekers registered with the public labor exchange will enter employment with a new employer by the end of the second quarter following registration;
  • 70%* of job seekers will continue to be employed two quarters after initial entry into employment with a new employer; and
  • The number of job openings listed with the public labor exchange (with both SWA's and AJB) will be at least the number obtained by PY 2001.

PY 2001:

  • 76% of job seekers registered by the Wagner-Peyser Act funding stream will have unsubsidized jobs six months after initial entry into employment; and

PY 2000:

  • Increase by 1 percentage point the share of applicants who receive labor exchange services that enter employment, resulting in more than 3.2 million Employment Service applicants entering employment;
  • Increase by 15%, the total number of job openings listed with the public employment service, including both those listed with State Employment Security Agencies (SESA's) and those listed directly with America's Job Bank (AJB) via the Internet; and
  • Increase the number of new employers registered with America's Job Bank from 51,000 to 60,000.

PY 1999:

  • Increase by 1 percentage point the share of applicants who receive labor exchange services that enter employment; and
  • Increase by 20%, the total number of job openings listed with the public employment service, including both those listed with State Employment Security Agencies (SESA's) and those listed directly with America's Job Bank (AJB) via the Internet.

*See Comment below.

Data Source

State reports, Unemployment Insurance wage records, and America's Job Bank Center Reports.  Quarterly State WIA Performance Reports included in the Enterprise Information Management System (EIMS) and Unemployment Insurance Records.

Baseline

  • New Labor Exchange Performance Measures became fully effective in PY 2002. Outcome for participants served in PY 2002 but reported to DFOL in PY 2003 will serve as baselines.
  • DOL will implement the new common measures in support of the President's Management Agenda. The definition for the entered employment, measure varies from the current definition; thus, a new baseline for this measure will need to be established. The retention, earnings and cost per registrant are new measures and targets will be established and revised as baseline data collection processes are created and approved through the Paperwork Reduction Act and as data becomes available. Baseline data do not exist for the proposed retention, earnings gain or cost indicators.

Comment

Definitions for the new common measures will probably affect the proposed targets for the exiting employment, retention and earnings measures. In most cases the level of performance will vary from prior performance due to the new method in which the measures are calculated and may appear to be lower. Once baseline data are available, these targets will need to be reviewed and revised.

Performance Goal 1.1C

FY 2004: Strengthen the registered apprenticeship system to meet the training needs of business and workers in the 21st Century.

FY 1999 – 2003: N/A

Results

FY 2003: The goal was substantially achieved.

  • Number of new apprentices:  130,615
  • Number of new programs in new and emerging industries: 359
  • Number of new apprenticeship programs:  Discontinued-FY 2003*
  • Number of new businesses involved in apprenticeship:
          Discontinued-FY 2003*

FY 2002:  This goal was achieved. 

  • The number of new registered apprenticeship programs increased to 2,952, an increase of 75% over the established baseline.
  • The number of new businesses involved in apprenticeship increased to 5,883, an increase of 99% over the established baseline. 
  • The number of new apprentices increased to 129,388, an increase of 64% over the baseline. 
  • The number of new programs in new and emerging industries – at a minimum Information Technology, Health Care and Social Services – increased to 326, an increase of 23% over the baseline.

Indicator

FY 2004

  • Increase the number of new programs in new and emerging industries from FY 2003 result of 359 to 366; and
  • Increase the number of new apprentices registered by OATELS staff from FY 2003 target of 67,401 to 68,592.

FY 2003

  • Increase the number of new apprentices over the established baseline from 78,770 to 133,909; and
  • Increase the number of new programs in new and emerging industries – at minimum Information Technology, Health Care and Social Services – over the established baseline from 266 to 359.

FY 2002:

  • Increase the number of new apprenticeship programs over the established baseline by 10%;
  • Increase the number of new businesses involved in apprenticeship over the established baseline by 10%;
  • Increase the number of new apprentices over the established baseline by 10%; and
  • Increase the number of new programs in new and emerging industries – at minimum Information Technology, Health Care and Social Services – over the established baseline by 10%.

Data Source

Registered Apprenticeship Information System (RAIS) established February 2002. Apprenticeship Information Management System (AIMS)

Baseline

DOL established the baseline for each of the following indicators using the average of FYs 1999, 2000 and 2001 data:

  • New apprenticeship programs:  1,685
  • New businesses involved in apprenticeship:  2,953
  • New apprentices:  78,770
  • New programs in new and emerging industries:  266

Comment

The baseline and FY 2002 and FY 2003 results for the number of new apprentices include those registered by State Apprenticeship Councils and OATELS staff.  Beginning in FY 2004, the target for this performance indicator will only include OATELS staff.  The High Growth Job Training Industries Initiative includes the following industries:  Health Services, Information Technology (IT) and IT Business-Related Services, Biotechnology, Geospatial Technology, Automotive, Retail Trade, High-Tech Manufacturing, Construction, Transportation, Energy, Financial Services, Hospitality, and Aerospace.

Performance Goal 1.1D

FY 2004: To provide national leadership to increase access and employment opportunities for youth and adults with disabilities receiving employment, training, and employment support services by developing, testing, and disseminating effective practices:

Results

This is a new goal in FY 2004.

Indicator

  • Increase by 5% the number of people with disabilities served through ODEP projects.
  • Increase by 5% the entered employment rate at pilot sites.
  • Increase by 10% the 3-month and 6-month retention rates for people with disabilities served by the pilots.
    • Increase by 10% effective practices identified through pilot project sites and other research-related initiatives.

Data Source

Program data from pilot locations

Baseline

Targets may be adjusted in consideration of baseline data captured in FY 2003.

Performance Goal 1.1E

FY 2004: Improve the employment outcomes for veterans who receive public labor exchange services and veterans program services

FY 2003: Same as FY 2002.
FY 1999 – 2001: N/A

Results

FY 2003:  The two indicators for veteran job seekers within the labor exchange goal were not measured.  A major transition was underway during FY 2003 to a new system of measuring and reporting the outcomes of public labor exchange services for veterans.  Performance in response to the FY 2003 goal will be treated in the FY 2004 Annual Performance and Accountability Report.

FY 2003:  The HVRP goal was met.  During FY 2003, 60.3% of the homeless veteran participants served by HVRP grantees successfully entered employment, so the single HVRP entry to employment indicator was achieved.

FY 2002: The single indicator for veteran jobseekers within the labor exchange goal was achieved.   The entered employment rate for veterans assisted by the public employment service system was 42.84%.

FY 2002:  The HVRP goal was not met. The FY 2002 result for the HVRP entered employment rate indicator was 54.4%, exceeding the target of 54%.  However, the baseline for the HVRP retention indicator was not established, so the second indicator was not achieved.

FY 1999 – 2001: N/A

Indicator

FY 2004:

  • *58% of veteran job seekers will be employed in the first or second quarter following registration.
  • *72% of veteran job seekers will continue to be employed two quarters after initial entry into employment with a new employer.
  • *52% of disabled veterans will enter employment
  • 55% of homeless veterans enrolled in homeless veterans reintegration programs will enter employment
  • 55% of homeless veterans will continue to be employed six months after entering employment.

FY 2003:

  • 58% of veteran job seekers will be employed in the first or second quarter following registration
  • 72%* of veteran job seekers will continue to be employed two quarters after initial entry into employment with a new employer.
  • At least 54.5% of veterans enrolled in Homeless Veterans' Reintegration Project (HVRP) grants enter employment.

FY 2002:

  • * 34% of veteran job seekers will be employed in the first or second quarter following registration
  • 54% of homeless veterans enrolled in HVRP enter employment.  A baseline retention rate will be established.

Data Source

State reports and UI wage records and homeless veteran grantee reports.  Quarterly State Performance Reports included in the Enterprise Information Management System (EIMS) and Unemployment Insurance Records.

Baseline

During FY 2002 and FY 2003, DOL will transition to a new Labor Exchange Performance Measurement system. Because there is no comparable baseline, these measures will be regularly reviewed for appropriateness and rigor as performance data become available. A baseline will be established for the entered employment rate and retention rate goals based on FY 2002 and FY 2003 results. Baseline data currently do not exist for the veteran job seeker entered employment and employment retention goals. For homeless veterans programs, the baseline of 51% was established in FY 2001.

Comment

*DOL is undergoing a transition to a new labor exchange performance measurement system. Performance indicators shown are estimates that will be revised when baseline data become available.

Performance Goal 1.1F

PY 2004: Increase the employment, retention, and earnings replacement of individuals registered under the Workforce Investment Act dislocated worker program.

PY 2000 – 2003: Same as PY 2004.
PY 1999: N/A

Results

PY 2002: This goal was not achieved.

  • Entered employment rate: 82%
  • Employment retention rate: 90%
  • Earnings replacement rate: 90%

PY 2001:  The goal was achieved.

  • Entered employment rate: 79.2%
  • Employment retention rate: 87%
  • Earnings replacement rate: 101.3%

PY 2000: The goal was achieved.

  • Entered employment rate: 75%
  • Employment retention rate: 83%
  • Earnings replacement rate: 95%

PY 1999: N/A

Indicator

PY 2004:

  • 79% of individuals registered who are not employed at registration will be employed in the first quarter after program exit;
  • 89% of those employed in the first quarter after program exit will be employed in the second and in the third quarters after program exit;
  • The earnings of individuals who are registered will increase by an average (percentage to be determined based on analysis during 2004) %* between the period of one quarter prior to registration and the first quarter after program exit and by an average by (percentage to be determined based on analysis during 2004) %* between the first and third quarters after program exit.

PY 2003:

  • 78% will be employed in the first quarter after program exit.
  • 88% of those employed in the first quarter after program exit will be employed in the third quarter after program exit; and
  • Those who are employed in the first quarter after program exit and are still employed in the third quarter after program exit will have 93% of their pre-dislocation earnings.

PY 2002:

  • 78% will be employed in the first quarter after program exit.
  • 88% of those employed in the first quarter after program exit will be employed in the third quarter after program exit; and
  • Those who are employed in the first quarter after program exit and are still employed in the third quarter after program exit will have 98% of their pre-dislocation earnings.

PY 2001:

  • 73% will be employed in the first quarter after program exit.
  • 83% of those employed in the first quarter after program exit will be employed in the third quarter after program exit; and
  • Those who are employed in the first quarter after program exit and are still employed in the third quarter after program exit will have 91% of their pre-dislocation earnings.

PY 2000:

  • 71% will be employed in the first quarter after program exit.
  • 82% of those employed in the first quarter after program exit will be employed in the third quarter after program exit; and
  • Those who are employed in the first quarter after program exit and are still employed in the third quarter after program exit will have 90% of their pre-dislocation earnings.

Data Source

Quarterly State WIA Reports included in the Enterprise Information Management System (EIMS); Unemployment Insurance Wage Records.

Baseline

There is no prior experience with these Workforce Investment Act indicators, which are based on the use of Unemployment Insurance wage records. Program Year 2000, the first full year of Workforce Investment Act implementation, constitutes the baseline year for these measures. The performance measures are derived from the agreed upon levels of performance for all States. These measures will be regularly reviewed for appropriateness and rigor as performance data becomes available.

DOL will implement the new common measures in support of the President's Management Agenda. The definitions for the entered employment, retention and earnings measures vary from the current definitions; thus, a new baseline for this measure will need to be established. The cost per registrant is a new measure and a target will be established and revised as baseline data collection processes are created and approved through the Paperwork Reduction Act and as data become available. Baseline data do not exist for the proposed cost indicators.

Comment

Definitions for the new common measures will probably affect the proposed targets for the exiting employment, retention and earnings measures. In most cases the level of performance will vary from prior performance due to the new method in which the measures are calculated and may appear to be lower. Once baseline data are available, these targets will need to be reviewed and revised.

Performance Goal 1.1G

FY 2004: Increase the employment, retention, and earnings replacement of workers dislocated in important part because of trade and who receive trade adjustment assistance benefits.

FY 2001 – 2003: Same as FY 2004.
FY 1999 – 2000: N/A

Results

FY 2003: The goal was not achieved.

  • 62% employed in the first quarter after exit;
  • 84% of those still employed in the third quarter after exit; and
  • 75% wage replacement for the second and third quarters after exit.

FY 2002:  The goal was not achieved.

  • 66% employed in the first quarter after exit;
  • 89% of those still employed in the third quarter after exit; and
  • 80% wage replacement for the second and third quarters after exit.

FY 2001: The goal was substantially achieved. 

  • 65% employed in the first quarter after exit;
  • 90% of those still employed in the third quarter after exit; and
  • 85% pre-dislocation wages

FY 1999 - 2000: N/A

Indicator

FY 2004:

  • 70% will be employed in the first quarter after program exit;
  • 88% of those employed in the first quarter after program exit will be employed in the third quarter after program exit; and
  • Those who are employed in the third quarter after program exit will earn, on average, 90% of their pre separation earnings. 

FY 2003:

  • 78% will be employed in the first quarter after program exit;
  • 88% of those employed in the first quarter after program exit will be employed in the third quarter after program exit; and
  • Those who are employed in the third quarter after program exit will earn, on average, 90% of their pre-separation earnings.

FY 2002:

  • 78% will be employed in the first quarter after program exit;
  • 88% of those employed in the first quarter after program exit will be employed in the third quarter after program exit; and
  • Those who are employed in the third quarter after program exit will earn, on average, 90% of their pre-separation earnings.

FY 2001:

  • 73% will be employed in the first quarter after program exit;
  • 80% of those employed in the first quarter after program exit will be employed in the third quarter after program exit; and
  • Those who are employed in the first quarter after program exit and are still employed in the third quarter after program exit will earn, on average, 82% of their pre-separation earnings.

FY 1999–FY 2000: N/A

Data Source

TAPR (Trade Act Participant Report) included in the Enterprise Information Management System (EIMS). (includes matches to UI wage records)

Baseline

FY 2001 constitutes the baseline year for theses measures. In that year, 65% of participants were reemployed in the first full quarter after exit, with 90% of those still employed in the third full quarter after exit with an average replacement wage of 86% of the wage at separation.

DOL will implement the new common measures in support of the President's Management Agenda. The proposed definitions for the entered employment, retention and earnings measures vary from the current definitions; thus, a new baseline for this measure will need to be established. The cost per registrant is a new measure and a target will be established and revised as baseline data collection processes are created and approved through the Paperwork Reduction Act and as data becomes available. Baseline data do not exist for the proposed cost indicators.

Comment

Beginning in FY 2001, the TAA/NAFTA program's performance measures were restructured to conform to WIA and align more closely with the dislocated worker goals.

* Definitions for the new common measures will probably affect the proposed targets for the exiting employment, retention and earnings measures. In most cases the level of performance will vary from prior performance due to the new method in which the measures are calculated and may appear to be lower. Once baseline data are available, these targets will need to be reviewed and revised.

Outcome Goal 1.2:  Increase the Number of Youth Making A Successful Transition to Work

Performance Goal 1.2A

PY 2004: Increase placements and educational attainments of youth.

PY 2003: Increase entrance and retention of youth registered under the WIA youth program in education or employment.
PY 2000 – 2002: Same as PY 2003.
PY 1999: N/A

Results

PY 2002:  This goal was achieved. 55% of the 14-18 year-old youth who entered the program without a diploma or equivalent, attained a secondary school diploma or equivalent by the first quarter after exit; 67% of the 19–21 year-old youth were employed in the first quarter after exit; and 80% of the 19–21 year-old youth employed in the first quarter after exit were employed in the third quarter after program exit.

PY 2001: The goal was achieved. Of the 14-18 year old youth, 50.2% were either employed, in advanced training, post-secondary education, military service or apprenticeships in the third quarter after program exit (The target was 50%.) Of the 19-21 year old youth, 75.0% were employed in the third quarter after program exit (The target was 75%.)

PY 2000: The goal was substantially achieved (according to preliminary data). Of the 14-18 year-old youth, 47.4% were either employed, in advanced training, post-secondary education, military service or apprenticeships in the third quarter after program exit. Of the 19-21 year-old youth, 74.4% were employed in the third quarter after program exit.

PY 1999: N/A

Indicator

PY 2004:

  • 60% of youth not in post-secondary education, employment, training or the military at registration will have entered employment or enrolled in post-secondary education or advanced training/occupational skills training or the military in the end of the first quarter after exit;
  • 40%of youth enrolled in education at registration or at any point during the program will attain a diploma, GED or certificate, by the end of the third quarter after exit; and
  • 40% of youth deficient in basic skills will achieve literacy or numeracy gains of one Adult Basic Education (ABE) level (Gains will be measured annually and/or upon program exit.  One ABE level is approximately equivalent to two grade levels) (measured annually and/or upon program exit).

PY 2003:

  • 52% of the 14-18 year-old youth who enter the program without a diploma or equivalent, will attain a secondary school diploma or equivalent by the first quarter after exit;
  • 65% of the 19-21 year-old youth will be employed in the first quarter after exit; and
  • 78% of the 19-21 year-old youth employed in the first quarter after exit will be employed in the third quarter after program exit.

PY 2002:

  • 51% of the 14-18 year-old youth who enter the program without a diploma or equivalent, will attain a secondary school diploma or equivalent by the first quarter after exit;
  • 63% of the 19-21 year-old youth will be employed in the first quarter after exit; and
  • 77% of the 19-21 year-old youth employed in the first quarter after exit will be employed in the third quarter after program exit.

PY 2001:

  • 50% of the 14-18 year-old youth registered under the WIA youth program will be either employed, in advanced training, post-secondary education, military service or apprenticeships in the third quarter after program exit; and
  • 75% of the 19-21 year-old youth served under the WIA youth program and employed in the first quarter after exit will be employed in the third quarter after program exit.

PY 2000:

  • 50% of the 14-18 year-old youth will be either employed, in advanced training, post-secondary education, military service or apprenticeships in the third quarter after program exit; and
  • 73.6% of the 19-21 year-old youth employed in the first quarter after exit will be employed in the third quarter after program exit.

PY 1999: N/A

Data Source

Quarterly State WIA Performance Reports included in the Enterprise Information System (EIMS) and Unemployment Insurance wage records.

Baseline

Younger Youth Indicator: Preliminary annual report data from Program Year 2000 show a performance of 41% for the younger youth diploma or equivalent attainment rate. The baseline for future goals will be reestablished using a combination of final Program Year 2000 data and preliminary Program Year 2001 data.

Older Youth Indicator: Preliminary annual report data from Program Year 2000 show a performance of 65% for the older youth entered employment rate and a performance of 77% for the older youth employment retention rate. The baseline for future goals will be reestablished using a combination of final Program Year 2000 data and preliminary Program Year 2001 data.

DOL will implement the new common measures in support of the President's Management Agenda. The proposed definitions for these measures vary from the current definitions; thus, new baselines for these measures will need to be established. The literacy and numeracy and cost per registrant are new measures and targets will be established and revised as baseline data collection processes are created and approved through the Paperwork Reduction Act and as data becomes available.

Comment

Definitions for the new common measures will probably affect the proposed targets for the new and exiting measures. In most cases, the level of performance will vary from prior performance due to the new method in which the measures are calculated and may appear to be lower. Once baseline data are available, these targets will need to be reviewed and revised.

Performance Goal 1.2B

PY 2004: Improve educational achievements of Job Corps students, increase participation of Job Corps graduates in employment and education, and maintain cost efficiency of program operations.

PY 2000-2003: Increase participation, retention, and earnings of Job Corps graduates in employment and education.

PY 1999: Increase participation and earnings of Job Corps graduates in employment and education.

Results

PY 2002: This goal was not achieved, although 2 of the 4 indicators were reached.

87% of Job Corps graduates entered employment or enrolled in education;

Graduates with jobs were employed at average hourly wages of $8.03;

63% continued to be employed or enrolled in education six months after their initial placement date; and the number of students who attained high school diplomas while enrolled in Job Corps increased by (6,381) 96% from PY 2001.

PY 2001: The goal was substantially met. 89.9% (the target was 85%) of Job Corps graduates got jobs or pursued education at an average hourly wage of $7.96 (The target was $7.25.) 63.4% (the target was 70%) of graduates still had a job or were pursing education six months after their initial placement date.

PY 2000: The goal was substantially met. 91% of Job Corps graduates got jobs or pursued education at an average hourly wage of $7.97. 67% still had a job or were pursuing education after 90 days.

PY 1999: The goal was achieved. 88.3% of Job Corps graduates entered employment or enrolled in education. For those placed in jobs, the average hourly wage was $7.49. 71.3% of graduates continued to be employed or enrolled in education 90 days after their initial placement date.

Indicator

PY 2004:

  • 85% of Job Corps graduates will enter employment or enroll in post-secondary education or advanced training/occupational skills training n the first quarter after exit from the program;
  • 56% of students will attain a GED, high school diploma, or certificate by the end of the third quarter after exit from the program; and
  • 40% of students will achieve literacy or numeracy gains of one Adult Basic Education (ABE) level (one ABE level is approximately equivalent to two grade levels).

PY 2003:

  • The number of students who attain high school diplomas while enrolled in Job Corps will increase by 20% from Program Year 2002;
  • 65% of graduates will continue to be employed or enrolled in education six months after their initial placement date; and
  • Graduates with jobs at six months after initial placement will earn average hourly wages of $8.20

PY 2002:

  • 90% of Job Corps graduates will enter employment or be enrolled in education;
  • The number of students who attain high school diplomas while enrolled in Job Corps will increase by 20% from Program Year 2001;
  • Graduates with jobs will be employed at average hourly wages of $8.20; and
  • 65% will continue to be employed or enrolled in education six months after their initial placement date.

PY 2001:

  • 85% of Job Corps graduates will get jobs with entry average hourly wages of $7.25 or be enrolled in education;
  • 70% will continue to be employed or enrolled in education six months after their initial placement date.

PY 2000:

  • Increase the percent of Job Corps graduates who get jobs or pursue education to 85%;
  • Those who get jobs will have an average entry wage increase from the previous year and 70% will still have a job or will be pursuing education after 90 days.

PY 1999:

  • 75% of Job Corps trainees will get jobs or pursue further education, with those obtaining jobs having an average starting wage of $6.50 per hour.

Data Source

Job Corps Management Information System

Baseline

The entered employment/education goal is based upon graduates who are placed by the first quarter after the expiration of a 12-month placement service period that is provided to all graduates.

The credential attainment goal is based upon those students who have attained a high school diploma, GED, or vocational certificate by the first quarter after the 12-month placement service period has expired.

Outcomes for the literacy and numeracy gains goal are based upon results from the Test for Basic Adult Education (TABE). The goal is based upon students who attain literacy or numeracy gains while enrolled in the program.

DOL will implement the common measures in support of the President's Management Agenda. The common measure definitions vary from the current definitions; thus, new baselines for these measures will, in some cases, need to be established.

Comment

Job Corps targets severely disadvantaged youth with a variety of barriers to self-sufficiency, including deficiencies in education and job skills. To achieve the enhanced quality of placement and job retention required by the Workforce Investment Act, in Program Year 2003, Job Corps will focus resources on program improvements that enhance the full Job Corps experience for students, from reinforced outreach and admission strategies and center program effectiveness to intensified center and post-center career development support.

The targets for the performance indicators for six-month retention and the average hourly wages for Program Year 2003 have been revised.  Program Year 2001 and 2002 data serve as the baseline for establishing a more relevant target. Further, economic conditions have changed since the projection of this goal, resulting in a revision that reflects the impact of this external factor on the program's ability to achieve desired results.

Definitions for the new common measures will probably affect the proposed targets for the exiting employment, retention and earnings measures. In most cases, the level of performance will vary from prior performance due to the new method in which the measures are calculated and may appear to be lower. Once baseline data are available, these targets will need to be reviewed and revised.

Outcome Goal 1.3:  Improve the Effectiveness of Information and Analysis on the U.S. Economy

Performance Goal 1.3

FY 2004: Improve information available to decision-makers on labor market conditions, and price and productivity changes.

FY 1999–2003: 1.3A Produce and disseminate timely, reliable, and relevant economic information. 

1.3B Improve the accuracy, efficiency, and relevancy of economic measures.

Results

N/A.  This is a new goal in FY 2004.

Indicator

Improve relevancy

  1. Improve data relevance by reflecting changes in the economy, as measured by the number of series (e.g., Current Employment Statistics, Employment Cost Index, etc.) converted to the North American Industry Classification System (12 series in total).

Improve accuracy (Coverage)

  1. Improve coverage by increasing the percent of domestic output of in-scope services included in the Producer Price Index (PPI).
  2. Improve coverage by increasing the percent of in-scope industries in the labor productivity measures.

Improve accuracy (Response)

  1. Improve the response to the Employment Cost Index.

Enhance information technology

  1. Lessen the likelihood of major systems failures that could affect the PPI's ability to release data on time, as measured by the percent of the components of the new repricing system completed.

Other measures

  1. Raise customer satisfaction with BLS products and services (e.g. the American Customer Satisfaction Index).
  2. Deliver economic data on time (Percent of scheduled releases issued on time).
  3. Percent of accuracy measures met (e.g., revision, response rates, etc.).

Data Source

Office of Publications and Special Studies report of release dates against OMB release schedule for BLS Principal Federal Economic Indicators; News releases for each Principal Federal Economic Indicator; BLS budget submissions and Quarterly Review and Analysis System; ACSI Annual Report on Federal Government Scores

Baseline

  1. Number of series (e.g., Current Employment Statistics, Employment Cost Index, etc.) converted to the North American Industry Classification System = 1. (Baseline is FY 2002; FY 2004 Target = 8 series.)
  2. Percent of domestic output of in-scope services included in the PPI = 38.8%.  (Baseline is FY 1997; FY 2004 Target = 59.2%.)
  3. Percent of in-scope industries in the labor productivity measures = 52.9%.(Baseline is FY 2000; FY 2004 Target = 61.4%.)
  4. Response to the Employment Cost Index program (Initiation) = 74%.  (Baseline is FY 2002; FY 2004 Target = 78%.)
  5. Percent of the components of the new PPI repricing system completed = 2%.  (Baseline is FY 2002; FY 2004 Target = 33%.)
  6. Percent of customers satisfied with BLS products and services (e.g., the American Customer Satisfaction Index) = 74%.  (Baseline is FY 2001*; FY 2004 Target is > 75%*.)
  7. Percent of scheduled releases issued on time = 99%.  (Baseline is FY 2000; FY 2004 Target = 100%.)
  8. Percent of accuracy measures met (e.g., revision, response rates, etc.) = 94%.  (Baseline is FY 2000; FY 2004 Target = 100%.)

Comment

*BLS currently is exploring new customer segments and may be rotating the measurement of these segments over time.

A complete list of measures can be found in the BLS integrated budget.

Outcome Goal 2.1: Increase Compliance with Worker Protection Laws

Performance Goal 2.1A

FY 2004: Covered American workplaces legally, fairly, and safely employ and compensate their workers as indicated by:

  1. Ensuring continued customer service by maintaining the average number of days to conclude a complaint at the FY 2003 level of 108.
  2. Reducing employer recidivism by increasing by 1% the percent of prior violators who achieved and maintained FLSA compliance following a full FLSA investigation.
  3. Increasing compliance in industries with chronic violations.
    1. as indicated in the garment manufacturing industry by:
      1. Increase by 1% the percent of employees paid “on the payroll” in New York City.
      2. Increase by 2% the number of manufacturers in southern California that monitor contractors (including conducting unannounced visits and payroll review).
    2. as indicated in the long-term health care industry by:
      1. Increase by 5% the percent of nursing homes in compliance with the FLSA.
      2. Increase by 2% the percent of nursing home employees employed or paid in compliance with the FLSA.
    3. as indicated in agricultural commodities by:
      1. Increase by 2% compliance among agricultural employers subject to the DWHaT provisions of MSPA through targeted assistance programs.
      2. Increase by 1% the number of agricultural housing providers who corrected violations following an investigation.
  4. Ensuring timely and accurate prevailing wage determinations by:
    1. Establish a baseline of the number of wage determination data submission forms processed per 1,000 hours.
    2. Issue 80% of all survey-based DBA wage determinations within 60 days of the receipt of the underlying survey data.

FY 2003: Covered American workplaces legally, fairly, and safely employ and compensate their workers as indicated by:

  1. Improving customer service by decreasing the average number of days to conclude a complaint. In FY 2003 -decrease by 2% over the FY 2002 baseline.
  2. Reducing employer recidivism. In FY 2003:
    1. Increase the percent of reinvestigations without any violations by 2 percentage points
    2. Decrease the percent of reinvestigations with identical violations by 2 percentage points.
  3. Increasing compliance in industries with chronic violations.
    1. as indicated in the garment manufacturing industry by:
      1. Establish a baseline of the percent of employees in southern California paid “on the payroll.”
      2. Increase by 2% the number of manufacturers that monitor their contractor shops for compliance in southern California (including conducting unannounced visits and payroll review).
      3. Increase by 5% the number of new contractors in New York City participating in the “Compliance Assistance Program for New Contractors.”
      4. Increase by 2% the number of manufacturers in New York City that monitor their shops for compliance.
      5. Establish a baseline of the percent of employees in New York City paid “on the payroll.”
    2. as indicated in the long-term health care industry by:
      1. Increase by 2% the percent of employees in the residential living (group home) segment of health care industry paid in compliance with the overtime requirements of the Fair Labor Standards Act.
      2. Increase by 1% the percent of nursing home compliant cases concluded in 180 days.
    3. as indicated in agricultural commodities by:
      1. Increase compliance among agricultural employers subject to the DWHaT provisions of MSPA through targeted compliance assistance programs; to be measured in FY 2004.
      2. Increase by 2% the number of agricultural housing providers who corrected violations following an investigation.
      3. Increase by 1% the number of agricultural housing providers who corrected violations following a first investigation.

FY 2002: Covered American workplaces legally, fairly, and safely employ and compensate their workers as indicated by:

  1. Reducing employer violation recidivism. In FY 2002, establish baselines for:
    1. percentage of reinvestigations without violations.
    2. percentage of reinvestigations with any violation.
    3. percentage of reinvestigations with identical violations.
  2. Increasing compliance in industries with chronic violations.
    1. as indicated in the garment manufacturing industry by:
      • Increase by 2 percentage points the number of manufacturers that monitor their contractor shops for compliance in Southern California
      • Increase by 2% the average number of monitoring components used by manufacturers in monitoring their contractors for compliance in Southern California.
      • Increase by 2 percentage points the percentage of contractors in Southern California that pay all employees on the payroll.
      • Increase by 4%age points the level of compliance of new contractors in New York City through compliance education.
      • Increase by 2 percentage points the percentage of contractors in New York City that pay all employees on the payroll.
    2. as indicated in the long-term health care industry by:
      • Increase by 6,000 the number of employees of multi-establishment nursing home corporations impacted by corporate proactive steps such as training and self-audit.
      • Increase by 5% the number of employers (nursing homes) that were provided compliance assistance information through seminars and other outreach efforts.
      • Establish a baseline of the number of employers in compliance with the recordkeeping requirements of the Fair Labor Standards Act.
    3. as indicated in agricultural commodities by:

In FY 2002, establish baselines of compliance with the Migrant and Season Agricultural Worker Protection Act (MSPA) provisions of disclosure, wages, housing and transportation and with the child labor provisions of the Fair Labor Standards Act relative to selected agricultural commodities in various locations in the U.S.

FY 1999 - FY 2001: N/A

Results

FY 2003

  1. The average number of days to conclude a complaint declined to 108 days – a 16% decline.
  2. Both targets were reached.
    1. a. 37% of reinvestigations were without violations – a 3 percentage point increase.
    2. b. 17% of reinvestigations had identical violations – a 2 percentage point decrease.

      3a. All five targets were reached.

  1. 91% of employees in southern California were paid “on the payroll.
  2. 715 manufacturers in southern California monitor their contractor shops – a 2.1% increase.
  3. 73 new contractors in New York City participate in the “Compliance Assistance Program for New Contractors – a 5.8% Increase.
  4. 158 manufacturers in New York City monitor their contractor shops for compliance – a 5.3% increase.

      3b. One of two targets were reached.

  1. 77% of employees in residential living establishments with overtime violations were themselves the subject of an overtime violation – a decline of 6 percentage points.
  2. 48% of nursing home complaint cases were concluded within 180 days – an increase of 6 percentage points.

      3c. All three targets were reached.

  1. Measurement will take place in FY 2004.
  2. 256 agricultural housing providers corrected violations following an investigation – a 53% increase.
  3. 133 agricultural housing providers corrected violations following a first investigation – a 37% increase.

FY 2002

  1. The goals were achieved
    • 34% of reinvestigations were without violations.
    • 25% of reinvestigations (prior violators) had any violation.
    • 19% of reinvestigations (prior violators) had identical violations.

      2a. 3 of 5 goals were achieved

  • 53% of manufacturers that monitor their contractor shops for compliance in Southern California – a 12 percentage point increase.
  • The average number of monitoring components used by manufacturers in monitoring their contractors for compliance in Southern California in FY2002 is 6.37 – a 15% increase.
  • 92% of contractors in Southern California pay all employees on the payroll – a 29 percentage point increase.
  • 43% of new contractors in New York City participating in the NYC Compliance Assistance Program were in compliance – a decline of 8 percentage points.
  • 42% of contractors in New York City pay all employees on the payroll – a 9 percentage point decline.

      2b. The goals were achieved

  • 16,426 additional employees of multi-establishment nursing home corporations impacted by corporate proactive steps such as training and self-audit.
  • 7,681 employers (nursing homes) were provided compliance assistance information through seminars and other outreach efforts – and increase of 216%
  • 77% of employers (residential living) were in compliance with the recordkeeping requirements of the Fair Labor Standards Act.

      2c. The goals were achieved.

  • 61% of employers were in compliance with the MSPA disclosure provisions.
  • 91% of employers were in compliance with the MSPA wage provisions.
  • 74% of employers were in compliance with the MSPA housing safety and health provision.
  • 88% of employers were in compliance with the MSPA vehicle safety provisions (transportation).
  • 90% of employers were in compliance with the MSPA drivers license provisions (transportation).
  • 85% of employers were in compliance with the MSPA vehicle insurance provisions (transportation).
  • 98% of investigated employers were in compliance with child labor provisions.

FY 1999-2001: N/A

Indicator

FY 2003 & 2004: Data on complaint resolutions; Trends in compliance/violation rates; Changes in results of investigations in targeted industries; Data on self-monitoring efforts; Data on compliance assistance efforts.

FY 2002:

1. Percentage of investigations without violations; percentage of reinvestigations with repeat violations; and percentage of reinvestigations with recurring violations.

2a. Trends in the percent of garment manufacturers that monitor their contractor shops for compliance.

2b. Trends in the number of multi-establishment health care corporations that take proactive steps to promote and achieve corporate-wide compliance.

2c. Baseline of compliance with certain MSPA provisions (i.e., disclosure, wages, housing and transportation) and with the child labor provisions of the FLSA relative to selected agricultural commodities in various locations in the U.S.

Data Source

FY 2003 & 2004: Wage and Hour Investigator Support and Reporting Database (WHISARD) data; WH significant activity reports; regional logs and reports on local initiatives; and statistically valid investigation-based compliance surveys in defined industries.

FY 2002:

  1. Wage and Hour Investigator Support and Reporting Database (WHISARD) for FY 2002.
  2. Wage and Hour Investigator Support and Reporting Database (WHISARD) data for garment manufacturer investigations; WHD significant activity reports on health care activities; WHISARD data and regional logs on agricultural activities; statistically-valid investigation-based compliance surveys in defined industries.

Baseline

FY 2004

1.  The average number of days to conclude a complaint is 129.

2.  73% of prior violators achieved and maintained FLSA compliance.

3.a.1. 33%

3.a.2. Of the 1,700 manufacturers in southern California, 41% (700) monitor their contractor shops and 21.3% (362) conduct both unannounced visits and payroll reviews.

3.b.1. 40% of nursing homes are in compliance with the minimum wage, overtime and child labor provisions of FLSA.

3.b.2. 89% of employees in nursing homes are employed or paid in compliance.

3.c.1. TBD, baseline being determined in FY2003

3.c.2. 167 housing providers corrected housing violations following an investigation.

4.a. TBD, baseline being determined in FY 2004.

4.b. 100% of DBA wage determinations updated within 60 days.

FY 2003

1.  The average number of days to conclude a complaint is 129

2.a. 34% of reinvestigations are without violations

2.b. The percent of reinvestigations with identical violations is 19%.

3.a.1. TBD in FY2003

3.a.2. Of the 1,700 manufacturers in southern California, 41% (700) monitor their contractor shops and 21.3% (362) conduct both unannounced visits and payroll reviews.

3.a.3. 69 contractors participate in the “Compliance Assistance Program for New Contractors”

3.a.4. 150 manufacturers monitor in FY 2002

3.a.5. TBD, baseline being established in FY 2003

3.b.1. 83% of residential living employees are paid in compliance with the FLSA overtime provisions

3.b.2. 42% of nursing home complaint based full investigations are concluded in 180 days.

3.c.1. TBD in FY2003

3.c.2. 167 housing providers corrected housing violations following an investigation.

3.c.3. 97 housing providers investigated for the first time corrected housing violations following an investigation

FY 2002:

1.  Baselines to be determined in FY 2002.

2.a. 1. 41%.

2.a. 2. 5.5 (of a total of 7).

2.a. 3. 63%.

2.a. 4. 51%.

2.a. 5. 52%.

2.b. 1. 48,000 employees.

2.b. 2. 2,437 employers.

2.b. 3. Baselines to be determined in FY 2002.

2.c. Baselines to be determined in FY 2002.

Comment

In FY 2003, WHD realized a 16% decease in the average number of days in which to conclude a complaint – from a baseline of 129 to 108.  This represents a decline in the average days to conclude a complaint that was well beyond that expected by the agency.  WHD's ultimate performance objective is to achieve a state of equilibrium between the timely completion of complaint cases and the quality of the cases completed.  The higher the quality of cases, the more likely investigated employers will achieve and sustain long-term compliance.  Success in meeting WHD's recidivism and low-wage goals, for example, are directly related to the quality of the completed cases.  WHD does not want to sacrifice quality (and long term compliance) for speedier case resolution.  Trend data on this specific measure are available for only the last three years.  Therefore, it is not sufficient data for WHD to determine whether the FY 2003 decrease was a one time decline that represents a near equilibrium point or whether the decline will continue- albeit at a slower rate of return.  For these reasons, WHD has determined that the more prudent course of action in FY 2004 is to maintain the average number of days to conclude a complaint at the FY 2003 level.  The agency will continue to evaluate the measure to assess whether future changes are appropriate.

The baseline of 100% of DBA wage determinations updated within 60 days of receipt of underlying data was established in FY 2002; however, few wage surveys were completed in FY 2002 because system improvements were being implemented including processes for conducting statewide surveys nationwide and those that were completed were smaller than surveys planned for FY 2004.  Given the new system changes, DOL expects that more surveys will be completed in FY 2004, and those completed will be more complicated.  Staff levels, however, will remain the same or will be reduced.

Performance Goal 2.1B

FY 2004: Advance safeguards for union financial integrity and democracy and the transparency of union operations by:

  1. Increasing union financial integrity.  Baseline information on unions with fraud will be developed and performance targets will be established.
  2. Increasing union transparency.  The percentage of union reports meeting standards of acceptability for public disclosure will increase to 75%.

FY 2003: Advance safeguards for union financial integrity and democracy and the transparency of union operations by:

  1. Improving timely filing of union financial reports that contain information sufficient for public disclosure. In FY 2003:
    1. Timely filing of union annual financial reports by unions with annual receipts over $200,000 will increase to 85%.
    2. A baseline for the percentage of filed reports determined to be sufficient for public disclosure will be established in FY 2003.
  2. Extending Labor-Management Reporting and Disclosure Act (LMRDA) protections for union financial integrity to a greater number of labor organizations through the more effective use of investigative resources. In FY 2003, the percentage of investigative resources applied to criminal investigation that result in convictions will be increased to 53%.

FY 2002: Union financial integrity and democracy and the transparency of union operations are safeguarded, as indicated by:

  1. Improvement in the timely filing of union annual financial reports that contain information sufficient for public disclosure. In FY 2002, initiate a new electronic forms application and electronic submission process and establish a baseline for timely filing under the new process.
  2. Extending Labor-Management Reporting and Disclosure Act protections for union financial integrity to a greater number of labor organizations through the more effective use of investigative resources. In FY2002, establish a baseline of the percentage of investigative resources applied to criminal investigations that result in convictions.

FY 1999 – 2001: N/A.

Results

FY 2003

  1. a. The timely filing of union annual financial reports by unions with annual receipts over $200,000 was 64%.
    b. A baseline of 75% was established for the percentage of reports determined to be sufficient for public disclosure.
  2. The percentage of investigative resources applied to criminal investigation that result in convictions increased to 63%.

FY 2002

  1. DOL initiated the internet-based public disclosure system in June 2002. A baseline for the timely filing of union reports was established at 44%.
  2. A baseline of 50% was established for the percentage of investigative resources applied to criminal cases that result in conviction.

FY 1999 – 2001: N/A

Indicator

FY 2004 and FY 2005:

  1. 1. Level of union fraud projected from OLMS audit findings.
  2. 2. Number of union meeting standards of acceptability for public disclosure.

FY 2003:

  1. 1.a. Percentage of financial reports timely filed (unions with annual receipts of over $200,000).
    1.b. Percentage of financial reports determined to be sufficient for public disclosure.
  2. Percentage of investigative resources applied to criminal investigations that result in convictions.

FY 2002:

  1. Percentage of financial reports of unions with receipts of over $200,000 that are timely filed under the electronic forms application and electronic submission process initiated during FY 2002 and meet the standards for public disclosure availability.
  2. Percentage of investigative resources applied to criminal investigations that result in convictions.

FY 1999 – FY 2001: N/A

Data Source

  1. OLMS union audit data: statistical model.
  2. OLMS e-LORS Data System.

Baseline

FY 2004:

  1. TBD in FY 2004.
  2. Baseline of 73% established in FY 2003

FY 2003:

  1. 1.a. FY 2002: 83%
    1.b. To be established in FY 2003.
  2. FY 2002: 50%

FY 1999 – FY 2002: N/A

Comment

This is a new performance indicator developed during FY 2003 with initial implementation in FY 2004.  It has two targets.  DOL conducts audits to uncover embezzlements and other criminal and civil violations of the law using streamlined investigative audit procedures.  DOL will use union audit data to measure the fraud level in unions and will seek to reduce fraud levels through a range of activities to ensure union financial integrity.

The timeliness, accuracy, and completeness of statutorily required union financial reports are critical to the public disclosure purposes of LMRDA.  Performance improvement is needed with regard to reporting, because complaint reporting will result in better public disclosure and financial integrity.  By working to increase the percentage of union reports meeting standards of acceptability for public disclosure, DOL will improve the timeliness and quality of union reports.

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