Skip to page content
Secretary of Labor Thomas E. Perez
Bookmark and Share

Newsletter vignettes

Caption below

Frances Perkins as a member of the Factory Investigation Commission in New York, 1911.




Caption below

The Trinity Episcopal Church, designed by James Renwick, on the site where the U.S. Department of Labor now stands. Construction on the U.S. Capitol Dome is being completed in the background. Credit: Library of Congress.




Caption below

The department's Women's Bureau originally published "A Working Woman's Guide to her Job Rights" in 1974.




Caption below

Memphis sanitation workers' strike on 1968.




Caption below

Tony Smith's sculpture, She, 1974, located outside the U.S. Department of Labor in Washington, D.C.




Caption below

Frances Perkins vs Shirley Temple artwork.




Caption below

Assistant Secretary of Labor for International Affairs George Weaver (far right) with Japanese Minister of Labor Ohashi Takeo, aides, and Secretary of Labor Willard Wirtz.




Caption below

On Dec. 8, 1913, President Woodrow Wilson delivers his State of the Union address in person to a joint session of Congress for the first time since 1801. (Credit: Library of Congress).




Caption below

Secretary of Labor Raymond J. Donovan, who served from 1981-1985, in his office at the United States Department of Labor.




Caption below

President Bill Clinton and Robert Reich, who served as labor secretary in Clinton's administration. Credit: Joe Marquette, AP.




Caption below

President Lyndon B. Johnson delivers his State of the Union Address to a joint session of Congress on Jan. 8, 1964, where he introduces his 'War on Poverty.' Credit: National Archives, Lyndon B. Johnson Presidential Library.




Caption below

Disability advocate and wife of Secretary Willard Wirtz, Mary Jane Quisenberry Wirtz.




Caption below

Secretary of Labor William Brock (L) and President Ronald Reagan on a panel on "Preparing for the Demands of Tomorrow's Workforce" at the U.S. Department of Labor, c. 1987.




Caption below

Former Secretary of Labor Lynn Morley Martin greets then-Departmental Historian Judson MacLaury after the dedication of the department's 'Century of Service: Honor Roll of American Labor Organizations' exhibit, which honors labor unions who have demonstrated 100 years of service, September 1992.




Caption below

President Richard Nixon signs the Occupational Safety and Health Act, which created OSHA, into law, Dec. 29, 1970.




Caption below

Ray Marshall, 16th U.S. Secretary of Labor.




Caption below

Secretary of Labor Willard Wirtz presents President John F. Kennedy with a report on manpower requirements.




Caption below

Secretary of Labor Frances Perkins; William Green, president of the American Federation of Labor; First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt; and Charles P. Howard, secretary for the Committee for Industrial Organization at the Mayflower Hotel, Washington, D.C., March 3, 1938.




Caption below

1987 A float celebrates the Department of Labor's diamond jubilee 75th anniversary, Chicago, Illinois.




Caption below

Secretaries of Labor (from left) James Mitchell, Frances Perkins, Arthur Goldberg and Willard Wirtz at a reception for the department's 50th Anniversary, March 4, 1963.




Caption below

Assistant Secretary of Labor and Executive Vice Chairman of the President's Commission on the Status of Women Esther Peterson; First Vice President of the National Federation of Business and Professional Women's Clubs Virginia Allen; President of the National Federation of Business Clubs Dr. Minnie C. Miles and President John F. Kennedy at a January 18, 1963, meeting at the White House. Photo credit: Schlesinger Library, Radcliffe Institute, Harvard University.




Caption below

Young African miners, c. 1941. Credit: Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division.




Caption below

15 year-old Estelle Poiriere, an employee of Doffer Granite No. 1 mill in Fall River, Massachusetts, shows the laceration of her index and middle finger caused when her hand became caught in a card machine. Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division.




Caption below

President Gerald Ford signs the Employee Retirement Income Security Act into law on Labor Day in 1974. ERISA sets the minimum standards for retirement, health and other welfare benefits, today enforced by the Employee Benefits Security Administration.




Caption below

Former Secretary of Labor Elizabeth Dole. Photo Credit: National Archives.




Caption below

After the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom on August 28, 1963, leaders arrived for a meeting at the Oval Office, attended by President John F. Kennedy, Vice President Lyndon B. Johnson and Secretary of Labor Willard Wirtz.




Caption below

President Lyndon B. Johnson signs the Economic Opportunity Act in the Rose Garden at the White House, August 20, 1964. Photo by Cecil Stoughton, Lyndon B. Johnson Presidential Library.




Caption below

Former Secretary of Labor James P. Mitchell.




Caption below

Present and Past: Secretary Perez and some of the previous Labor Secretaries that he has something in common with.




Caption below

Secretary Willie Usery, Jr. with former President Ford in 1978. Photo courtesy, Southern Labor Archives, Georgia State University Library (photo identifier: L1985-12_837).




Caption below

President Gerald R. Ford shakes the hand of the new Labor Secretary John T. Dunlop, while Vice President Nelson Rockefeller looks on.




Caption below

David A. Morse accepts the Nobel Peace Prize on behalf of the International Labor Organization, 1969. Photo Credit: ILO.




Caption below

Maurice J. Tobin is sworn in as U.S. Secretary of Labor, as Helen Tobin (center) looks on. Credit: Harry S. Truman Library and Museum, National Archives and Records Administration.




Caption below

Fair Labor Standards Act — 75 Years. "The test of our progress is not whether we add more to the abundance of those who have much; it is whether we provide enough for those who have too little." — Franklin Delano Roosevelt.




Caption below

Secretary of Labor Lewis Schwellenbach, evidently arriving at the White House for a Cabinet meeting. Photo Credit: Abbie Rowe, National Archives, Harry S. Truman




Caption below

Former Labor Secretary George P. Shultz




Caption below

Pauline Perrow




Caption below

Frances Perkins




Caption below

Secretary Lynn M. Martin




Caption below

Labor Secretary Braves TV Interview, From Husband




Caption below

Arthur J. Goldberg — Labor Secretary, Supreme Court Justice, Ambassador, Spy.




Caption below

An Oakland automobile like this one was the first government automobile used by a cabinet member.




Caption below

The 54,000-ton passenger liner Vaterland was one of the German ships seized by the Department of Labor and other authorities at the outset of World War I. It was later renamed Leviathan by President Woodrow Wilson and used to transport troops for the remainder of the war. Photo credit: U.S. Naval Historical Center




Caption below

Former Secretary of Labor Frances Perkins




Caption below

Civilian Conservation Corps enrollee planting locust root for the Natchez Project in Lexington, Tenn., ca. 1933. Photo Credit: National Archives, Lexington, Tenn., ca 1933




Caption below

Eula Bingham




Caption below

Carin Clauss




Caption below

Bessie Margolin




Caption below

Kitty Higgins




Caption below

Alexis Herman




Caption below

Arthur Fletcher




Caption below

Ernest Green as Assistant Secretary of Labor for ETA (1977-1981) representing the U.S. at an international conference.




Caption below

Elizabeth Duncan Koontz.




Caption below

Hearing of the Select Committee to Investigate Improper Activities in Labor-Management Relations 'McClellan Commitee'. Chief Counsel Robert F. Kennedy and Senator John F. Kennedy question a witness, May, 1957. (Credit: Douglas Jones, photographer, LOOK Magazine Photograph Collection, Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division, [Reproduction number e.g., LC-L9-60-8812, frame 8].)




Caption below

Miniature PWBA banner made by a former investigator from the agency's Seattle Office. The banner was created for a March 1992 PWBA conference in San Francisco.




Caption below

The Beatles in America.




Caption below

Migrant workers harvesting potatoes.




Caption below

Librarians Lena Notson and Alyce Thomas had to sort and file periodicals by hand using tools like the binders and broadside racks shown above. Today, periodicals are managed with electronic databases allowing the Wirtz staff to search thousands of publications with the click of a button.




Caption below

LBJ signs the Age Discrimination in Employment Act into law.




Caption below

Secretary Hodgson (on left with hand on desk) looks on as President Nixon signs the Occupational Safety and Health Act into law.




Caption below

Secretary Martin P. Durkin




Caption below

In 1910, before DOL's establishment, three boys as they shovel zinc ore near Big Bonanza Mine in Aurora, Mo. Only two of the three boys go to school, while the third works in the mine every day, including weekends. Credit: Lewis Wickes Hines, photographer, 1874-1940.




Caption below

Interior of tobacco shed, Hawthorn Farm, ca. 1914. Girls in foreground are 8-, 9-, and 10-years-old. The 10-year-old makes 50 cents a day. 12 workers on this farm are 8- to 14-years-old, and about 15 are over 15-years-old. Credit: Flickr/The Library of Congress.




Caption below

Miners posing after a shift.




Caption below

Frame from the DOL Timeline




Caption below

Frame from the DOL Centennial video




Caption below

A sheet music cover for the "Rosie the Riveter" song, words and music by Redd Evans and John Jacob Loeb. Paramount Music Corporation, 1619 Broadway, New York, NY.




Caption below

President Gerald Ford lays the cornerstone for the current Department of Labor headquarters building in 1974. Also pictured is one of the ceremonial trowels used during the ceremony that was returned to the department in 2007 by a member of the public who found it among a box of tools inherited from a relative.




Caption below

President Gerald Ford lays the cornerstone for the current Department of Labor headquarters building in 1974. Also pictured is one of the ceremonial trowels used during the ceremony that was returned to the department in 2007 by a member of the public who found it among a box of tools inherited from a relative.




Caption below

Louis F. Post




Caption below

J. Ernest Wilkins, one of the first African-Americans in U.S. history to attain the title of assistant secretary in the federal government.




Caption below

Secretary Durkin served for only eight months before leaving the department. He was the "plumber" of President Eisenhower's cabinet dubbed "nine millionaires and a plumber."




Caption below

At the World Trade Center in New York City, fire and rescue workers sift through the rubble of the twin towers and other buildings destroyed in the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001.




Caption below

The 1956 3-cent Labor Day stamp.




Caption below

Both Matthew Maguire and Peter McGuire are credited with inventing the "workingman's holiday," AKA Labor day.




Caption below

Daniel Patrick Moynihan, a champion of American workers, was the department's first assistant secretary for policy.




Caption below

President Truman with Secretary of Labor Maurice Tobin sign the Fair Labor Standards Act amendments in 1949. (from the President Truman library website)




Caption below

An old punch clock.




Caption below

The cover of Upton Sinclair's The Jungle.




Caption below

President George Bush signs the Americans with Disabilities Act




Caption below

A cover from the Monthly Labor Reviewfor volumes from July, 1915 to December, 1920.




Caption below

One portion of the Jack Beal murals from the Department of Labor's headquarters.




Caption below

President Johnson signs the Civil Rights Act.




Caption below

Delegates to the first International Labor Conference, held in Washington, D.C. at the Pan American Union in October, 1919. Front row, center, is Secretary of Labor William B. Wilson, while AFL President Samuel Gompers, wearing the hat, is at left.




Caption below

President Richard M. Nixon signed the legislation creating the Occupational Safety and Health Act, which created OSHA.




Caption below

Swedish-born Mary Anderson was the first director of the department's Women's Bureau 90 years ago.




Caption below

Frances Perkins




Caption below

Author Goldberg, President Kennedy's first labor secretary. He worked to prevent a strike by the Metropolitan Opera in New York City and avert cancellation of the 1961-1962 season.